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  • #16
    Originally posted by clackamascoug View Post
    No one cares about my negative dog attitude. They make your house smell of urine - the problem is you get used to it - and everybody else who comes to your home feels like they got a pencil shoved up their nose. No thanks. Easy pass on filth, and picking up turds.
    Dogs are cool. The emotional intelligence they possess is fascinating. But I have grown a little bitter towards dog owners lately. My son has a pretty bad allergy to dogs. It triggers his asthma and has gotten us into some trouble. It seems like dog owners over the past couple of years have become comfortable taking their dogs everywhere now. Home depot, grocery stores, restaurants, etc. The park closest to us is over run with dog poop that doesn't get cleaned up. And people walk around with their dogs without a leash and get annoyed at us for shooing them away. The lack of basic awareness and manners has gotten old real fast.

    But in keeping with the thread, dog breeds that need hair cuts are the best because my son doesn't react to them as much.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by USUC View Post
      Dogs are cool. The emotional intelligence they possess is fascinating. But I have grown a little bitter towards dog owners lately. My son has a pretty bad allergy to dogs. It triggers his asthma and has gotten us into some trouble. It seems like dog owners over the past couple of years have become comfortable taking their dogs everywhere now. Home depot, grocery stores, restaurants, etc. The park closest to us is over run with dog poop that doesn't get cleaned up. And people walk around with their dogs without a leash and get annoyed at us for shooing them away. The lack of basic awareness and manners has gotten old real fast.

      But in keeping with the thread, dog breeds that need hair cuts are the best because my son doesn't react to them as much.
      We have a young man in our ward who is life threatening levels of allergic to dogs.

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      • #18
        Keeshonds are smart, highly trainable, and have a wonderful temperament. They are so friendly that people are advised not to use them as guard dogs.

        I like dogs. Dog owners can be a menace on a number of levels.
        Last edited by Sleeping in EQ; 12-28-2020, 10:47 AM.
        We all trust our own unorthodoxies.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Non Sequitur View Post
          As someone who has owned show dogs and has been to dozens of dog shows and become familiar with many breeds, I have a lot of first hand knowledge of different breeds. My opinion on the dogs mentioned in this thread: Cocker Spaniels are notorious biters, not aggressive biters but defense biters. Not a good breed if you have young children. Border Collies are one of the smartest breeds you'll find, but they require a ton of exercise. Not a great indoor dog. Boston Terriers have a lot of health problems and pant and pant and pant. Annoying as hell. Don't know anything about the Goombah dog, because it's not an AKC breed. German Shepards are very smart dogs, but I wouldn't recommend them unless you're experienced with dogs. Vizslas are cool, but they also require a ton of exercise. Interesting tidbit about Vizslas...they were originally bred to hunt deer. The technique they were trained to employ was to get underneath the deer and bring it down by the testicles. Or so I've read. Jack Russell terriers are yappy and stubborn. Most terriers are stubborn and they're notorious diggers. Wheaton terriers are cool dogs, and I came very close to owning one. I've owned several different dog breeds, and my favorite was probably our Rhodesian Ridgebacks. I would absolutely not recommend them for most people, but I loved them. I haven't owned a dog in over a dozen years, but I think if I were ever to get dog again, I would probably get a Norwich Terrier or a Havanese.
          :::Filed away under CS Dog Expert:::

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Bo Diddley View Post
            We have a young man in our ward who is life threatening levels of allergic to dogs.
            Yikes, that sounds awful. Luckily my son's reactions have not gotten to this level. He is pretty savvy at this point in not getting into situations where he will have contact for long. We hope he'll grow out of it. Allergy shots arent an option yet due to his age. This isn't dog owner's fault by any means, I just wish there was a little bit more boundaries in regards to public spaces and people's need to not be separated from their dogs. And what justification can people have to think its ok not to pick up your dog's poop?

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Scott R Nelson View Post


              Decades later, my son lived with a group of guys in college and one had a Border Collie. He liked that dog so much that he got one for himself (named Dexter). You can easily tell that this dog is smarter than the average dog. When he was younger you could play fetch with him and he would fetch the ball and return it right to your feet a hundred times and still be ready for more. Now that he's older, he'll do it a dozen times or so, then stop part way back to rest a bit. But if you tell him to bring it back to you he will - right away. And if he drops it a bit out of reach, you just point at your feet and he'll move the ball closer to you. But he sheds, and needs a lot of exercise. Like, he has to run several miles a day to be happy. He loves the outdoors and the snow.


              I read an interesting study on Border Collies in National Geographic-- they are the smartest breed of dog and can do things other dogs cannot, such as recognize humans from photographs and distinguish/ identify colors (even though dogs are what we would consider to be colorblind). It's a dog you can say "Bring me the green frisbee" that can actually know what you're talking about and obey. I played a full on game of tetherball with a border collie once; I felt like it was pretty competitive, too. Those dogs are too smart to be stuck with a bad owner, which is why I would never get one unless I had the perfect situation. (like not living in the hot part of Arizona for starters).

              Growing up in Idaho we had a beautiful Samoyed. The dog hated the summer and shed its coat by rubbing up against our bushes, leaving masses of white cotton dog hair for me to collect in plastic grocery bags (as one my childhood chores). Those dogs came alive in the winter, though, and it would have so much fun playing with us in the snow as we forged "foxes and geese" trails in our yard and built snowmen. She practically danced everywhere she went in the winter when snow was on the ground.

              For indoor living, I recommend a Maltese-- very fun, non-smelly dogs who don't need to be walked-- they burn around the house and get enough exercise doing that. They are a bit of upkeep, since they need to be regularly groomed so that their fur doesn't mat.

              I actually have a mix Sphynx/Devon Rex cat. I consider myself a dog person, but this cat is awesome. Playful, very social-- borderline needy--, and loves to perch on your shoulder like a monkey if you're unsuspectingly trying to get something done on the computer or watch tv. Oh-- and no shedding or allergies.
              "I'm anti, can't no government handle a commando / Your man don't want it, Trump's a bitch! I'll make his whole brand go under,"

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Commando View Post
                I read an interesting study on Border Collies in National Geographic-- they are the smartest breed of dog and can do things other dogs cannot, such as recognize humans from photographs and distinguish/ identify colors (even though dogs are what we would consider to be colorblind). It's a dog you can say "Bring me the green frisbee" that can actually know what you're talking about and obey. I played a full on game of tetherball with a border collie once; I felt like it was pretty competitive, too. Those dogs are too smart to be stuck with a bad owner, which is why I would never get one unless I had the perfect situation. (like not living in the hot part of Arizona for starters).
                When I was a teenager, we ended up with my uncle's border collie after he died, but after my alcoholic cousin had him for a year. He was extremely smart and gentle. I loved that dog. But he had clear PTSD from abuse at the hands of my cousin and suffered from depression after my uncle was gone. The vet told us they are the most prone to anxiety and depression due to their intelligence. I'd like to think we provided a good home for him (lots of attention, a lot of land to run around on) but he was anxious until the end.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by USUC View Post
                  When I was a teenager, we ended up with my uncle's border collie after he died, but after my alcoholic cousin had him for a year. He was extremely smart and gentle. I loved that dog. But he had clear PTSD from abuse at the hands of my cousin and suffered from depression after my uncle was gone. The vet told us they are the most prone to anxiety and depression due to their intelligence. I'd like to think we provided a good home for him (lots of attention, a lot of land to run around on) but he was anxious until the end.
                  Interesting. What does depression in a dog look like?
                  "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
                  "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.
                  "Juilliardk N I ibuprofen Hyu I U unhurt u" - creekster

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
                    Interesting. What does depression in a dog look like?
                    He had bouts of being withdrawn, not wanting to play, and looking past you when talking to him. But the depression wasn't constant like the anxiety. If you made quick movements around him he would jump. Pick a broom or a shovel, he jumped. Obviously from living with my cousin.

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