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  • Originally posted by Pelado View Post

    Grātiās tibi agō
    Compare the west from November 1, 2022. Pretty drastic change., especially in California.

    Image 3-11-23 at 2.43 PM.jpeg

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    • Originally posted by chrisrenrut View Post

      Compare the west from November 1, 2022. Pretty drastic change., especially in California.

      Image 3-11-23 at 2.43 PM.jpeg
      Pretty incredible change - especially for the San Joaquin and Tulare Basins.
      "I think it was King Benjamin who said 'you sorry ass shitbags who have no skills that the market values also have an obligation to have the attitude that if one day you do in fact win the PowerBall Lottery that you will then impart of your substance to those without.'"
      - Goatnapper'96

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      • Originally posted by Pelado View Post

        Pretty incredible change - especially for the San Joaquin and Tulare Basins.
        I've gone from D3 or 2 to D0. Going to be a great year for wildflowers.

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        • Still waiting for that 30 inches of snow we’ve gotten last week to ease our drought designation
          "...you pointy-headed autopsy nerd. Do you think it's possible for you to post without using words like "hilarious," "absurd," "canard," and "truther"? Your bare assertions do not make it so. Maybe your reasoning is too stunted and your vocabulary is too limited to go without these epithets."
          "You are an intemperate, unscientific poster who makes light of very serious matters.”
          - SeattleUte

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          • I’m in Utah and I think the last time I saw this much snow was the year when it all quickly melted off in the spring so fast there was a sandbagged river going down state street in SLC.

            "If there is one thing I am, it's always right." -Ted Nugent.
            "I honestly believe saying someone is a smart lawyer is damning with faint praise. The smartest people become engineers and scientists." -SU.
            "Yet I still see wisdom in that which Uncle Ted posts." -creek.
            GIVE 'EM HELL, BRIGHAM!

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            • Originally posted by Shaka View Post
              Lone Rock will be surrounded by water this year. It will be interesting to see how much they cut down on the releases from the dam. If they go conservative and our wet spring holds, we might get a rise of more than fifty feet.
              Having only recently discovered how great Lake Powell is, I have tracked the snowpack pretty closely the past couple years. We are about to pass the 10-year high, which was set in 2019. With storms still coming, we could beat that 2019 pack by a significant margin. It is also beating the 30 year average.

              Capture.JPG

              The summer of 2019 (after the previous 10 year high), Powell rose 53 feet, but it was 50 feet higher than current lake level when that rise began. So all things being equal, I would expect an even greater rise this summer just because the same volume of water will drive the lake level higher when you begin a lower elevation. Of course all things probably aren't equal and I know nothing about the intricacies of climate effect on evaporation, soil soaking up the runoff, or river management approach by Interior in general that could/will effect lake level. But regardless I'm very excited about the lake being significantly higher this year.

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              • Originally posted by Omaha 680 View Post

                Having only recently discovered how great Lake Powell is, I have tracked the snowpack pretty closely the past couple years. We are about to pass the 10-year high, which was set in 2019. With storms still coming, we could beat that 2019 pack by a significant margin. It is also beating the 30 year average.

                Capture.JPG

                The summer of 2019 (after the previous 10 year high), Powell rose 53 feet, but it was 50 feet higher than current lake level when that rise began. So all things being equal, I would expect an even greater rise this summer just because the same volume of water will drive the lake level higher when you begin a lower elevation. Of course all things probably aren't equal and I know nothing about the intricacies of climate effect on evaporation, soil soaking up the runoff, or river management approach by Interior in general that could/will effect lake level. But regardless I'm very excited about the lake being significantly higher this year.
                We had a fairly wet fall which typically improves soil moisture and runoff. But our deficit was so big to begin with that I am not sure how much of an impact that will have.

                You are right that when the lake is low, an equivalent amount of water will result in a larger rise. Will be interesting to see what happens. Another big factor is how things warm up in the spring. What happened in '83 is that things were cool for a long time and then warmed up rapidly, leading to massive floods.
                "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
                "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.
                "Juilliardk N I ibuprofen Hyu I U unhurt u" - creekster

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                • I've been compulsively following Lake Shasta's level this year. I've felt sad driving south the last couple of years looking at the level. Looking forward to driving down there in May!
                  "...you pointy-headed autopsy nerd. Do you think it's possible for you to post without using words like "hilarious," "absurd," "canard," and "truther"? Your bare assertions do not make it so. Maybe your reasoning is too stunted and your vocabulary is too limited to go without these epithets."
                  "You are an intemperate, unscientific poster who makes light of very serious matters.”
                  - SeattleUte

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post

                    We had a fairly wet fall which typically improves soil moisture and runoff. But our deficit was so big to begin with that I am not sure how much of an impact that will have.

                    You are right that when the lake is low, an equivalent amount of water will result in a larger rise. Will be interesting to see what happens. Another big factor is how things warm up in the spring. What happened in '83 is that things were cool for a long time and then warmed up rapidly, leading to massive floods.
                    1983 was wild. In my consuming info on Lake Powell the past couple years I of course read about how GC dam managers had to deal with the 83 inflow. Cavitation failure of the spillway tunnels? Emergency plywood walls on top of the dam? How did I never learn about this before? Actually I probably learned about it in hydrology at BYU but didn't pay attention.

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                    • Originally posted by Omaha 680 View Post

                      1983 was wild. In my consuming info on Lake Powell the past couple years I of course read about how GC dam managers had to deal with the 83 inflow. Cavitation failure of the spillway tunnels? Emergency plywood walls on top of the dam? How did I never learn about this before? Actually I probably learned about it in hydrology at BYU but didn't pay attention.
                      Wasn't that also the year of the State Street River in SLC?
                      "I think it was King Benjamin who said 'you sorry ass shitbags who have no skills that the market values also have an obligation to have the attitude that if one day you do in fact win the PowerBall Lottery that you will then impart of your substance to those without.'"
                      - Goatnapper'96

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                      • Originally posted by Pelado View Post

                        Wasn't that also the year of the State Street River in SLC?
                        Yep. One of my first memories was going with my mom and grandma to see it in person.

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                        • Originally posted by Omaha 680 View Post

                          Having only recently discovered how great Lake Powell is, I have tracked the snowpack pretty closely the past couple years. We are about to pass the 10-year high, which was set in 2019. With storms still coming, we could beat that 2019 pack by a significant margin. It is also beating the 30 year average.

                          Capture.JPG

                          The summer of 2019 (after the previous 10 year high), Powell rose 53 feet, but it was 50 feet higher than current lake level when that rise began. So all things being equal, I would expect an even greater rise this summer just because the same volume of water will drive the lake level higher when you begin a lower elevation. Of course all things probably aren't equal and I know nothing about the intricacies of climate effect on evaporation, soil soaking up the runoff, or river management approach by Interior in general that could/will effect lake level. But regardless I'm very excited about the lake being significantly higher this year.
                          I look at that graph every day. I'm excited, especially with the predicted storms. How much it rises is truly dependent on how much they release. The rumor is that they are cutting back on releases this year in order to get the lake to a more healthy level. If they truly do release less from the dam the rise could go far beyond 53 ft. We need about 63 ft to get The Cut open. In other news, the lake has started to rise a bit. I think that's mostly due to the rains in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

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                          • Originally posted by Shaka View Post

                            I look at that graph every day. I'm excited, especially with the predicted storms. How much it rises is truly dependent on how much they release. The rumor is that they are cutting back on releases this year in order to get the lake to a more healthy level. If they truly do release less from the dam the rise could go far beyond 53 ft. We need about 63 ft to get The Cut open. In other news, the lake has started to rise a bit. I think that's mostly due to the rains in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.
                            It also depends on management of the basin upstream correct? Last summer they loaned a lot of water to Powell to prop it up. I believe a lot of those extra releases to help powell are finally ending (e.g. at Flaming Gorge). Would love to have the cut open and I'm rooting for it but I don't want to get my hopes up too much. Our only scheduled trip this year is the week of August 6 so I'll at least be there at high water.

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                            • Originally posted by Omaha 680 View Post

                              1983 was wild. In my consuming info on Lake Powell the past couple years I of course read about how GC dam managers had to deal with the 83 inflow. Cavitation failure of the spillway tunnels? Emergency plywood walls on top of the dam? How did I never learn about this before? Actually I probably learned about it in hydrology at BYU but didn't pay attention.
                              Oh yeah. I remember it really well. Crazy times.
                              "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
                              "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.
                              "Juilliardk N I ibuprofen Hyu I U unhurt u" - creekster

                              Comment


                              • Guys, we did it! Officially best snowpack in more than 10 years and it's still snowing.

                                Capture.JPG

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