Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Official Thread for Runners

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by nikuman View Post
    I am also a mild pronator, and I also had some MTSS last year when I was switching. I don't know why. However, when I visited with my kinesiologist, she told me that pronation is only a very small part of the story. In my case, I have bowed calf bones so my probation is the trade off I have for no ITBS.

    I have had no problems with either now that I am adjusted. The less shoe I have, the better I do now that I am adjusted. I don't know what any of this means for you.
    Interesting. I am aware of some peer-reviewed research coming out lately that suggests actual bending (bowing) of the tibia might be more responsible for MTSS than subtalar joint pronation. Maybe I just have bendy tibias.

    Comment


    • I have no idea how I pronate, but I'll say that when I run in my VFFs by foot tends to rotate a lot more than in shoes. I figure this rotation is normal as I tend to land more on the oustide part of my foot and rotate in a bit.

      Of course I've only ran twice for a total of maybe 1.5 miles, but it's enough that I see the difference.
      "Discipleship is not a spectator sport. We cannot expect to experience the blessing of faith by standing inactive on the sidelines any more than we can experience the benefits of health by sitting on a sofa watching sporting events on television and giving advice to the athletes. And yet for some, “spectator discipleship” is a preferred if not primary way of worshipping." -Pres. Uchtdorf

      Comment


      • I saw a guy running in Reebok Zigs last night -- that was a first for me.
        I have nothing else to say at this time.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Parrot Head View Post
          I saw a guy running in Reebok Zigs last night -- that was a first for me.
          Running in Reebok anything is weird.
          Awesomeness now has a name. Let me introduce myself.

          Comment


          • As someone that enjoys running downhill, mainly because it is easier and I can catch up to and pass people, I thought this was interesting.

            http://www.usatriathlon.org/about-mu...ng-020712.aspx

            I see too many people holding back and not letting gravity do its work.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by BigPiney View Post
              As someone that enjoys running downhill, mainly because it is easier and I can catch up to and pass people, I thought this was interesting.

              http://www.usatriathlon.org/about-mu...ng-020712.aspx

              I see too many people holding back and not letting gravity do its work.
              Looks like the photo in that article is from the Ogden Marathon.

              I have to admit - learning to run downhill would help me a great deal. I could do much better at finding the balance between feeling like I'm holding back and feeling like I've let momentum carry me too far and could be on the verge of losing it. Especially on runs like Ogden, where there is so much downhill early on I feel like I need to hold back to keep my pace, but holding back might not be taking advantage of gravity to the fullest extent possible without tiring myself out.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by nikuman View Post
                This weekend I attempt to break my oldest PR. There's a local 5k that we do every year. I usually run it with my daughter at a leisurely pace, but this year I'm trying to beat my time. This PR is actually from in 2009 - my first ever race after I lost all that weight. Had a great day that day and ran a 21:40.

                I think I'm a good deal faster now. In training runs I've done a 5k in under 21:00 (last summer) but that's not official. My speed workouts have been going well and I don't see any reason why I can't beat my time, probably go sub 21:00. I did mile repeats at 6:21, 6:30 and 6:38 the other day. And I think I could run a sub 6:00 mile on a good day if I really tried. But I'm a bit nervous - running for 20 minutes or so above my lactate threshold is no easy trick.
                Completely sucked at the race - finished in 23 minutes and change. Had a mental meltdown halfway through (was keeping pace until that point); the fact that it was a torrential downpour didn't help. I was so disappointed that the next day I ran 3.1 miles at the same pace and then ran 5 more as punishment. Oh well - there are lots of 5ks around to run, so I'll get another shot.

                On a separate note, I can't tell you all how proud I am of my parents (58 and 63 years old). My dad (58) finished his first ever half in January - something I think I mentioned before - and my mom finished a 5k. And now they have the bug. They are running a lot together, with my dad training for two more halfs and perhaps a full, and my mom moving up to 10ks. They thought they were getting old but they have now found something that energizes them. They feel young again, or at least they don't feel old. Both of them went years without training - my mom has actually never done anything athletic until now - so I'm quite proud of them.
                Awesomeness now has a name. Let me introduce myself.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by nikuman View Post
                  Completely sucked at the race - finished in 23 minutes and change. Had a mental meltdown halfway through (was keeping pace until that point); the fact that it was a torrential downpour didn't help. I was so disappointed that the next day I ran 3.1 miles at the same pace and then ran 5 more as punishment. Oh well - there are lots of 5ks around to run, so I'll get another shot.
                  One thing I've learned is that some days you have it and other days you don't. You still beat my PR even with a mental breakdown . I just wish I could run 3.1 miles without getting injured.
                  "Discipleship is not a spectator sport. We cannot expect to experience the blessing of faith by standing inactive on the sidelines any more than we can experience the benefits of health by sitting on a sofa watching sporting events on television and giving advice to the athletes. And yet for some, “spectator discipleship” is a preferred if not primary way of worshipping." -Pres. Uchtdorf

                  Comment


                  • I'll echo the sometimes you have it and sometimes you don't sentiment.

                    And torrential downpours never help.

                    5K's are a dime a dozen.

                    Well - they usually charge more than a dime if you're getting a t-shirt...but you know what I mean. Around here once spring hits it seems like some group or another is putting on a 5K every other weekend.

                    Comment


                    • I've been running 3 times a week in my VFFs. I absolutely love them. I've been taking it slow as evidenced by teh fact that my first run over 1 mile was Monday. At first my feet (mostly the arches) and calves were sore quite a bit, but nothing too bad to keep me from running. Then Monday morning the top part of my feet, in the middle of my foot, was really sore almost to the point that I didn't go out running. I finished my 1.25 mile run and I've had general soreness for the past two days. This morning I was still sore so I decided to wait one more day and if the soreness isn't practically gone I'm going out in my regular running shoes tomorrow morning.

                      So question for those that run in VFFs or barefoot, is my soreness normal? I expected some soreness and I'm getting it, I'm just surprised it came when I did a 1 mile run, but of course I hadn't run for 3-4 months before I started out in the VFFs. I don't feel injured and I can walk just fine, it really just feels sore.
                      "Discipleship is not a spectator sport. We cannot expect to experience the blessing of faith by standing inactive on the sidelines any more than we can experience the benefits of health by sitting on a sofa watching sporting events on television and giving advice to the athletes. And yet for some, “spectator discipleship” is a preferred if not primary way of worshipping." -Pres. Uchtdorf

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Moliere View Post
                        I've been running 3 times a week in my VFFs. I absolutely love them. I've been taking it slow as evidenced by teh fact that my first run over 1 mile was Monday. At first my feet (mostly the arches) and calves were sore quite a bit, but nothing too bad to keep me from running. Then Monday morning the top part of my feet, in the middle of my foot, was really sore almost to the point that I didn't go out running. I finished my 1.25 mile run and I've had general soreness for the past two days. This morning I was still sore so I decided to wait one more day and if the soreness isn't practically gone I'm going out in my regular running shoes tomorrow morning.

                        So question for those that run in VFFs or barefoot, is my soreness normal? I expected some soreness and I'm getting it, I'm just surprised it came when I did a 1 mile run, but of course I hadn't run for 3-4 months before I started out in the VFFs. I don't feel injured and I can walk just fine, it really just feels sore.
                        I'd be really careful with soreness there--metatarsal stress fractures are not uncommon with these. Really, I'd be careful about ever running (in any shoes) when you're sore at the beginning, unless you know exactly what that soreness and that it's going to go away.
                        At least the Big Ten went after a big-time addition in Nebraska; the Pac-10 wanted a game so badly, it added Utah
                        -Berry Trammel, 12/3/10

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by ERCougar View Post
                          I'd be really careful with soreness there--metatarsal stress fractures are not uncommon with these. Really, I'd be careful about ever running (in any shoes) when you're sore at the beginning, unless you know exactly what that soreness and that it's going to go away.
                          I'm no doctor, but of I have anything weird going on with my actual foot I call it quits and run another day.
                          Awesomeness now has a name. Let me introduce myself.

                          Comment


                          • I don't have anything important to report, but it's been awhile since I've last visited this thread. I've been running consistently (3 times a week) now since the beginning of the year. (I unintentionally took some time off after the half marathon in November.) I run a pretty basic routine. On Monday/Wednesday I'll run a 3.5 mile loop around the neighborhood that has ~180 ft of elevation change. Since I don't work Fridays, I try and do a longer run an out and back towards the mountain. I've done 8 miles the last few Fridays which has ~ 400 ft of elevation change. My wife usually runs with a running group on Saturday mornings, but she's pregnant, so I have a feeling that she'll eventually stop participating with them, and I may sneak in another morning, mostly so that I can run with some people faster than me (opposed to running alone, which is all I've been doing).

                            I'm currently registered for a 10k in three weeks, the Salt Lake City Half in April (that may or may not happen), and the St. George Marathon in October. The 10k is my second obligation in the runner's series to bypass the lottery for St. George. It seems pretty early to be training for anything specific and since I've only been running since August, I'm just trying to build miles. I'd like to get to the point that I can do 14 miles pretty comfortably.

                            All I'm doing is running and I'm probably more focused on speed than I should be. I find myself getting frustrated in that I'm guessing my speed has likely plateaued without incorporating specific interval work. This week was the first time that I've done the 3.5 mile loop in a sub 8:00 with a couple of low 7:50's runs. I'd like to get to the point where I'm doing a 7:30 pace without too much pain. This goal is based on nothing but an expectation from being a pretty decent cyclist and trying to apply that to running.

                            One question that I've had is, in order to get a read of what my current pace is, do I need to go down to the local high school and run around the track? Since my current runs are 1/2 downhill and 1/2 uphill, does that essentially equal a flat run to base my expectations on? I mean, I don't expect to run a 6:30 mile around the track, but is it fair to expect it to be faster? My longer runs have been around a 9:00 pace, so that seems to be close, albeit a bit slower than what has been recommended earlier on this thread. I just don't know what the hell I'm doing out there. For those on here with experience, is eight months out, way too far out to worry about the marathon yet, and if so, is there a book or program that I should be following to help me set realistic and safe goals?
                            I told him he was a goddamn Nazi Stormtrooper.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Dwight Schr-ute View Post
                              I don't have anything important to report, but it's been awhile since I've last visited this thread. I've been running consistently (3 times a week) now since the beginning of the year. (I unintentionally took some time off after the half marathon in November.) I run a pretty basic routine. On Monday/Wednesday I'll run a 3.5 mile loop around the neighborhood that has ~180 ft of elevation change. Since I don't work Fridays, I try and do a longer run an out and back towards the mountain. I've done 8 miles the last few Fridays which has ~ 400 ft of elevation change. My wife usually runs with a running group on Saturday mornings, but she's pregnant, so I have a feeling that she'll eventually stop participating with them, and I may sneak in another morning, mostly so that I can run with some people faster than me (opposed to running alone, which is all I've been doing).

                              I'm currently registered for a 10k in three weeks, the Salt Lake City Half in April (that may or may not happen), and the St. George Marathon in October. The 10k is my second obligation in the runner's series to bypass the lottery for St. George. It seems pretty early to be training for anything specific and since I've only been running since August, I'm just trying to build miles. I'd like to get to the point that I can do 14 miles pretty comfortably.

                              All I'm doing is running and I'm probably more focused on speed than I should be. I find myself getting frustrated in that I'm guessing my speed has likely plateaued without incorporating specific interval work. This week was the first time that I've done the 3.5 mile loop in a sub 8:00 with a couple of low 7:50's runs. I'd like to get to the point where I'm doing a 7:30 pace without too much pain. This goal is based on nothing but an expectation from being a pretty decent cyclist and trying to apply that to running.

                              One question that I've had is, in order to get a read of what my current pace is, do I need to go down to the local high school and run around the track? Since my current runs are 1/2 downhill and 1/2 uphill, does that essentially equal a flat run to base my expectations on? I mean, I don't expect to run a 6:30 mile around the track, but is it fair to expect it to be faster? My longer runs have been around a 9:00 pace, so that seems to be close, albeit a bit slower than what has been recommended earlier on this thread. I just don't know what the hell I'm doing out there. For those on here with experience, is eight months out, way too far out to worry about the marathon yet, and if so, is there a book or program that I should be following to help me set realistic and safe goals?
                              Are you doing the Spectrum 10K then? I'll be there. I hear it's a great race, but I've never fit it in until this year and I too am doing it for the Runner's Series. I'm doing Ogden in May, and I'm still deciding on St George, but I'll leave the door open this way.

                              No, hilly loops are not equivalent to flat loops (which is essentially your question). One quick formula that works pretty well is to add 1 mile per 1000 ft gained and subtract one per 2000 ft lost. So if you do a 3.5 mile loop with 180 ft gained and lost would be the equivalent of 3.5 + 0.18 - 0.09 = 3.59, which doesn't sound like a lot, but it's about 2.5%. For an 8 minute mile pace, you'll slow down to about 8:13ish.

                              BUT--Garmin always overestimates elevation change, so all bets are off if you're getting that number from your 305.
                              At least the Big Ten went after a big-time addition in Nebraska; the Pac-10 wanted a game so badly, it added Utah
                              -Berry Trammel, 12/3/10

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by nikuman View Post
                                I'm no doctor, but of I have anything weird going on with my actual foot I call it quits and run another day.
                                Yeah, that seems like a pretty good rule. Foot stuff is rarely benign.
                                At least the Big Ten went after a big-time addition in Nebraska; the Pac-10 wanted a game so badly, it added Utah
                                -Berry Trammel, 12/3/10

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X