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Thread: The End of Football

  1. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vic Vega View Post
    You dropped a lot of knowledge there too. Cars ARE so yesterday and bikes ARE the future!!!!

    It is an interesting idea. It seems like it would be most popular in cold areas.
    I'm sure they could play with those kind of helmets in the south too. Think aobut the increase in peripheral vision!
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    Knock it off. This board has enough problems without a dose of middle-age lechery.

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  2. #62
    Board eye candy beefytee's Avatar
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    Looks like hockey players are looking for the same cut that the NFL players got:

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/former-...ions-1.2439840

    I think that hockey has much more room to adapt than football. If you take away the hits in hockey you still have an exciting fast paced game. Will it be the same? No, but it is still a viable sport.

    You can't take the hits away from football and still have much of a sport. I don't think you'll ever get much of an audience for 2 hand touch.

  3. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by beefytee View Post
    Looks like hockey players are looking for the same cut that the NFL players got:

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/former-...ions-1.2439840

    I think that hockey has much more room to adapt than football. If you take away the hits in hockey you still have an exciting fast paced game. Will it be the same? No, but it is still a viable sport.

    You can't take the hits away from football and still have much of a sport. I don't think you'll ever get much of an audience for 2 hand touch.
    Hmmmm. I wonder how many of these players played with antiquated helmet technology by their own choice. It's funny that hockey helmets have improved but many players, if not the majority of the players, continued wearing the same helmets that were popular in the seventies. I have one like them still in my hockey bag. How many of them refused to wear face masks or shields?

    Here's one of the helmets I'm writing about:

    18-4552.jpg

  4. #64
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    How Football Fleeces Taxpayers: Gregg Easterbrook on The King of Sports

    Whether you like football or not - whether you've ever bought a ticket to a high school, college, or NFL game - you're paying for it.


    That's one of the takeaways from The King of Sports: Football’s Impact on America, Gregg Easterbrook's fascinating new book on the cultural, economic, and political impact of America's most popular and lucrative sport.


    “The [state-supported] University of Maryland charges each...undergraduate $400 a year to subsidize the football program," says Easterbrook, who notes that only a half-dozen or so college teams are truly self-supporting. Even powerhouse programs such as the University of Florida's pull money from students and taxpayers. "They do it," he says, "because they can get away with it.”


    At the pro level, billionaire team owners such as Paul Allen of the Seattle Seahawks and Shahid Khan of the Jacksonville Jaguars benefit from publicly financed stadiums for which they pay little or nothing while reaping all revenue. Easterbrook also talks about how the lobbyists managed to get the NFL chartered as a nonprofit by amending tax codes designed for chambers of commerce and trade organizations.


    As ESPN.com's Tuesday Morning Quarterback columnist, Easterbrook absolutely loves football but also isn't slow to throw penalty flags at the game he thinks is uniquely America. In fact, he sees the hypocrisy at the center of the business of football as "one of the ways that football synchs [with] American culture....Everyone in football talks rock-ribbed conservatism, self-reliance. Then their economic structure is subsidies and guaranteed benefits. Isn't that America?"
    [...]
    http://reason.com/reasontv/2013/12/0...asterbrook-tac

    Hmm... it's still worth it.
    "If there is one thing I am, it's always right." -Ted Nugent.
    "I honestly believe saying someone is a smart lawyer is damning with faint praise. The smartest people become engineers and scientists." -SU.
    "I never preached in Texas, but I have preached in places as wicked..." -Brigham Young.
    "If we do nothing we'll be substantially behind (other Power leagues) a decade from now." -Bob Bowlsby on Big 12 expansion.
    GIVE 'EM HELL, BRIGHAM!

  5. #65
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    Should the NFL Lose Its Tax-Exempt Status?

    Times are good for the National Football League. Viewership is up. For the 47th year in a row, Harris Interactive named pro football the most popular sport in America. And with overall revenues north of $9 billion, the NFL is the most lucrative sports league on the planet.


    That's not enough for NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell. He wants to nearly triple the league's revenues to $25 billion by 2027—a mind-bogglingly large number. But here's an even more shocking fact: The NFL pays nothing in taxes on all those revenues. Not a nickel. And now the anti-corruption organization Rootstrikers wants to put an end to the NFL's free ride.


    Over the weekend, Rootstrikers blasted out an email urging people to sign a petition in support of Sen. Tom Coburn's (R-Okla.) PRO Sports Act, which would ban big sports leagues from receiving tax-exempt status. "You know the NFL as the National Football League," says the Rootstrikers email. "But the IRS knows them better as the Nonprofit Football League—that's because the NFL has not paid any taxes since 1966 and average Americans are left paying higher taxes to make up for that lost revenue. Senator [Tom] Coburn is trying to change that, and we support his endeavor." Coburn's bill would ban pro sports leagues with more than $10 million in revenue from receiving tax-exempt status.


    So, you might ask, how did the NFL score such a lucky deal in the first place? It's a classic tale of political influence and lobbying ingenious, as Gregg Easterbrook explains in an excerpt of his book The King of Sports: Football's Impact on America, published in the Atlantic:
    [...]
    http://www.motherjones.com/mojo/2013...-roger-goodell

    Hmm... it's still worth it.
    "If there is one thing I am, it's always right." -Ted Nugent.
    "I honestly believe saying someone is a smart lawyer is damning with faint praise. The smartest people become engineers and scientists." -SU.
    "I never preached in Texas, but I have preached in places as wicked..." -Brigham Young.
    "If we do nothing we'll be substantially behind (other Power leagues) a decade from now." -Bob Bowlsby on Big 12 expansion.
    GIVE 'EM HELL, BRIGHAM!

  6. #66
    Semper infra dignitatem PaloAltoCougar's Avatar
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    Ronney Jenkins' depression, attempted suicide and ongoing struggles are currently a front-page story on CNN. He attributes it to CTE but it can't be diagnosed until after he's dead. I hope he derives some pleasure from the knowledge he kept me and many thousands of others mightily entertained.

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Ted View Post
    Doesn't matter. The teams aren't nonprofit.
    τὸν ἥλιον ἀνατέλλοντα πλείονες ἢ δυόμενον προσκυνοῦσιν

  8. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by PaloAltoCougar View Post
    Ronney Jenkins' depression, attempted suicide and ongoing struggles are currently a front-page story on CNN. He attributes it to CTE but it can't be diagnosed until after he's dead. I hope he derives some pleasure from the knowledge he kept me and many thousands of others mightily entertained.
    Awful. That was hard to read.

  9. #69
    sweet triple TripletDaddy's Avatar
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    BYU fans should consider a class action suit against the school based on all the headaches bronco has given us over the years. I would cite apparent confusion amongst many of the players on the field and an overall increase in stupidity amongst the fan base as prima facie evidence.
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  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by All-American View Post
    Doesn't matter. The teams aren't nonprofit.
    I am not nonprofit either but would like tax-exempt status as well (even if it is for the first 10 million). Maybe I need to declare myself as a pro league.
    "If there is one thing I am, it's always right." -Ted Nugent.
    "I honestly believe saying someone is a smart lawyer is damning with faint praise. The smartest people become engineers and scientists." -SU.
    "I never preached in Texas, but I have preached in places as wicked..." -Brigham Young.
    "If we do nothing we'll be substantially behind (other Power leagues) a decade from now." -Bob Bowlsby on Big 12 expansion.
    GIVE 'EM HELL, BRIGHAM!

  11. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Ted View Post
    He wants to nearly triple the league's revenues to $25 billion by 2027
    this is a stupid argument and a stupid article. "the league" with revenue in the billions≠the tax exempt 501(c)(6).

    average Americans are left paying higher taxes to make up for that lost revenue
    the nfl is not a source of net economic loss at either the macro or franchise level. there's a reason why cities are willing to prostitute themselves out to even flirt with the idea of getting a franchise.
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  12. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Ted View Post
    I am not nonprofit either but would like tax-exempt status as well (even if it is for the first 10 million). Maybe I need to declare myself as a pro league.
    Good thinking. And see how much money you'd get to keep before it gets passed along to the entities which comprise your league, each of which ARE taxed.
    τὸν ἥλιον ἀνατέλλοντα πλείονες ἢ δυόμενον προσκυνοῦσιν

  13. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by All-American View Post
    Good thinking. And see how much money you'd get to keep before it gets passed along to the entities which comprise your league, each of which ARE taxed.
    Maybe corporate tax should be eliminated based on the same logic.
    "If there is one thing I am, it's always right." -Ted Nugent.
    "I honestly believe saying someone is a smart lawyer is damning with faint praise. The smartest people become engineers and scientists." -SU.
    "I never preached in Texas, but I have preached in places as wicked..." -Brigham Young.
    "If we do nothing we'll be substantially behind (other Power leagues) a decade from now." -Bob Bowlsby on Big 12 expansion.
    GIVE 'EM HELL, BRIGHAM!

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Ted View Post
    Maybe corporation tax should be eliminated based on the same logic.
    Now you're talking.
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  15. #75
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    Football’s Risks Sink In, Even in Heart of Texas

    MARSHALL, Tex. — In many ways, this East Texas town stands as a vibrant example of the state’s storied relationship with football.


    Not long ago, caravans of cars drove to Houston and Dallas to watch the Marshall Mavericks battle for the high school state football championship, and signs hanging from bridges along the interstate read, “Playoff bound.” The local sporting-goods shops would sell out of red-and-white merchandise — anything in the school’s colors — on game days.


    But now Marshall represents something quite different — a shift in perceptions about football that would have been hard to imagine when the school made a cameo in the book “Friday Night Lights” nearly 25 years ago.


    Amid widespread and growing concerns about the physical dangers of the sport, the school board here approved plans in February to shut down the district’s entry-level, tackle-football program for seventh graders in favor of flag football. There was little objection.

    “I’m surprised, in some ways, because you know how it is in a one high school town where football is everything,” said Marc Smith, the superintendent of the Marshall Independent School District. “I anticipated a little more resistance and concern. But the safety factor really resonated with our parents. They get it, and they see their little 11- or 12-year-olds getting slammed to the ground.”

    No one here considers the decision the beginning of the end of scholastic football in Texas. The sport remains wildly popular, and recreational tackle leagues are open to 5-year-olds. But because it is happening in Texas, an otherwise small move to end a seventh-grade tackle program reflects how the issue of brain trauma has begun to affect the football landscape.


    In less than a decade, hits to the head have gone from an unavoidable (and underreported) byproduct of a tough sport to an injury that has altered the way the game is played. Recent research has indicated that players as young as 7 sustain hits to the head comparable in magnitude to those absorbed by high school and adult players.
    [...]
    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/12/sp...=64827400&_r=0


    If this is the end of football then what will folks in Texas do with their Friday nights? Maybe football needs to be replaced by ice hockey.
    "If there is one thing I am, it's always right." -Ted Nugent.
    "I honestly believe saying someone is a smart lawyer is damning with faint praise. The smartest people become engineers and scientists." -SU.
    "I never preached in Texas, but I have preached in places as wicked..." -Brigham Young.
    "If we do nothing we'll be substantially behind (other Power leagues) a decade from now." -Bob Bowlsby on Big 12 expansion.
    GIVE 'EM HELL, BRIGHAM!

  16. #76

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    http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/11...-als-diagnosis

    Physicians correct me if I'm wrong but there hasn't been a connection between ALS and concussions.

    Haven't 3 former NFL players who died after being diagnosed with ALS actually had another disease that is very similar but can be caused by concussions?

  17. #77
    Senior Member Katy Lied's Avatar
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    First MLB player diagnosed with CTE: Ryan Freel

    http://www.cnn.com/2013/12/15/health...ide/index.html

  18. #78
    It is NOT a monkey! creekster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katy Lied View Post
    First MLB player diagnosed with CTE: Ryan Freel

    http://www.cnn.com/2013/12/15/health...ide/index.html
    We should start and End of Baseball thread. Or maybe we could call it "Basebul has not been bery, bery good to me"
    PLesa excuse the tpyos.

  19. #79
    Grooveshark dick tease MarkGrace's Avatar
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    Right now, as all of its seasons at all levels are just beginning, American football is under unprecedented assault. Science is providing more and more evidence that the game is physically perilous to everyone who plays it. This forces a series of hard decisions on the participants and moral questions on the devotees. Is it ethical, or even humane, to be entertained for fun and (occasionally) profit by a sport that so inevitably destroys the people who play it? (Steve Almond’s recently released book, Against Football, poses these questions very directly.) There are only two possible approaches to these issues. You can answer them honestly, or you can duck them entirely. And the latter approach often involves cloaking yourself in the almost theological tribalism that American football shares with all the other varieties.

    Think about the defenses of American football that rely on “tradition” as an argument opposing the moral case against the game. Think about how closely American football has attached itself to the U.S. military, from the in-game commercials to the now-customary flyovers of attack aircraft. Think about the 2011 Super Bowl, in which we had “God Bless America” and the National Anthem, a flyover, and a bizarre video that sought to link John F. Kennedy’s inaugural address, Martin Luther King’s speech on the National Mall, and Ali’s KO of Liston in Lewiston, Maine. Think about the way football is positioned as some kind of essentially American journey. Patriotism may be the last refuge of scoundrels, but it’s also a handy hideout for huge corporate athletic enterprises that are facing existential questions about what they do to the athletes who engage in them.

    But that may be enough to help American football to survive. We haven’t yet evolved beyond tribalism as human beings, or beyond jingoism as a nation. For good or ill, countries all over the world use something called “football” as a statement of their national identity. We like to think that we’re different, but we’re not. We’ve attached ourselves and our image of ourselves as a people to what we call football as securely as the folks in Lisbon or Killarney — or, for that matter, Melbourne — have to what they call football. It provides a sense of belonging, even more than do the other sports. Calling something “football” is a way of calling yourself a citizen.
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  20. #80
    Huge Member BigPiney's Avatar
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    I finished reading League of Denial a few weeks ago. It was really interesting and made me question whether I would want my sons to play football if they chose to do so.

    It did reinforce my belief that the NFL is run by a bunch of bad people.

  21. #81

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    http://m.espn.go.com/nfl/story?storyId=11502913

    Possible HOF'er with memory loss at 36, yikes.

  22. #82
    Huge Member BigPiney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fusnik View Post
    http://m.espn.go.com/nfl/story?storyId=11502913

    Possible HOF'er with memory loss at 36, yikes.
    Dude will have CTE. Thought of this thread when I saw that story.

  23. #83

  24. #84

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    Quote Originally Posted by fusnik View Post
    Like BigPiney with the other story, I thought of this thread when I saw this story. The guy was 25 years old.

    I did wonder about the timing of the NFL settlement and how that might have played into the decision to exhume and test a year after the death.
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  25. #85
    Senior Member Katy Lied's Avatar
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    I was willing to believe Brady Hoke's excuse that he didn't see the vicious hit on his QC Shane Morris, and that's why he left him in the game, but after watching the video, it is utterly inexcusable that no one on the sidelines noticed and signalled to pull Morris out, or at least not reinsert him back into the game without being cleared by a doctor. Who doesn't see their own QB being speared by another player? That player should have been tossed from the game.

    The footage makes me sick to my stomach. Why does Michigan keep defending an incompetant coach who doesn't win and who doesn't care about the health of his players?

    If this weren't so serious, it would almost be funny that something like this -- a failure of this magnitude -- could happen the way it did. The quarterback at Michigan, pretty much the guy everyone in the stadium is watching, is wobbling around on a bad ankle, and he's allowed to stay in the game damn near defenseless, and is immediately hit. He stays in. A few plays later he takes a shot to the head.There are 102,926 people in the stadium, and it seems like the only ones who didn't see what happened to Shane Morris were the Michigan coaches and medical personnel.
    After Morris was drilled by Minnesota defensive end Theiren Cockran, helmet to helmet, he tries to walk off the field and starts to collapse like a broken fence. Only the presence of offensive tackle Ben Braden stops Morris from sagging to the ground. The crowd saw it. People watching on TV saw it. The commentators on ESPN saw it, and to his credit, ESPN's Ed Cunningham had been saying for several plays that Morris should be pulled. The first time was after a Minnesota player had rolled up Morris' leg, leaving him grimacing and limping. Second time? After Morris is hit while throwing an incomplete pass, helpless in the pocket, and Cunningham reiterates that Michigan should be removing this wounded player from the game.
    Then the hit by Cockran. As he walks off the field Morris' knees buckle and he falls into Braden, his head coming to rest on Braden's arm.
    Hoke says he never saw the hit to the head. Same goes for everyone else on his staff -- on the sideline and in the press box, including some with access to replays -- and everyone on the medical staff as well. So when all of these trained professionals saw Shane Morris reeling his way off the field, and when they saw teammates gesturing to the sideline for help, they all thought it was because of the ankle.
    The same ankle that was hurt several plays earlier. The same ankle Morris was trying to play on. So the explanation of the Michigan coaches and staff is that they knew about the ankle, and knew their quarterback was compromised, but they didn't feel it was important enough to remove him from the game. So he stayed in and was hit twice. Once in the head.
    Which nobody at Michigan seemed to have seen.
    That's their story, ands they're sticking to it
    The hit occurs at 2:21. It's off camera but they replay it.

    Last edited by Katy Lied; 09-30-2014 at 07:38 AM.

  26. #86
    Huge Member BigPiney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katy Lied View Post
    I was willing to believe Brady Hoke's excuse that he didn't see the vicious hit on his QC Shane Morris, and that's why he left him in the game, but after watching the video, it is utterly inexcusable that no one on the sidelines noticed and signalled to pull Morris out, or at least not reinsert him back into the game without being cleared by a doctor. Who doesn't see their own QB being speared by another player? That player should have been tossed from the game.

    The footage makes me sick to my stomach. Why does Michigan keep defending an incompetant coach who doesn't win and who doesn't care about the health of his players?



    The hit occurs at 2:21. It's off camera but they replay it.

    Yeah, that was pretty bad. We all know Hoke is going to be fired, why not do it this week and save some face?

  27. #87
    Kicked to the curb San Juan Sun's Avatar
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    I wish I still lived in Michigan, just to say "I told you so" to all the UM fans I knew that liked the Hoke hire.
    "Sure, I fought. I had to fight all my life just to survive. They were all against me. Tried every dirty trick to cut me down, but I beat the bastards and left them in the ditch."

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  28. #88
    Huge Member BigPiney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by San Juan Sun View Post
    I wish I still lived in Michigan, just to say "I told you so" to all the UM fans I knew that liked the Hoke hire.
    You can say it to Woot. http://www.cougarstadium.com/showthr...l=1#post589443

  29. #89
    Kicked to the curb San Juan Sun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigPiney View Post
    Woot is my dawg. I would never rub his nose in the mess Hoke has made.
    "Sure, I fought. I had to fight all my life just to survive. They were all against me. Tried every dirty trick to cut me down, but I beat the bastards and left them in the ditch."

    - Ty Cobb

  30. #90
    Huge Member BigPiney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by San Juan Sun View Post
    Woot is my dawg. I would never rub his nose in the mess Hoke has made.
    Well, that is no fun.

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