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Thread: 2017 Le Grand Boucle Rides again

  1. #1
    It is NOT a monkey! creekster's Avatar
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    Default 2017 Le Grand Boucle Rides again

    It's time for the Tour de France! This Saturday the french start it up all over again. This time they apparently wanted to do a proper demonstration of real french speed and so they are starting in germany surrounded by Germans and running away as fast as possible. This route will also give them the chance to showcase Belgium's role in most European land wars: sit still and watch the foreigners roll across you at will.

    Any thoughts about the race this year? ANy interest in a contest at all? I am happy to cede it to someone with more energy than me, or I could do a simplified version, or we could just comment once in a while here. Drop your thoughts (or not) and we can let the market place of bad jokes and semi-informed comments decide.
    PLesa excuse the tpyos.

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    Semper infra dignitatem PaloAltoCougar's Avatar
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    Candidly, I'm indifferent to having a contest, although I suppose it would be good to recirculate the highly coveted Creekster Trophy. Is bluegoose sitting on that at the moment? If a contest is held, I will participate, if only to make the more knowledgeable feel even better about themselves.

    Regardless, I am definitely not indifferent to your running commentary on the various stages, and hope trust you'll continue to provide those.

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    One man.....one pie Moliere's Avatar
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    I don't really care if their is a contest. I'd participate if there is one, though.

    I do love overall predictions. Froome has to be the favorite again, but he didn't look spectacular in the Dauphine. With shorter and less flat time trials, maybe a climber (nairo) can win. It certainly hurts people like Dumoulin, who's not even riding. Porte looks to be in good shape after his narrow defeat in the Dauphine. Contador is too old to threaten the overall. Same with Nibali (he might not even ride). Maybe Aru or fuglsang or Yates can challenge.




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    Huge Member BigPiney's Avatar
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    because creek loves the french riders:



    Man, these guys are dorks.

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    It is NOT a monkey! creekster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigPiney View Post
    because creek loves the french riders:



    Man, these guys are dorks.
    That was sort of amusing. They really are dorks and not all of them are even French. Ha.
    PLesa excuse the tpyos.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigPiney View Post
    because creek loves the french riders:



    Man, these guys are dorks.
    I've seen dorkier. Nice share.
    "Guitar groups are on their way out, Mr Epstein."

    Upon rejecting the Beatles, Dick Rowe told Brian Epstein of the January 1, 1962 audition for Decca, which signed Brian Poole and the Tremeloes instead.

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    it's all a blur mtnbiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moliere View Post
    I don't really care if their is a contest. I'd participate if there is one, though.

    I do love overall predictions. Froome has to be the favorite again, but he didn't look spectacular in the Dauphine. With shorter and less flat time trials, maybe a climber (nairo) can win. It certainly hurts people like Dumoulin, who's not even riding. Porte looks to be in good shape after his narrow defeat in the Dauphine. Contador is too old to threaten the overall. Same with Nibali (he might not even ride). Maybe Aru or fuglsang or Yates can challenge.
    I'm also indifferent toward a contest. Probably because there just hasn't been all that much coverage of races the last few years. Froome does seeme a little more vulnerable, but I don't see Quintana winning. The Giro has to have taken too much out of him. I don't think riders can double up on the grand tours anymore. I don't think Porte has what it takes; he always has a really bad day or two, and you just can't win a tour and have any really bad days. Maybe this is a year that a nobody steps up and stuns everyone. (What am I saying? It's not an individual race anymore; you have to have a full team working together to win.)

    So... how about the proposal to limit grand tours to only 8 riders per team instead of 9? How might that affect the outcomes?

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    One man.....one pie Moliere's Avatar
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    The first four days have been quite interesting. Froome has gone down twice in crashes but hasn't really been injured. Thomas has gone down twice as well while wearing the yellow jersey. The rain on the first day caused numerous crashes on the time trial, most notably Valverde, who was taken to the hospital and was out of the TdF almost 10 minutes into the first stage.

    Today, the organizers thought it would be fun to have a final sprint that requires two very sharp right turns right before the final straightaway. I remember a similar finale a couple years ago when the race came through London right down the Thames and then up Strand Street. There was a big crash back then and I figured there would be one today. jI even told my kids it would happen. They think I'm a prophet since there was not one but two crashes. The second crash was caused by Sagan, who basically pushed Cavendish into the barriers with his elbow. Looks like the race organizers are kicking Sagan out of the TdF this year for the elbow. I saw it live and they showed a couple replays and I wondered if they'd do anything to Sagan becasue the push was fairly blatant. Sure enough, he's out and won't be able to defend the green jersey.

    All the big names are still within a minute of each other, but of course Froome is in second place and has a good 30 seconds on his closest rivals. They hit the alps later this week and I don't expect too much to happen, but Col du Chat will be interesting this weekend. It's odd they won't finish at the top, but will instead have to descend and then have a couple kilometers of flat road before finishing. I wonder how much of a risk some of the riders will take on that descent. It could get ugly.
    "Discipleship is not a spectator sport. We cannot expect to experience the blessing of faith by standing inactive on the sidelines any more than we can experience the benefits of health by sitting on a sofa watching sporting events on television and giving advice to the athletes. And yet for some, “spectator discipleship” is a preferred if not primary way of worshipping." -Pres. Uchtdorf

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    Members Only Dwight Schr-ute's Avatar
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    I almost started a thread yesterday. A lot going on so far. One of the great things though was Taylor Phinney's big day one Stage 2 off the front. Love seeing him back in the peloton.



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    it's all a blur mtnbiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moliere View Post
    The second crash was caused by Sagan, who basically pushed Cavendish into the barriers with his elbow. Looks like the race organizers are kicking Sagan out of the TdF this year for the elbow. I saw it live and they showed a couple replays and I wondered if they'd do anything to Sagan becasue the push was fairly blatant. Sure enough, he's out and won't be able to defend the green jersey.
    I disagree with that assessment, and with Sagan's DQ. Sagan drifted a bit to the right toward the barriers, but that was partly due to Demare's drifting across his path from right to left, as well as another rider to Sagan's left squeezing toward him. Cav ducked his head and shoulder into Sagan before Sagan's elbow came out. Cav was even unclipping from his pedal by the time you can see the elbow extend. It was just too tight for Cavendish to come up the outside like that, although riders try it all the time, all too frequently with similar results. I've seen a lot worse from both Cavendish and Sagan, without them being disqualified. I know the organizers are trying to crack down, but this is ridiculous. It's partly their own fault for having sprint finishes on such narrow roads in the first place.

  11. #11
    It is NOT a monkey! creekster's Avatar
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    Default 2017 Le Grand Boucle Rides again

    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker View Post
    I disagree with that assessment, and with Sagan's DQ. Sagan drifted a bit to the right toward the barriers, but that was partly due to Demare's drifting across his path from right to left, as well as another rider to Sagan's left squeezing toward him. Cav ducked his head and shoulder into Sagan before Sagan's elbow came out. Cav was even unclipping from his pedal by the time you can see the elbow extend. It was just too tight for Cavendish to come up the outside like that, although riders try it all the time, all too frequently with similar results. I've seen a lot worse from both Cavendish and Sagan, without them being disqualified. I know the organizers are trying to crack down, but this is ridiculous. It's partly their own fault for having sprint finishes on such narrow roads in the first place.
    I think mtnbiker has it right. Cav pushed into Sagans hip and that's why Sagan pushed out his elbow. The DQ is a joke. Cav has done a LOT worse before.

    This article agrees. http://www.velonews.com/2017/07/comm...dsq_442744/amp

    First Sagan is D Q d and then Hayward goes to Boston. Worst sports 4th of July ever.
    PLesa excuse the tpyos.

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    Known Heterosexual RC Vikings's Avatar
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    Cavendish got in a bad spot and tried to squeeze into a hole that wasn't there. Ochowicz was laying blame on Sagan by saying he's a pro and knows he should be holding his line there but to me it just looked like there wasn't room. Cavendish didn't have a problem with Sagan coming over, just the elbow.

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    Semper infra dignitatem PaloAltoCougar's Avatar
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    Watching today's stage (11) was bittersweet. It ran through the Dordogne River Valley where we've vacationed a couple of times, including riding bikes along a good portion of today's route. The length and climb aren't remarkable, but I don't think there's a more beautiful area on the planet. Seeing them ride past places where we've stayed, dined and visited was awesome, but it made me more than a little sad that I'll very likely never ride there again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PaloAltoCougar View Post
    Watching today's stage (11) was bittersweet. It ran through the Dordogne River Valley where we've vacationed a couple of times, including riding bikes along a good portion of today's route. The length and climb aren't remarkable, but I don't think there's a more beautiful area on the planet. Seeing them ride past places where we've stayed, dined and visited was awesome, but it made me more than a little sad that I'll very likely never ride there again.
    Did you visit Notre Dame des Cyclistes?

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    Known Heterosexual RC Vikings's Avatar
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    Sky is looking like Postal back in the day, a 1st lieutenant leading the way up the mountain looking like he could win given the chance. Thomas goes out of the race and they've got a couple of other guys to take their place.

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    One man.....one pie Moliere's Avatar
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    Excellent stage today. I just finished watching and it's nice to have some drama finally after Froome's domination. I was giong to post three days ago that I think Aru might have a shot but of course I didn't and now I don't look like the savant that I could have looked like . I'm no real fan of any particular cyclist so it's nice to have the top 4 riders within 35 seconds of each other and Aru really does look strong. Froome cracked pretty bad at the end and lost those 20 seconds but like RC said, it's crazy that Sky had two guys with Froome up until the end and Landa even beat Froome by a good 15 seconds. Contador looks old, but of course he's also a bit banged up. Nairo looks like he just rode a grand tour recently, which he did. Bardet is giving the French some false hope.

    Mostly just hilly or flat stages until Wednesday when they have a HC climb to a downhill finish. Then Thursday is another mountain top finish. If Aru wants a chance, he's going to have to put more time into Froome given the 23km relatively flat time trial on stage 20.
    "Discipleship is not a spectator sport. We cannot expect to experience the blessing of faith by standing inactive on the sidelines any more than we can experience the benefits of health by sitting on a sofa watching sporting events on television and giving advice to the athletes. And yet for some, “spectator discipleship” is a preferred if not primary way of worshipping." -Pres. Uchtdorf

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    One man.....one pie Moliere's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moliere View Post
    Mostly just hilly or flat stages until Wednesday when they have a HC climb to a downhill finish. Then Thursday is another mountain top finish. If Aru wants a chance, he's going to have to put more time into Froome given the 23km relatively flat time trial on stage 20.
    Boy was I wrong. Friday was a fantastic stage. Contador decided to attack early and Nairo decided to join him. It's crazy that they put 2 mins into the yellow group, but probably won't make a difference regardless. But the stage was fun to watch. Then today, on a fairly benign stage, Aru somehow loses 20+ seconds and also loses the yellow jersey. I have no idea what he was doing so far back in the peloton but it cost him big time. Maybe he had an off day or maybe he's saving it for tomorrow, which is a pretty crazy stage with some decent climbs but a longer downhill finish. I do wonder if any GC guys will attack early given the lack of flats they could hold the lead if they get some help.

    Kudos to whomever setup this years route. It's been fun and well thought out so far.
    "Discipleship is not a spectator sport. We cannot expect to experience the blessing of faith by standing inactive on the sidelines any more than we can experience the benefits of health by sitting on a sofa watching sporting events on television and giving advice to the athletes. And yet for some, “spectator discipleship” is a preferred if not primary way of worshipping." -Pres. Uchtdorf

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    it's all a blur mtnbiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moliere View Post
    Boy was I wrong. Friday was a fantastic stage. Contador decided to attack early and Nairo decided to join him. It's crazy that they put 2 mins into the yellow group, but probably won't make a difference regardless. But the stage was fun to watch. Then today, on a fairly benign stage, Aru somehow loses 20+ seconds and also loses the yellow jersey. I have no idea what he was doing so far back in the peloton but it cost him big time. Maybe he had an off day or maybe he's saving it for tomorrow, which is a pretty crazy stage with some decent climbs but a longer downhill finish. I do wonder if any GC guys will attack early given the lack of flats they could hold the lead if they get some help.

    Kudos to whomever setup this years route. It's been fun and well thought out so far.
    Aru lost 2 big-time teammates who were supposed to help him in the climbing stages. Cataldo and Fuglsang crashed out. Still, he had a teammate who was trying to keep him clear and toward the front yesterday, but said that he looked back and Aru wasn't there anymore. The teammate sounded pretty disgusted that Aru didn't follow him. But without Cataldo and Fuglsang, he probably didn't have much of a chance for yellow in Paris anyway.

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    Known Heterosexual RC Vikings's Avatar
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    Today was an enjoyable stage. I don't think I've ever seen a tour rider serpentine up a climb before until this stage. These 15 to 20 percent short climbs are causing some havoc.

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    Semper infra dignitatem PaloAltoCougar's Avatar
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    There have been some interesting stages with surprising results. I'm still ignorant about many of the elements and subtleties of pro cycling, though. This year's tour planners said they wanted to make it more interesting with more surprises, and the commentators have been talking about that and how going into each stage there would be a lot of unpredictablity. How do they know this? I understand why some routes favor climbers and flat routes favor sprinters, of course, but I'm lost on how they know that specific routes favor some climbers others, and sprinters over other sprinters. I guess one really needs to understand the specific strengths and weakness of each rider, as to which I'm hopeless.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PaloAltoCougar View Post
    There have been some interesting stages with surprising results. I'm still ignorant about many of the elements and subtleties of pro cycling, though. This year's tour planners said they wanted to make it more interesting with more surprises, and the commentators have been talking about that and how going into each stage there would be a lot of unpredictablity. How do they know this? I understand why some routes favor climbers and flat routes favor sprinters, of course, but I'm lost on how they know that specific routes favor some climbers others, and sprinters over other sprinters. I guess one really needs to understand the specific strengths and weakness of each rider, as to which I'm hopeless.
    Some of the climbers are good at short steep climbs, while other master long steady climbs.

    Sprinters that are accustomed to truly flat sprints as opposed to those that have some modest climbs is how I interpret it.
    "Guitar groups are on their way out, Mr Epstein."

    Upon rejecting the Beatles, Dick Rowe told Brian Epstein of the January 1, 1962 audition for Decca, which signed Brian Poole and the Tremeloes instead.

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