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  1. #271

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    It's awesome how Crockett has the Doner shacks scoped out all over Germany. It's actually invaluable information. Doners are cheap and some are really tasty, and others will give you fiarrhea.
    Part of it is based on academic grounds. Among major conferences, the Pac-10 is the best academically, largely because of Stanford, Cal and UCLA. “Colorado is on a par with Oregon,” he said. “Utah isn’t even in the picture.”

  2. #272
    Senior Member Crockett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Color Me Badd Fan View Post
    I spent quite a bit of time on my mission in Heidelberg. The castle is kind of boring. I've also heard that Neuschwanstein is pretty lame. It was build after the civil war.

    My parents went on a trip to Germany last year and have a few tourist books hanging around. There's a place called Eltz Castle that I didn't even know was in my mission. It's around the Koblenz area where I never spent any significant amount of time. Unlike Heidelberg, it will be off the beaten path.

    I recently heard about this. Totally off the radar for most. I'd like to go sometime.

  3. #273
    Board Bookworm happyone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaloAltoCougar View Post
    If pretty much any else on this board had asked me that, I'd dismiss the snark and go Julie Andrews (see below) on them. But you are a man among boys and without guile, so I can simply answer, "Yes." More than fifty years after the movie, it's still a booming business in Salzburg.



    In my feeble defense, it's been literally been 45 yrs (fall of '72) since I've been there and neither of my brothers (who were stationed in Germany as late as the '00s during their military careers) were around to ask

    As for Heidelberg, The castle is literally a ruin, kind of like Kennilworth in England if you're familiar with it - IRRC Napoleon destroyed it. They have some fantastic fireworks shows with it as a background if you're there at the right time. Also the US Army has pulled out so you probably won't run into many "ugly Americans"
    Last edited by happyone; 10-06-2017 at 02:10 PM.

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  4. #274

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    The NWC Family European trip, thought dead in 2017, was just completed in the UK. After two weeks of walking in England, Wales, and Scotland, we are exhausted. But it was a great trip.

    Highlights:

    Oxford area. A walking tour of Oxford, Stonehenge, and Bath. I loved Oxford. A vibrant area with a bunch of bike riders. I initially didn't want to do Stonehenge, but you gotta do it. It was interesting and worth it. Go in the morning for less tourists. And to really beat the crowds, go the day before summer equinox . We just spent half a day in Bath and did the Roman bath tour. Very interesting and a neat town, but I probably wouldn't go again.

    The Cotswolds. Probably my favorite. We stayed in Stow for 3 days. Loved the common architecture throughout the towns. We did a small hike to the Slaughters and Burton-on-the-Water, which led through some gorgeous scenery.

    Wales. Just a half day there, and I would have liked more. We went to the Llangwm and Usk area, mainly to see some sites from Mrs. NWC's clan. We were able to see the farmhouse that her family used to live in, as well as the medieval chapel they used to worship at. That was pretty cool. And the Usk Castle is free, not busy, and has lovely scenery.

    Edinburgh. 4 days here. Edinburgh Castle is great. Make time for the Scottish War Museum there. The hike up to Arthur's seat is highly recommended. It was about this time that we were losing a little steam walking around historical sites. We had initially decided against a highlands bus tour so we could go to Hollyrood Castle, but the kids really didn't have much appetite for another castle so we pivoted and did the bus. It's a long 12 hour tour, but it was a good option for us to see the highlands. I think there's enough up there for a multi-day trip, so we may be coming back.

    London for 4 days. If we were to plan again, I think we might have started at London. We were pretty tired by then and there's just so many things to do there. Our early morning wake-ups to see 2 sites a day plan quickly delved to late mornings and one site a day. Still, we saw the Tower of London, the British Historical Museum, and Westminster Abbey. All of these are highly recommended. I thought the Abbey was better than most of the big hitters in Italy. On our last night, 2 males were outvoted by 4 females, and we saw Wicked. It was actually a nice production. Would have loved to see so much more in London. The hop on hop off tour is recommended to get your bearings around town. Grateful we didn't drive in London.

    I'm so glad all of us went. The older kids got an appreciation for the history of it all. Even surly baby daughter enjoyed the sites. If this was the last hurrah for NWC family big vacations, we couldn't have done much better. I'm expecting Mrs. NWC and I will go back alone.

    A few general things:

    We Air bnb'd the whole trip. Had we not done so, we would have been renting 2 hotel rooms every night. Most owners are super helpful and courteous. It really is the best way to do family trips.

    Driving is nerve-racking there. We drove the first week of the trip, and it was only at the end where I felt somewhat comfortable. It's just really hard to do the opposite of what has been reflex for decades. If you drive there, make sure you have a patient navigator who is watching the roads as closely as you are. I was surprised at how many times I forgot to check the correct lane when turning. Don't bother with renting 'sat-navs'. Google or Apple maps work better than Garmin.

    For Flystripper and MP, cask ales are interesting to try, but flatter and warmer than regular tap beers. Try a couple at different places. Regular ales are good. I even had some decent local IPAs there.

  5. #275
    The dude abides Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Northwestcoug View Post
    The NWC Family European trip, thought dead in 2017, was just completed in the UK. After two weeks of walking in England, Wales, and Scotland, we are exhausted. But it was a great trip.
    Wow! Sounds like a fabulous trip.

    For my first driving experience in England I landed in London, rented a car, and drove to Wallingford. It was a stick so between shifting with my left hand, steering on the wrong side of the road, and navigating with a map (pre-GPS era), it was intense! Also, it was night-time.

    Took our kids there a few years ago and drove all over and had a blast.
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  6. #276
    lollygagger hostile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    Wow! Sounds like a fabulous trip.

    For my first driving experience in England I landed in London, rented a car, and drove to Wallingford. It was a stick so between shifting with my left hand, steering on the wrong side of the road, and navigating with a map (pre-GPS era), it was intense! Also, it was night-time.

    Took our kids there a few years ago and drove all over and had a blast.
    The UK has been the only place in Europe the I have driven and not received a random ticket from some automated radar speed control. Go England!
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  7. #277

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    Wow! Sounds like a fabulous trip.

    For my first driving experience in England I landed in London, rented a car, and drove to Wallingford. It was a stick so between shifting with my left hand, steering on the wrong side of the road, and navigating with a map (pre-GPS era), it was intense! Also, it was night-time.

    Took our kids there a few years ago and drove all over and had a blast.
    Yikes! That's a couple of levels of advancement I'm glad I didn't have to achieve.

    We had a van, so at least part of the stress was due to my wide berth. When we pulled into Waverly Station without an accident we counted ourselves lucky.

  8. #278
    Senior Member myboynoah's Avatar
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    Yeah, sounds awesome NW.
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  9. #279
    Semper infra dignitatem PaloAltoCougar's Avatar
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    Congrats on such a great trip, NW. if you don't mind reporting, what are the ages of your kids?

  10. #280

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    Quote Originally Posted by PaloAltoCougar View Post
    Congrats on such a great trip, NW. if you don't mind reporting, what are the ages of your kids?
    Oldest 23, youngest 15. With 2-3 years difference between each.

  11. #281
    Semper infra dignitatem PaloAltoCougar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Northwestcoug View Post
    Oldest 23, youngest 15. With 2-3 years difference between each.
    Thx. When we did Europe with kids we only took those older than 14 or so, leaving younger ones behind with relatives (to everyone's delight, except perhaps the relatives). Glad everyone had a good time.

  12. #282

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    Quote Originally Posted by PaloAltoCougar View Post
    Thx. When we did Europe with kids we only took those older than 14 or so, leaving younger ones behind with relatives (to everyone's delight, except perhaps the relatives). Glad everyone had a good time.
    Yeah, I don't think we would have done it with younger kids. As it was, the youngest two were always waiting at the end of the tour or museum for the more engaged ones. Still, I'm surprised at what they took in. My son couldn't wait to meet up with me at the National Museum. He took me up to an obscure corner which had a 15th century map of Venice which enthralled him. Didn't care too much for the Rosetta Stone, yet he spent 20 minutes studying an old map. Go figure.

  13. #283
    Senior Member BigFatMeanie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Northwestcoug View Post
    Yeah, I don't think we would have done it with younger kids. As it was, the youngest two were always waiting at the end of the tour or museum for the more engaged ones. Still, I'm surprised at what they took in. My son couldn't wait to meet up with me at the National Museum. He took me up to an obscure corner which had a 15th century map of Venice which enthralled him. Didn't care too much for the Rosetta Stone, yet he spent 20 minutes studying an old map. Go figure.
    Unless you can read ancient Greek, the Rosetta stone is pretty boring. The map is far more interesting with boats and bridges and canals and houses to look at.

  14. #284
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigFatMeanie View Post
    Unless you can read ancient Greek, the Rosetta stone is pretty boring. The map is far more interesting with boats and bridges and canals and houses to look at.
    Even if you can it is pretty boring. What's interesting about the Rosetta Stone is not the text per se, but the fact that the text is given in three different languages, including previously untranslatable Egyptian languages. It's interesting as a historical artifact.
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  15. #285

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    I love this thread.


    We had a family reunion 3 weeks ago in Utah and we spent half of it puking our guts out. 5 of the 6 in my family got the stomach bug (the 1 year old was the only one that made it through unscathed), 2 of my sisters got it and 12 nephews and nieces got it. Good times.

    We have a redo with a 10 day trip to California starting next week. It better be good.

  16. #286
    Senior Member Clark Addison's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LiveCoug View Post
    I love this thread.
    I do too, mostly because of how it started and what it has become. I chuckle every time I see it updated.

  17. #287

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clark Addison View Post
    I do too, mostly because of how it started and what it has become. I chuckle every time I see it updated.

  18. #288
    Board Bookworm happyone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    Wow! Sounds like a fabulous trip.

    For my first driving experience in England I landed in London, rented a car, and drove to Wallingford. It was a stick so between shifting with my left hand, steering on the wrong side of the road, and navigating with a map (pre-GPS era), it was intense! Also, it was night-time.

    Took our kids there a few years ago and drove all over and had a blast.
    Sounds like a great trip NWC

    When we went to England to visit my brother 10 yrs ago (it can't have been that long ), I just about killed my self and everyone else in the car entering a round-about and looking the wrong way. I didn't drive again on the trip

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  19. #289
    Senior Member Goatnapper'96's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Northwestcoug View Post
    The NWC Family European trip, thought dead in 2017, was just completed in the UK. After two weeks of walking in England, Wales, and Scotland, we are exhausted. But it was a great trip.

    Highlights:

    Oxford area. A walking tour of Oxford, Stonehenge, and Bath. I loved Oxford. A vibrant area with a bunch of bike riders. I initially didn't want to do Stonehenge, but you gotta do it. It was interesting and worth it. Go in the morning for less tourists. And to really beat the crowds, go the day before summer equinox . We just spent half a day in Bath and did the Roman bath tour. Very interesting and a neat town, but I probably wouldn't go again.

    The Cotswolds. Probably my favorite. We stayed in Stow for 3 days. Loved the common architecture throughout the towns. We did a small hike to the Slaughters and Burton-on-the-Water, which led through some gorgeous scenery.

    Wales. Just a half day there, and I would have liked more. We went to the Llangwm and Usk area, mainly to see some sites from Mrs. NWC's clan. We were able to see the farmhouse that her family used to live in, as well as the medieval chapel they used to worship at. That was pretty cool. And the Usk Castle is free, not busy, and has lovely scenery.

    Edinburgh. 4 days here. Edinburgh Castle is great. Make time for the Scottish War Museum there. The hike up to Arthur's seat is highly recommended. It was about this time that we were losing a little steam walking around historical sites. We had initially decided against a highlands bus tour so we could go to Hollyrood Castle, but the kids really didn't have much appetite for another castle so we pivoted and did the bus. It's a long 12 hour tour, but it was a good option for us to see the highlands. I think there's enough up there for a multi-day trip, so we may be coming back.

    London for 4 days. If we were to plan again, I think we might have started at London. We were pretty tired by then and there's just so many things to do there. Our early morning wake-ups to see 2 sites a day plan quickly delved to late mornings and one site a day. Still, we saw the Tower of London, the British Historical Museum, and Westminster Abbey. All of these are highly recommended. I thought the Abbey was better than most of the big hitters in Italy. On our last night, 2 males were outvoted by 4 females, and we saw Wicked. It was actually a nice production. Would have loved to see so much more in London. The hop on hop off tour is recommended to get your bearings around town. Grateful we didn't drive in London.

    I'm so glad all of us went. The older kids got an appreciation for the history of it all. Even surly baby daughter enjoyed the sites. If this was the last hurrah for NWC family big vacations, we couldn't have done much better. I'm expecting Mrs. NWC and I will go back alone.

    A few general things:

    We Air bnb'd the whole trip. Had we not done so, we would have been renting 2 hotel rooms every night. Most owners are super helpful and courteous. It really is the best way to do family trips.

    Driving is nerve-racking there. We drove the first week of the trip, and it was only at the end where I felt somewhat comfortable. It's just really hard to do the opposite of what has been reflex for decades. If you drive there, make sure you have a patient navigator who is watching the roads as closely as you are. I was surprised at how many times I forgot to check the correct lane when turning. Don't bother with renting 'sat-navs'. Google or Apple maps work better than Garmin.

    For Flystripper and MP, cask ales are interesting to try, but flatter and warmer than regular tap beers. Try a couple at different places. Regular ales are good. I even had some decent local IPAs there.
    My wife and I met at the Derby Chapel in '93 at some Zone Meeting. We went back in '98 after I was deployed to Bosnia. We finally made it back this summer and took the kids. It was a blast. We spent two days in London. London is great but not really England - just an international elite area. We then spent about a week in Matlock on the outskirts of the Derbyshire Dales/Peak District National Park. We loved it and the kids got a legit English experience as we rented a cottage that was less comfortable than any flat either of us lived in as Missionaries there 25 years ago. We did a bunch of castles and whatnot. We finished by driving up to Edinburgh. Old Town was great and I love the Scots. It is the origins of US Redneck culture and I have some ancestors from the various Clans. We didn't get to the Highlands but I think the wife and I are going to head back to Scotland for a week either next year or the year after for some time in Edinburgh and a few days in the Highlands as well.

    I don't recall struggling to drive there as a missionary, but it was a bit more nerve wracking this past go around. Vehicle was much bigger to accommodate the 6 of us but the roads situation is much better than it was 25 years ago as well. We did a lot of driving, I think the tank on our rental went for 500 miles and I filled it up twice so we must have gone close to 1800 miles when I finally turned it in at the Edinburgh airport, and it was often stressful. Regardless, we do love that country. We have yet to run out of Cadbury chocolate and we have been home since 10 June!
    Do Your Damnedest In An Ostentatious Manner All The Time!
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  20. #290
    One man.....one pie Moliere's Avatar
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    Am I the only CSer that didn’t take his family to England this year?
    "Discipleship is not a spectator sport. We cannot expect to experience the blessing of faith by standing inactive on the sidelines any more than we can experience the benefits of health by sitting on a sofa watching sporting events on television and giving advice to the athletes. And yet for some, “spectator discipleship” is a preferred if not primary way of worshipping." -Pres. Uchtdorf

  21. #291
    It is NOT a monkey! creekster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moliere View Post
    Am I the only CSer that didn’t take his family to England this year?
    No.
    PLesa excuse the tpyos.

  22. #292
    Senior Member Goatnapper'96's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moliere View Post
    Am I the only CSer that didn’t take his family to England this year?
    Since a dictatorship is imminent I recommend you head to the other side of the pond soon! BEAT SWEDEN, MATE!
    Do Your Damnedest In An Ostentatious Manner All The Time!
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    I'm choosing to mostly ignore your fatuity here and instead overwhelm you with so much data that you'll maybe, just maybe, realize that you have reams to read on this subject before you can contribute meaningfully to any conversation on this topic.
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  23. #293

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    Quote Originally Posted by Goatnapper'96 View Post
    My wife and I met at the Derby Chapel in '93 at some Zone Meeting. We went back in '98 after I was deployed to Bosnia. We finally made it back this summer and took the kids. It was a blast. We spent two days in London. London is great but not really England - just an international elite area. We then spent about a week in Matlock on the outskirts of the Derbyshire Dales/Peak District National Park. We loved it and the kids got a legit English experience as we rented a cottage that was less comfortable than any flat either of us lived in as Missionaries there 25 years ago. We did a bunch of castles and whatnot. We finished by driving up to Edinburgh. Old Town was great and I love the Scots. It is the origins of US Redneck culture and I have some ancestors from the various Clans. We didn't get to the Highlands but I think the wife and I are going to head back to Scotland for a week either next year or the year after for some time in Edinburgh and a few days in the Highlands as well.

    I don't recall struggling to drive there as a missionary, but it was a bit more nerve wracking this past go around. Vehicle was much bigger to accommodate the 6 of us but the roads situation is much better than it was 25 years ago as well. We did a lot of driving, I think the tank on our rental went for 500 miles and I filled it up twice so we must have gone close to 1800 miles when I finally turned it in at the Edinburgh airport, and it was often stressful. Regardless, we do love that country. We have yet to run out of Cadbury chocolate and we have been home since 10 June!
    LOL at the Cadbury situation at your house. Mrs. NWC is a Commonwealth citizen, and based on the quantity of Cadbury she buys I assume it's a law to get a certain quantity each year. In the UK, she bought some type of Cadbury every day...

    Glad you had a great family vacation. I'm sure we will be back, sans kids, as well.

  24. #294

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    The misses did not like the driving. She thought I was wreckless, but sometimes you just need to be aggressive. It didn't help that as a missionary I was taught to drive aggressively over there. Old habits I suppose.

  25. #295
    Bald not naked Pelado's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goatnapper'96 View Post
    We finished by driving up to Edinburgh. Old Town was great and I love the Scots. It is the origins of US Redneck culture...
    How so?
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  26. #296
    Semper infra dignitatem PaloAltoCougar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bo Diddley View Post
    The misses did not like the driving. She thought I was wreckless, but sometimes you just need to be aggressive. It didn't help that as a missionary I was taught to drive aggressively over there. Old habits I suppose.
    I've driven thousands of miles in the British Isles and thus far I've been wreckless.

  27. #297

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    Quote Originally Posted by PaloAltoCougar View Post
    I've driven thousands of miles in the British Isles and thus far I've been wreckless.

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