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  • The Prime Rib (and other beef) Thread

    I don't want to further defile the good name of prime rib by talking about it in a thread that has a poultry title, so this is a thread for buying and cooking prime rib and other beef.

    kccougar asked for some advice on prime rib in another fowl thread, so here goes. Prime rib is easy. Rub it, sear it for 20 minutes at 450 or higher, then turn the heat down to 325 and cook it 15 minutes per pound, or until the inside temp is 110-120. Take it out and let it sit for 15 minutes or so, until the inside temp is 120, cut it into 3/4 inch slices and don't stack the slices on the serving tray. Done. They say rare is 140, but they're lying. 120 is perfect for rare meat.
    Last edited by cowboy; 11-29-2011, 09:53 AM.
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  • #2
    Originally posted by cowboy View Post
    I don't want to further defile the good name of prime rib by talking about it in a thread that has a poultry title, so this is a thread for buying and cooking prime rib and other beef.

    kccougar asked for some advice on prime rib on another fowl thread, so here goes. Prime rib is easy. Rub it, sear it for 20 minutes at 450 or higher, then turn the heat down to 325 and cook it 15 minutes per pound, or until the inside temp is 110-120. Take it out and let it sit for 15 minutes or so, until the inside temp is 120, cut it into 3/4 inch slices and don't stack the slices on the serving tray. Done. They say rare is 140, but they're lying. 120 is perfect for rare meat.
    What do you rub it with?
    "It's devastating, because we lost to a team that's not even in the Pac-12. To lose to Utah State is horrible." - John White IV

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    • #3
      Originally posted by kccougar View Post
      What do you rub it with?
      Salt, pepper, and garlic salt. I'm kind of a minimalist when it comes to rub, but I believe it's really hard to put too much salt on a roast. A prime rib is so large, and there is so much fat on the outer layer that the rub doesn't really affect the meat, but it makes really tasty drippings and snacking treats.
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      "Outlined against a blue, gray
      October sky the Four Horsemen rode again"
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      • #4
        Originally posted by cowboy View Post
        cook it 15 minutes per pound, or until the inside temp is 110-120. Take it out and let it sit for 15 minutes or so, until the inside temp is 120,
        Unless your kitchen temperature is quite toasty, I don't see how this is physically possible.

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        • #5
          I was at Wal-Mart yesterday and they over ordered special cuts of meat. I got a 5.2 lbs. boneless prime rib roast (USDA: Choice) for $32. I could cut it into steaks, but, I've never done a prime rib roast before.

          I'd appreciate your suggestions. My birthday is Sunday, and I'm going to make this for my family.
          "Yeah, but never trust a Ph.D who has an MBA as well. The PhD symbolizes intelligence and discipline. The MBA symbolizes lust for power." -- Katy Lied

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Katy Lied View Post
            Unless your kitchen temperature is quite toasty, I don't see how this is physically possible.
            I'm no physicist, but I've always assumed it works this way: The outer part of the roast is >200 degrees when you take it out, and while some of that heat dissipates into the kitchen, but some of it is absorbed by the core of the ribeye and continues to cook the eye another 5-15 degrees as it is sitting there. Regardless, I'll testify that the inside temp continues to rise after you take it out of the oven.
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            "Outlined against a blue, gray
            October sky the Four Horsemen rode again"
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            • #7
              Originally posted by Katy Lied View Post
              Unless your kitchen temperature is quite toasty, I don't see how this is physically possible.
              Carryover heat. This is why you should take out all large hunks of meat from the oven 5 or 10 degrees before they reach the target temperature and let them rest a while.

              When you take out a roast, the thermometer (if you put it in right) is measuring the temp in the middle of the roast. Nearer to the outside of the roast, the temp is higher. The resting period allows the roast to reach equilibrium, during which time the temp of the interior will continue to rise.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by wuapinmon View Post
                I was at Wal-Mart yesterday and they over ordered special cuts of meat. I got a 5.2 lbs. boneless prime rib roast (USDA: Choice) for $32. I could cut it into steaks, but, I've never done a prime rib roast before.

                I'd appreciate your suggestions. My birthday is Sunday, and I'm going to make this for my family.
                Follow the instructions in my first post, and you'll do fine. Remember that pulling it out too soon is better than keeping it in too long, as you can always do the boiling au jus flash cook. BTW, that is a smoking deal for a choice rib.
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                October sky the Four Horsemen rode again"
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by cowboy View Post
                  Follow the instructions in my first post, and you'll do fine. Remember that pulling it out too soon is better than keeping it in too long, as you can always do the boiling au jus flash cook. BTW, that is a smoking deal for a choice rib.
                  They had about 20 more. Would you go and get another one if you had the cash? Is boneless better than bone-in?
                  "Yeah, but never trust a Ph.D who has an MBA as well. The PhD symbolizes intelligence and discipline. The MBA symbolizes lust for power." -- Katy Lied

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by TripletDaddy View Post
                    kccougar, i just cooked one two weeks ago. It came out perfectly.

                    I followed this guys instructions. They are extremely thorough and I found them to be spot on. Basically impossible to screw up if you follow the simple directions.

                    http://whatscookingamerica.net/Beef/ClassicPrimeRib.htm

                    The main thing I found was bringing the roast to room temp before you put it in the oven. Less cook time means less time to dry out. Also, I didn't salt the outside of the roast. That thing was leaking juice all over the place when I cut it. It was like a bloodbath. Awesome. I did use a simple garlic rub which added a nice flavor to the outside. The next time I might do some garlic injection with a needle. Anyone ever done that with their rib roast?

                    Finally, goes without saying, but use temp probes. Monitor that temp religiously. I went to the spice spoon store your recommended and picked up a dual probe remote therm. Worked like a charm.
                    Originally posted by kccougar View Post
                    Thanks! Questions:

                    1. How long did you leave the roast out before putting it in the oven?

                    2. I assume you bought it at Costco?

                    3. Did you insert your probe at the beginning of the cooking or did you wait until near the end of the recommended cook time?

                    4. During the set time after removing the roast fromt the oven, did you leave it uncovered?
                    Originally posted by TripletDaddy View Post
                    1. I bought a huge roast so I had mine out for approx 3-4 hours. I asked the butcher and he said that it would be fine.

                    2. I didn't buy at Costco because they were out the evening I went. I went to the butcher at the mega Smiths in Highland. The meat was a nice cut but Im pretty sure next time I will still go to costco. they have high quality beef. I was still very pleased with the results at Smiths. I think the roast cost me around $50.

                    3. I had the probe in there the entire time, even while it was coming to room temp prior to cooking.

                    4. I did whatever the instructions said to do. I either put a lid on the roasting pan or covered the roast in foil. Or both. As cowboy mentioned, watch the therm. The temp of the roast will continue to rise after you remove it from the oven. I let my roast sit for a good 20 mins and it rose probably another 6-8 degrees.

                    120 is the shiz. I love rare prime rib. In fact, I am not sure why you would ever eat prime rib anything but rare. but my wife and my in laws like it more cooked, so next time, I might let it pop to 125 in the oven and then remove and rise to 130 or so. I prefer not to, but all the juicy loveliness was too pink for some in my home. boo!

                    I will copy and paste this in the prime rib thread, too.
                    Everything in its right place.
                    Last edited by TripletDaddy; 11-29-2011, 10:40 AM.
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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by cowboy View Post
                      I'm no physicist, but I've always assumed it works this way: The outer part of the roast is >200 degrees when you take it out, and while some of that heat dissipates into the kitchen, but some of it is absorbed by the core of the ribeye and continues to cook the eye another 5-15 degrees as it is sitting there. Regardless, I'll testify that the inside temp continues to rise after you take it out of the oven.
                      That makes sense

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by wuapinmon View Post
                        They had about 20 more. Would you go and get another one if you had the cash? Is boneless better than bone-in?
                        Yes. Beef is going to get more expensive, so I'd buy a couple at that price if they are for sure USDA Choice. Shrink wrap with a food saver and toss them in the freezer. I like bone in for a roast and boneless if I'm going to cut them into steaks. If you are going to make steaks, thaw it out and stick it in the back of your fridge for a week before you cut it.
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                        "Outlined against a blue, gray
                        October sky the Four Horsemen rode again"
                        Grantland Rice, 1924

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                        • #13
                          Great thread. I have never done a prime rib. I think I will give it a shot this year for Christmas.

                          For those of you that enjoy horseradish sauce with your prime rib, this is a great recipe (I use it with my chuck roasts).

                          Horseradish Sauce

                          Ingredients
                          2 tablespoons prepared horseradish
                          1 tablespoon cider vinegar
                          1 teaspoon dry mustard <-- I subsituted grey poupon
                          3 tablespoons reduced-fat mayonnaise
                          1/8 teaspoon ground red pepper <-- I omitted this
                          1/2 cup nonfat sour cream

                          Directions
                          In a small bowl whisk together horseradish, vinegar, mustard, mayonnaise, ground red pepper and sour cream.
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                          • #14
                            In addition to the ham, I'm doing an 8 lb loin roast for the extended family Christmas party this year, I wanted to to a standing rib roast but it was $1.50 a lb more. It is shink wrapped and sitting in the freezer as we speak.

                            As to the question about bone in vs boneless - I think the Bones gives the roast more flavor and more importantly my meat cutter father does also. So when ever we have an expensive roast it is always bone in.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by cowboy View Post
                              Yes. Beef is going to get more expensive, so I'd buy a couple at that price if they are for sure USDA Choice. Shrink wrap with a food saver and toss them in the freezer. I like bone in for a roast and boneless if I'm going to cut them into steaks. If you are going to make steaks, thaw it out and stick it in the back of your fridge for a week before you cut it.
                              Okay, so I bought $150 in meat from Wal-Mart just now. 3 turkeys, 2 chickens, 2 lbs of milanesa steaks, a 9 lb bone-in ribeye roast, and a 6 lb bone-in ribeye roast. All of it was on sale. We're going to give turkeys to our HT/VT families since they were so cheap. The big ribeye roast may just be Christmas dinner. I've got two to practice on.
                              "Yeah, but never trust a Ph.D who has an MBA as well. The PhD symbolizes intelligence and discipline. The MBA symbolizes lust for power." -- Katy Lied

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