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  • Originally posted by The_Tick View Post

    I have two coworkers that have had bills that reach as high as $1,000 a month for July/August/September, because they keep their house around 73 degrees.
    I might be in that boat if I lived there. The missus hates the heat.

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    • Originally posted by The_Tick View Post

      I have two coworkers that have had bills that reach as high as $1,000 a month for July/August/September, because they keep their house around 73 degrees.
      Sheesh, not worth it.

      My wife freaks when our power bill goes over $200. We use a swamp cooler up here in the desert, so that is way cheaper than AC. Of course the temps will often not drop below 80 in the house, but you get used to it.

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      • Originally posted by The_Tick View Post

        I have two coworkers that have had bills that reach as high as $1,000 a month for July/August/September, because they keep their house around 73 degrees.
        It seems a solar system there would pay for itself relatively quickly especially if you install it yourself. Labor costs for installing solar are too high, IMHO.
        "If there is one thing I am, it's always right." -Ted Nugent.
        "I honestly believe saying someone is a smart lawyer is damning with faint praise. The smartest people become engineers and scientists." -SU.
        "Yet I still see wisdom in that which Uncle Ted posts." -creek.
        GIVE 'EM HELL, BRIGHAM!

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        • Originally posted by Uncle Ted View Post

          It seems a solar system there would pay for itself relatively quickly especially if you install it yourself. Labor costs for installing solar are too high, IMHO.
          I have solar on my house. I did the PPA though through Vivint. I will keep my house right around 74 degrees and I will average around $180 a month for electricity between Vivint and PGE. Worth it for my needs.

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          • http://energy.sc.gov/node/3069
            Per the Dept. of Energy, I pay an average of 12.34/KwH to my provider Duke Energy Progress. I keep my house at 68F in summer and 64F in winter. 2600 sq ft, brick ranch, with maximum efficiency windows and more the recommended amount of insulation in the attic, ridge vent, and not completely black shingles (I wanted white/reflective, but my wife said, "uhh, no!"). 3/4 the house is on a gas/electric furnace/AC, the other fourth is heatpump for both. We have gas logs in the office where my wife works, right in the middle of the house. They get used a lot.

            We spend around $250/month keeping the house at 68F. In the winter months, our bill is well below average because we have a gas furnace (uncommon here because most people can't connect to a gas grid and have to have propane tanks).

            I have too many trees to make solar viable here, and I'm down in a draw, so the wind up the hill coming across the coastal plains wouldn't be enough to generate power.

            Our powerbill in New Orleans, to keep that 1921 house at 68F, with no f-ing insulation, was $450.

            I only like to sweat inside for one reason.
            "Yeah, but never trust a Ph.D who has an MBA as well. The PhD symbolizes intelligence and discipline. The MBA symbolizes lust for power." -- Katy Lied

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            • Originally posted by wuapinmon View Post
              http://energy.sc.gov/node/3069
              Per the Dept. of Energy, I pay an average of 12.34/KwH to my provider Duke Energy Progress. I keep my house at 68F in summer and 64F in winter. 2600 sq ft, brick ranch, with maximum efficiency windows and more the recommended amount of insulation in the attic, ridge vent, and not completely black shingles (I wanted white/reflective, but my wife said, "uhh, no!"). 3/4 the house is on a gas/electric furnace/AC, the other fourth is heatpump for both. We have gas logs in the office where my wife works, right in the middle of the house. They get used a lot.

              We spend around $250/month keeping the house at 68F. In the winter months, our bill is well below average because we have a gas furnace (uncommon here because most people can't connect to a gas grid and have to have propane tanks).

              I have too many trees to make solar viable here, and I'm down in a draw, so the wind up the hill coming across the coastal plains wouldn't be enough to generate power.

              Our powerbill in New Orleans, to keep that 1921 house at 68F, with no f-ing insulation, was $450.

              I only like to sweat inside for one reason.
              I don't like sweating inside either, but 68 in summer is pretty low.

              We keep it at 74 summer, maybe 72 for the upstairs AC every once in a while when I'm feeling too hot at night and can't sleep. Of course humidity is low, to say the least, in Utah. 68 winter.

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              • Originally posted by BigFatMeanie View Post

                I don't like sweating inside either, but 68 in summer is pretty low.

                We keep it at 74 summer, maybe 72 for the upstairs AC every once in a while when I'm feeling too hot at night and can't sleep. Of course humidity is low, to say the least, in Utah. 68 winter.
                My kids in winter, "I'm cold." Me, "Go take the dog for a walk; it'll feel nice when you come back inside. Of course, it was 78F here today---in February--so who knows what cold is like anymore.

                We also make use of our whole-house fan (attic fan in the South), quite a lot. It'll push all the air out of the house in about a minute, and make the curtains hang sideways in front of a window if there's only one open.
                "Yeah, but never trust a Ph.D who has an MBA as well. The PhD symbolizes intelligence and discipline. The MBA symbolizes lust for power." -- Katy Lied

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