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Thread: What Are You Reading Now?

  1. #2401
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigPiney View Post
    https://www.npr.org/2018/10/16/65798...-by-anna-burns

    Milkman - by Anna Burns won the Man Booker Prize.

    Here was the shortlist:
    Daisy Johnson, U.K., Everything Under

    Esi Edugyan, Canada, Washington Black

    Rachel Kushner, U.S., The Mars Room

    Richard Powers, U.S., The Overstory

    Robin Robertson, U.K., The Long Take

    I am glad that US authors now are eligible.
    Thanks for posting. Haven’t read any of these yet. Guess I’ll start with the winner.

  2. #2402

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    Just finished A Gentleman in Moscow, based on some recommendations here. It was a decent book, but I didn't love it.
    This was one of the best books I've read in years. Readers who deem it slow don't appreciate it as a concept: it's a character study and a freaking hilarious one at that.

    There are plans to turn it into a movie or mini-series. I simply can't imagine how the genius of that book translates in any way, shape, or form to celluloid.

  3. #2403
    Huge Member BigPiney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Babs View Post
    This was one of the best books I've read in years. Readers who deem it slow don't appreciate it as a concept: it's a character study and a freaking hilarious one at that.

    There are plans to turn it into a movie or mini-series. I simply can't imagine how the genius of that book translates in any way, shape, or form to celluloid.
    Agreed, loved it.

    I must be on a Russia kick since I visited a few years ago, but I just read A Terrible Country https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/10/b...e-country.html

    I liked it, but the ending was hurried. Gives a look into Moscow in our day. Not near on the same level as A Gentleman in Moscow.

  4. #2404
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Babs View Post
    This was one of the best books I've read in years. Readers who deem it slow don't appreciate it as a concept: it's a character study and a freaking hilarious one at that.
    It was excellent. It's been a year and a half since I read it and I actually still miss the Count. Have you read his Rules of Civility? While nowhere near as complete a novel as Gentleman, it is still worth reading. Towles has a facility with dialogue that I really enjoy, and it was quite evident in that first novel.

  5. #2405

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    Quote Originally Posted by SteelBlue View Post
    It was excellent. It's been a year and a half since I read it and I actually still miss the Count. Have you read his Rules of Civility? While nowhere near as complete a novel as Gentleman, it is still worth reading. Towles has a facility with dialogue that I really enjoy, and it was quite evident in that first novel.
    Yes. Rules of Civility was okay, but nothing like the Gentleman. Like you, I was disappointed to realize I had turned the final page. I didn't want it to end. The movie/series will be a disaster.

    I recently finished reading the works of Fredrik Backman. A Man Called Ove is the best known novel but imo not his best one.

  6. #2406
    Huge Member BigPiney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Babs View Post
    Yes. Rules of Civility was okay, but nothing like the Gentleman. Like you, I was disappointed to realize I had turned the final page. I didn't want it to end. The movie/series will be a disaster.

    I recently finished reading the works of Fredrik Backman. A Man Called Ove is the best known novel but imo not his best one.
    Which of his did you like best? I started reading the hockey one and got bored too quick. I think I read 20% and haven't been back in months.

  7. #2407

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigPiney View Post
    Which of his did you like best? I started reading the hockey one and got bored too quick. I think I read 20% and haven't been back in months.
    A Man Called Ove is cute but nothing special. The only one I was most impressed by is And Every Day the Way Home Gets Longer. It's absolutely brilliant but a serious heartbreaker. I only recommend it if you're into the whole tear-jerking catharsis kind of thing.

  8. #2408

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    Quote Originally Posted by Babs View Post
    A Man Called Ove is cute but nothing special. The only one I was most impressed by is And Every Day the Way Home Gets Longer. It's absolutely brilliant but a serious heartbreaker. I only recommend it if you're into the whole tear-jerking catharsis kind of thing.
    he’s into a different kind of jerking catharsis
    Te Occidere Possunt Sed Te Edere Non Possunt Nefas Est.

  9. #2409

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    Stay classy, Gregg.

  10. #2410
    The dude abides Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    Educated by Tara Westover.

    Rural Idaho mormon version of Hillbilly Elegy.
    Quote Originally Posted by bluegoose View Post
    What did you think? I've got it on my kindle. I read Hillbilly Elegy a few months ago and thought it was just ok.
    OK, I just finished it so time to do a short review. This is an engrossing book, especially so for LDS readers as the family in question is from rural Idaho and are hardcore LDS fundamentalists. Tara goes to BYU where she starts to learn about the world after an extremely sheltered childhood.

    In the end, I didn't like this book that much. I love a good memoir, but this one is just too raw for my tastes. It is basically the nasty underbelly of an incredibly messed up, dysfunctional and abusive family. Not much of a resolution in the end.
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
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  11. #2411

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    Devil in the White City. Good, engaging history. Recommended on here a few years ago, but finally getting around to it.



    It's a Scott Freaking Brick narration, but this one isn't too bad because: A: I'm listening at 1.4 speed and B: he doesn't actually have to do an character voices.

  12. #2412
    My Mic Sounds Nice falafel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LiveCoug View Post
    Devil in the White City. Good, engaging history. Recommended on here a few years ago, but finally getting around to it.



    It's a Scott Freaking Brick narration, but this one isn't too bad because: A: I'm listening at 1.4 speed and B: he doesn't actually have to do an character voices.
    F'n Scott Brick. Of course they pick him to narrate a good book like that.

    Speaking of bad narrators, I've discovered another horrible one: Nick Sullivan. He narrated the first Mitch Rapp book, Transfer of Power. I love Mitch Rapp (thanks YOhio!), but he nearly ruined the book for me. Luckily I was able to read most of the book instead of listen to it, so I was able to substitute George Guidall's voice for Sullivan's in my head.
    Ain't it like most people, I'm no different. We love to talk on things we don't know about.

    "The only one of us who is so significant that Jeff owes us something simply because he decided to grace us with his presence is falafel." -- All-American

    GIVE 'EM HELL, BRIGHAM!

  13. #2413
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
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    Any Murakami fans here? I feel like maybe old gregg and Katylied have mentioned liking him in the past? So, I have a love/indifference relationship with him. The first of his that I read was The Wind Up Bird Chronicle, his best in my opinion and by a fairly wide margin. After finishing that I wanted to read everything he has written, and I pretty much have. Unfortunately, as I've made my way through his works I have frequently felt let down. Nothing has lived up to that Wind Up Bird, though I have certainly liked others, Norwegian Wood for example was quite good. His most recent offerings have been forgettable.

    Anyway, I'm about 1/4 of the way through his newest, Killing Commendatore and it feels like a return to that Wind Up Bird form. Yes, he uses the same techniques as he does in all of his novels. If you played Murakami bingo you could check off lonely male narrator, unnamed narrator, unfaithful spouse, whiskey and whisky, jazz, opera, classical music, history of American and British rock, awkwardly described sex scenes, and though it hasn't happened yet, I'm certain there'll be a cat. The difference this time, so far, is that the story feels more complete, the magical realism has been haunting and captivating instead of inducing eye rolling. When I've really liked Murakami, he's brought to mind David Mitchell (whose works I read first) and I'm feeling that so far. So, plenty of pages left to go downhill, but so far I'm all in. It's like Wind Up at a mid-life crossroads, and since I'm there age wise, this one has been worthwhile so far.
    Last edited by SteelBlue; 10-19-2018 at 12:51 PM.

  14. #2414
    The dude abides Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteelBlue View Post
    Any Murakami fans here? I feel like maybe old gregg and Katylied have mentioned liking him in the past? So, I have a love/indifference relationship with him. The first of his that I read was The Wind Up Bird Chronicle, his best in my opinion and by a fairly wide margin. After finishing that I wanted to read everything he has written, and I pretty much have. Unfortunately, as I've made my way through his works I have frequently felt let down. Nothing has lived up to that Wind Up Bird, though I have certainly liked others, Norwegian Wood for example was quite good. His most recent offerings have been forgettable.

    Anyway, I'm about 1/4 of the way through his newest, Killing Commendatore and it feels like a return to that Wind Up Bird form. Yes, he uses the same techniques as he does in all of his novels. If you played Murakami bingo you could check off lonely male narrator, unnamed narrator, unfaithful spouse, whiskey and whisky, jazz, opera, classical music, history of American and British rock, awkwardly described sex scenes, and though it hasn't happened yet, I'm certain there'll be a cat. The difference this time, so far, is that the story feels more complete, the magical realism has been haunting and captivating instead of inducing eye rolling. When I've really liked Murakami, he's brought to mind David Mitchell (whose works I read first) and I'm feeling that so far. So, plenty of pages left to go downhill, but so far I'm all in. It's like Wind Up at a mid-life crossroads, and since I'm there age wise, this one has been worthwhile so far.
    I read Norwegian Wood when it came out in the original Japanese.
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
    "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.
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  15. #2415
    Board Bookworm happyone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    I read Norwegian Wood when it came out in the original Japanese.
    Now, I'm impressed

    I've have read any Murakami, but it sounds like he should go on the TBR list

    I may be small, but I'm slow.

    A veteran - whether active duty, retired, or national guard or reserve is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to, "The United States of America ", for an amount of "up to and including my life - it's an honor."

  16. #2416

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    I read Norwegian Wood when it came out in the original Japanese.
    My new judge just recommended a Brazilian novel. I asked about the translation, but there is no translation. I guess he just assumed everyone is literate in Portuguese.

  17. #2417

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    Quote Originally Posted by SteelBlue View Post
    Any Murakami fans here? I feel like maybe old gregg and Katylied have mentioned liking him in the past? So, I have a love/indifference relationship with him. The first of his that I read was The Wind Up Bird Chronicle, his best in my opinion and by a fairly wide margin. After finishing that I wanted to read everything he has written, and I pretty much have. Unfortunately, as I've made my way through his works I have frequently felt let down. Nothing has lived up to that Wind Up Bird, though I have certainly liked others, Norwegian Wood for example was quite good. His most recent offerings have been forgettable.

    Anyway, I'm about 1/4 of the way through his newest, Killing Commendatore and it feels like a return to that Wind Up Bird form. Yes, he uses the same techniques as he does in all of his novels. If you played Murakami bingo you could check off lonely male narrator, unnamed narrator, unfaithful spouse, whiskey and whisky, jazz, opera, classical music, history of American and British rock, awkwardly described sex scenes, and though it hasn't happened yet, I'm certain there'll be a cat. The difference this time, so far, is that the story feels more complete, the magical realism has been haunting and captivating instead of inducing eye rolling. When I've really liked Murakami, he's brought to mind David Mitchell (whose works I read first) and I'm feeling that so far. So, plenty of pages left to go downhill, but so far I'm all in. It's like Wind Up at a mid-life crossroads, and since I'm there age wise, this one has been worthwhile so far.
    A little too trippy for my taste (I've read A wild sheep chase, and tried to finish 1q84).

  18. #2418
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    I read Norwegian Wood when it came out in the original Japanese.
    That is seriously badass. I wish I could.

    Quote Originally Posted by Applejack View Post
    A little too trippy for my taste (I've read A wild sheep chase, and tried to finish 1q84).
    Try Wind Up Bird. I hated IQ84. Wild Sheep Chase was early, I thought it was meh as well.

  19. #2419
    Board Bookworm happyone's Avatar
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    I just started A World Ablaze
    A newish look a Martin Luther and the beginnings of the Reformation. If it means anything, it's by BYU history professor, Craig Harline and is published by Oxford University Press.

    A couple I've finished recently but haven't gotten around to typing up my complete thoughts - and I don't if I will.

    The King's Assassin

    A interesting, but not particularly well written look at King James I/VI favorite and almost certainly lover, George Villiers.
    It's an interesting look a court politics and how James raised Villliers from the minor nobility to the Duke of Buckingham.
    There are some interesting stories including the tale of the Future Charles I trip to Spain to hurry up the negotiations for a proposed wedding between himself and the Spanish Infanta. George accompanied Charles. They traveled incognito and neglected to let either the French (they travelled through France to get to Spain) or the Spanish know they were coming. In the end it didn't work and the engagement never happened.

    The title comes from the speculation at the time of James' death that George had something to do with it. When James fell ill for the final time, George dismissed James' Doctors and had his personal doctor come up with some "Physic". When James died, his enemies blamed him.

    This is only a 3 star read for me on GoodReads inspite of some interesting stories

    The Butchering Art

    This is a look at Jonathon Lister and his work with antiseptics. There are some pretty gory descriptions of Victorian operating theaters and dissection rooms. The narrative also follows the change in surgery from a trade to a profession.

    There are some pretty startling statics about surgical survival rates in London hospitals before Lister's work became accepted. Some of the hospitals had post operative death rates of greater than a 90% death rate, one almost 100%. At the roughly the same time as Lister's work, anesthesia became widely used. In fact, Lister attended the first use of anesthesia in a British operation.

    In telling Lister's story the author looks at how those twin advancements changed Surgery. Before Surgeons mainly cut off limbs and set broken bones - they would not touch the Chest or Abdomen if at all possible. The author make a point that those two advancements made modern thoracic surgery possible.

    Very readable and a solid 4 stars for me on GoodReads
    Last edited by happyone; 10-26-2018 at 07:13 PM.

    I may be small, but I'm slow.

    A veteran - whether active duty, retired, or national guard or reserve is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to, "The United States of America ", for an amount of "up to and including my life - it's an honor."

  20. #2420
    Semper infra dignitatem PaloAltoCougar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyone View Post
    I just started A World Ablaze
    A newish look a Martin Luther and the beginnings of the Reformation. If it means anything, it's by BYU history professor, Craig Harline and is published by Oxford University Press...
    I may read this, if only because (a) his book about his mission, Way Below the Angels, was entertaining, and (b) his son is still open.

  21. #2421
    Board Bookworm happyone's Avatar
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    so far it's been breezy (not academic at all) and a bit irreverent. He refers to Luther as Brother Martin or Friar Martin

    I may be small, but I'm slow.

    A veteran - whether active duty, retired, or national guard or reserve is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to, "The United States of America ", for an amount of "up to and including my life - it's an honor."

  22. #2422
    BYU Delenda Est Mormon Red Death's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Babs View Post
    My new judge just recommended a Brazilian novel. I asked about the translation, but there is no translation. I guess he just assumed everyone is literate in Portuguese.
    Lemme guess... "o mei pei de laranja lima"

    Am i right?
    "Be a philosopher. A man can compromise to gain a point. It has become apparent that a man can, within limits, follow his inclinations within the arms of the Church if he does so discreetly." - The Walking Drum

    "And here’s what life comes down to—not how many years you live, but how many of those years are filled with bullshit that doesn’t amount to anything to satisfy the requirements of some dickhead you’ll never get the pleasure of punching in the face." – Adam Carolla

  23. #2423
    Senior Member BigFatMeanie's Avatar
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    Read Michael Connelly's "Two Kinds of Truth" in one sitting on the plane. It's the most recent Bosch book until next week when a new one comes out. It was good but I didn't feel like it had the character depth and broodiness that you typically get out of a Bosch book. It was almost like a quick-hitting action thriller. Now I'm reading "The Poet", also by Connelly. It's almost too much depth/broodiness, taking a really long time to develop any type of plot so far.

  24. #2424
    Local Character clackamascoug's Avatar
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    My wife dated Craig Harline back in the day. His brother Brad was the ZL that emergency transferred me out of Springfield MO upon interviewing a young lady that we had scheduled for baptism.

    Good times.

    Downloaded "Where the Crawdads Sing." women seem to love the book. No reviews by a man that I could see.
    Last edited by clackamascoug; 11-04-2018 at 09:38 AM.

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  25. #2425
    вот так штука CardiacCoug's Avatar
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    This weekend I read the Scott Adams (of Dilbert fame) book Win Bigly.

    I gotta say it’s kind of an essential book for understanding the Trump phenomenon.

    Today when I see Trump saying “Barack <pause> H. <pause> Obama” I’m understanding that in a different way.

    As much of a buffoon as he is in so many ways I’m now convinced that Trump has an intuitive understanding of white blue collar psychology that is definitely an evil “genius” skill.

  26. #2426
    The dude abides Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
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    Just finished Bad Blood about Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos. Seems like a few of you here recommended it. Really fascinating story.
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
    "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.
    "Juilliardk N I ibuprofen Hyu I U unhurt u" - creekster

  27. #2427
    вот так штука CardiacCoug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    Just finished Bad Blood about Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos. Seems like a few of you here recommended it. Really fascinating story.
    Yep fascinating. A modern-day, real life version of The Emporer’s New Clothes right down to the detail that it took “children” (new college grads) to point out to all the middle-aged and older people that this was all a scam.

  28. #2428
    UofU/BYU mixed marriage Scott R Nelson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CardiacCoug View Post
    This weekend I read the Scott Adams (of Dilbert fame) book Win Bigly.

    I gotta say it’s kind of an essential book for understanding the Trump phenomenon.
    I just ordered it from my local library.

  29. #2429

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    Just finished Bad Blood about Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos. Seems like a few of you here recommended it. Really fascinating story.
    I'm halfway through on audiobook. Great story.

  30. #2430
    The dude abides Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CardiacCoug View Post
    Yep fascinating. A modern-day, real life version of The Emporer’s New Clothes right down to the detail that it took “children” (new college grads) to point out to all the middle-aged and older people that this was all a scam.
    Yeah, that was nuts. Really felt sorry for those kids, especially the Schultz grandson.
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
    "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.
    "Juilliardk N I ibuprofen Hyu I U unhurt u" - creekster

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