Page 69 of 70 FirstFirst ... 195967686970 LastLast
Results 2,041 to 2,070 of 2094

Thread: What Are You Reading Now?

  1. #2041
    Huge Member BigPiney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    4,799

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SteelBlue View Post

    Somewhere in the mountains, Piney is cursing.
    LOL, Just shaking my head.

    BTW, I am almost done with Reservoir 13, which was longlisted for the Booker. I really liked it and think you would like it.

  2. #2042
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    FarNorCal
    Posts
    6,222

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BigPiney View Post
    LOL, Just shaking my head.

    BTW, I am almost done with Reservoir 13, which was longlisted for the Booker. I really liked it and think you would like it.
    You are the only one from whom I will accept criticism of this book. As you know, I loved it but hey, agree to disagree. I will definitely check out Reservoir 13. My library is slow to get the good new stuff and I haven’t been reviewing nearly as much lately.

  3. #2043
    Semper infra dignitatem PaloAltoCougar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Pleasanton, CA
    Posts
    11,294

    Default

    Thanks (and I mean that) to SB, BP and JL, I finally picked up a copy of The Nix and have been immensely entertained. I have about 100 pages to go and I'm already sad it's nearing a very uncertain conclusion. The main story is interesting and very well-written, but it's the many side characters and stories that enrich the experience. Before turning off the light last night, I read what seemed like a multipage sentence about pwnage's effort to finally give up Elfcraft (a WoW-like computer game) and it was deeply touching. Between pwnage, Periwinkle, Laura, Bishop, Charlie Brown, and a few others, not to mention the primary narrative, I'm having a great time. Thanks for the rec.

    I also just finished The Taking of K-129, the story of how the U.S. conspired with Howard Hughes (or at least his minions) in an attempt to recover a Soviet nuclear sub more than three miles beneath the ocean's surface in the early '70s, which was probably the most elaborate and expensive spy caper in history. Throughout the 80s, I always wondered what that monstrous boat, the Glomar Explorer, was doing moored amongst many dozens of mothballed freighters in the bay near San Francisco. Now I know. The book has more technical detail than I cared about, but how they came up with the technology to scavenge the distant ocean floor was still interesting.

  4. #2044
    Board Bookworm happyone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    North Davis County
    Posts
    4,125

    Default

    I finished Ben MacIntyer's book on Kim Philby

    A Spy Among Friends: Kim Philby and the Great Betrayal
    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...-among-friends

    excellent look at the Soviet Spy ring that was operating in the British Gov't in the 40's and 50's. Philby rose to be head of MI6's counter intelligence and at one point was MI6's representative to the CIA. Really good look at just how he was able to infiltrate MI6 and stay one jump ahead of the CI guys in MI5. He also looks at his friend Nick Elliot - who was not KGB and rose to the highest levels in MI6 and defended Philby to the last. James Angleton of the CIA, who MacIntyer says just about destroyed the CIA looking for moles in the aftermath of Philby's exposure, also figures prominently.

    I am currently reading Dan Jones new Medieval History

    The Templars: The Rise and Spectacular Fall of God's Holy Warriors
    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...6-the-templars

    A fairly complete look at them, not only their battle history in the Holy Land, but their operations else where including Spain and how they became the prototype international bankers.

    I haven't typed up my complete thoughts on either one just yet
    Last edited by happyone; 10-19-2017 at 05:49 PM.

    I may be small, but I'm slow.

    A veteran - whether active duty, retired, or national guard or reserve is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to, "The United States of America ", for an amount of "up to and including my life - it's an honor."

  5. #2045
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    FarNorCal
    Posts
    6,222

    Default

    Read Madame Bovary for the first time and enjoyed it immensely. A great story of a transformation and downward spiral that strangely reminded me of Breaking Bad more than once. I found it especially interesting that Flaubert and his publisher were prosecuted at the time of the book's publication for insulting public morals and religion when it wouldn't cause even the most prude of modern readers to blush.
    Last edited by SteelBlue; 10-20-2017 at 01:01 PM.

  6. #2046
    вот так штука CardiacCoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    The SLC
    Posts
    9,823

    Default

    I finally got around to reading The Gene by Siddhartha Mukherjee — what a great book. I loved his book about cancer and this is even better. I feel like I know a lot of the stories but the way he puts the history into such a compelling and connected narrative is awesome.

    I’ve started Age of Anger and liking it too so far — then Homo Deus and maybe The Nix (to insert a little fiction) will be on my list.

  7. #2047
    Local Character clackamascoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Frog Pond Grange
    Posts
    5,848

    Default

    Just finished today - (36 hours) of Snowball: Warren Buffet and the Business of Life.

    It was very listenable - and captivating at times. Lots of early information about how Warren became Warren, even to the point where he stole golf balls from Sears as a young teenager to make side money as he fenced his booty. Learned horse handicapping, and bought a farm at 14 with $2000 he had saved leasing it to a man for 50/50 split of the net profit. His story continues along the arc that we all know... until he has so much cash on hand (40+ billion) that he almost runs out of ideas of how to spend it. The book also gives a clear insight into his infamous marriage... and how much he loved his wife even though they didn't live together past 1979. Talks about Bill Gates a lot, but not as much as I thought it would.

    My ideal book is one that I'll listen to twice - I'll sit on this a few months and redoit next year.

    When poet puts pen to paper imagination breathes life, finding hearth and home.
    -Mid Summer's Night Dream


  8. #2048
    Trump-hating snowflake Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    The heart of the UC
    Posts
    44,044

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CardiacCoug View Post
    I finally got around to reading The Gene by Siddhartha Mukherjee — what a great book. I loved his book about cancer and this is even better. I feel like I know a lot of the stories but the way he puts the history into such a compelling and connected narrative is awesome.

    I’ve started Age of Anger and liking it too so far — then Homo Deus and maybe The Nix (to insert a little fiction) will be on my list.
    Heh.

    http://www.cougarstadium.com/showthr...=1#post1338196

    I am about 1/3 of the way through The Gene. I agree that it is even better then the cancer book that won the Pulitzer. Really fascinating stuff.

    I had no idea that the eugenics stuff went as far as it did in the USA. Blows my mind that the SCOTUS voted 8-1 to approve forced sterilization of poor people.
    "Socialism is not bad IMHO" - byu71
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
    "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.

  9. #2049
    Trump-hating snowflake Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    The heart of the UC
    Posts
    44,044

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PaloAltoCougar View Post
    Thanks (and I mean that) to SB, BP and JL, I finally picked up a copy of The Nix and have been immensely entertained. I have about 100 pages to go and I'm already sad it's nearing a very uncertain conclusion. The main story is interesting and very well-written, but it's the many side characters and stories that enrich the experience. Before turning off the light last night, I read what seemed like a multipage sentence about pwnage's effort to finally give up Elfcraft (a WoW-like computer game) and it was deeply touching. Between pwnage, Periwinkle, Laura, Bishop, Charlie Brown, and a few others, not to mention the primary narrative, I'm having a great time. Thanks for the rec.
    Hard to overstate how much I loved this novel. You are right, it is character driven. Funny you should mention that about pwnage. I had the same reaction: repulsed at first, but eventually became sympathetic. Ditto for Laura Pottsdam. Ditto for Sam's mother ("How could you abandon your son?!"). Ultimately, I think this is one of the central themes of the book. I enjoyed this passage near the end:

    “Because if you see people as enemies or obstacles or traps, you will be at constant war with them and with yourself. Whereas if you choose to see people as puzzles, and if you see yourself as a puzzle, then you will be constantly delighted. Because eventually, if you dig deep enough into anybody, if you really look under the hood at someone’s life, you will find something familiar. This is more work of course, than believing they are enemies. Understanding is always harder than plain hatred. But it expands your life. You will feel less alone."
    "Socialism is not bad IMHO" - byu71
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
    "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.

  10. #2050
    Semper infra dignitatem PaloAltoCougar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Pleasanton, CA
    Posts
    11,294

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    Hard to overstate how much I loved this novel. You are right, it is character driven. Funny you should mention that about pwnage. I had the same reaction: repulsed at first, but eventually became sympathetic. Ditto for Laura Pottsdam. Ditto for Sam's mother ("How could you abandon your son?!"). Ultimately, I think this is one of the central themes of the book. I enjoyed this passage near the end:
    A strong quote, and helped eliminate what was a growing sense that the ending was going to be disappointingly weak or formulaic. I love the last few paragraphs of the book.

    One other note... My morning commute includes a 1.5 mile-long exit lane for those of us moving from one freeway to another. Typically, the lineup in the lane is more than a mile long, with latecomers or jerks trying to sneak in near the front of the line, while everyone behind seethes at this injustice. I therefore loved this observation:

    There is no place less communal in Americaóno place less cooperative and brotherly, no place with fewer feelings of shared sacrificeóthan a rush-hour freeway in Chicago. And there is no better test of this than watching what happens where there is a hundred-car line in the far-right lane, which there is when Samuel reaches his exit. How people bypass the line and dive into any available cranny in front, skipping all the drivers patiently waiting, all of whom are now enraged at this because they each have to wait incrementally longer, but also a bigger and deeper rage that the asshole didinít wait his turn like everyone else, that he didnít suffer like they suffer, and then also a tertiary inner rage that they are suckers who wait in line.
    To my shame, these are my feelings exactly.

  11. #2051
    Trump-hating snowflake Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    The heart of the UC
    Posts
    44,044

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PaloAltoCougar View Post
    A strong quote, and helped eliminate what was a growing sense that the ending was going to be disappointingly weak or formulaic. I love the last few paragraphs of the book.

    One other note... My morning commute includes a 1.5 mile-long exit lane for those of us moving from one freeway to another. Typically, the lineup in the lane is more than a mile long, with latecomers or jerks trying to sneak in near the front of the line, while everyone behind seethes at this injustice. I therefore loved this observation:



    To my shame, these are my feelings exactly.
    Ha! I remember that quote. I marked it and played it for my wife.

    Ditto for the first exchange between Sam and Laura when he caught her cheating. The audiobook version of that was brilliant and had us both laughing to tears.
    "Socialism is not bad IMHO" - byu71
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
    "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.

  12. #2052
    Semper infra dignitatem PaloAltoCougar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Pleasanton, CA
    Posts
    11,294

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    Ha! I remember that quote. I marked it and played it for my wife.

    Ditto for the first exchange between Sam and Laura when he caught her cheating. The audiobook version of that was brilliant and had us both laughing to tears.
    The Sam/Laura exchange was hilarious, and I wondered if you and others in the needlenecked wankers crowd (no offense!) had had similar experiences. That would make for a wonderful movie scene.

  13. #2053
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    FarNorCal
    Posts
    6,222

    Default

    Finished L.A. Confidential by James Ellroy. Long a favorite film, I've been wanting to read the book that inspired it. One of the more complex crime novels I've come across especially compared with the movie. I have to say that film adaptation is brilliant, reducing eight major plot lines to 3ish. Excellent book and so different from the movie that the reading experience didn't feel redundant at all. The biggest difference, in the book every detective is dirty and the Lt. Exley character has as many flaws and skeletons as anyone else, probably more.

  14. #2054
    Board Bookworm happyone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    North Davis County
    Posts
    4,125

    Default

    I recently finished The Great Quake

    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...he-great-quake

    It the story of the 1964 Alaska Earth Quake. At this time it is the strongest earthquake ever measured in North America 9.2 on the Richter Scale
    Not only is this the story of people who went through the quake and the damage it did, but the author also tells how it affected the acceptance of contenential drift and plate tectonics.

    It's a little dry is spots, but I found rather fascinating. I can actually remember seeing reports of this on the news.
    Last edited by happyone; 10-30-2017 at 02:23 PM.

    I may be small, but I'm slow.

    A veteran - whether active duty, retired, or national guard or reserve is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to, "The United States of America ", for an amount of "up to and including my life - it's an honor."

  15. #2055
    Senior Member Eddie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Davis County
    Posts
    5,698

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    Hard to overstate how much I loved this novel. You are right, it is character driven. Funny you should mention that about pwnage. I had the same reaction: repulsed at first, but eventually became sympathetic. Ditto for Laura Pottsdam. Ditto for Sam's mother ("How could you abandon your son?!"). Ultimately, I think this is one of the central themes of the book. I enjoyed this passage near the end:
    Quote Originally Posted by PaloAltoCougar View Post
    A strong quote, and helped eliminate what was a growing sense that the ending was going to be disappointingly weak or formulaic. I love the last few paragraphs of the book.

    One other note... My morning commute includes a 1.5 mile-long exit lane for those of us moving from one freeway to another. Typically, the lineup in the lane is more than a mile long, with latecomers or jerks trying to sneak in near the front of the line, while everyone behind seethes at this injustice. I therefore loved this observation:

    To my shame, these are my feelings exactly.
    Those quotes remind me quite a bit of the Arbinger Institute stuff.

  16. #2056
    Trump-hating snowflake Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    The heart of the UC
    Posts
    44,044

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie View Post
    Those quotes remind me quite a bit of the Arbinger Institute stuff.
    Really? Ugh...
    "Socialism is not bad IMHO" - byu71
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
    "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.

  17. #2057
    Senior Member Eddie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Davis County
    Posts
    5,698

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    Really? Ugh...
    Yup.

    All the stuff my CEO brings to us from Arbinger is about seeing people as obstacles, tools, or irrelevant versus seeing them as people. Then she gets into seeing others as having "hopes and dreams of their own" and trying to understand them.

    Obviously I'm not doing it much justice in a couple of sentences - But it sure seems like while the approach is a little different - at its core it shares some similarities.

  18. #2058
    Trump-hating snowflake Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    The heart of the UC
    Posts
    44,044

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie View Post
    Yup.

    All the stuff my CEO brings to us from Arbinger is about seeing people as obstacles, tools, or irrelevant versus seeing them as people. Then she gets into seeing others as having "hopes and dreams of their own" and trying to understand them.

    Obviously I'm not doing it much justice in a couple of sentences - But it sure seems like while the approach is a little different - at its core it shares some similarities.
    Yeah, I read one of those books and I didn't like it much. Anatomy of Peace.

    I have the Leadership and Self-Deception book in my queue, but I can't bring myself to read it.
    "Socialism is not bad IMHO" - byu71
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
    "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.

  19. #2059
    My Mic Sounds Nice falafel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Las Wegas!
    Posts
    26,149

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    Ha! I remember that quote. I marked it and played it for my wife.

    Ditto for the first exchange between Sam and Laura when he caught her cheating. The audiobook version of that was brilliant and had us both laughing to tears.
    I just read that exchange this afternoon at lunch. It was classic.
    Ain't it like most people, I'm no different. We love to talk on things we don't know about.

    "The only one of us who is so significant that Jeff owes us something simply because he decided to grace us with his presence is falafel." -- All-American

    GIVE 'EM HELL, BRIGHAM!

  20. #2060
    Senior Member Katy Lied's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Center of the Salt Lake Valley
    Posts
    8,336

    Default

    Mike Brown, How I Killed Pluto and Why It Had It Coming. Way way less boring that you'd think. Pluto's not the first planet killed by scientific consensus. We used to have the planets Ceres and Pallas (with elements cerium and palladium named after them), and Juno and Vesta who were sketchy enough that they couldn't even get the chemists to name an element after them. The author sprinkles fascinating facts throughout-- like since man discovered Pluto, we've only observed a little over one quarter of its orbit (255 years for a complete rotation).

    Mike Brown also does a good job describing the pressure to publish or perish, which in astronomy means discovering new planets, and the intricate balancing act between validating and rechecking your discoveries, but at the same time not taking so long that someone else beats you to the discovery of a new body. He also talks about how all astronomers hate the moon.

  21. #2061

    Default

    I just finished Bruce Dickinson's autobiography What Does This Button Do? For those who don't know Bruce is the lead singer of Iron Maiden. He's also a university graduate, world class fencer, commercial airline captain, author, screenwriter, and in demand corporate speaker.

    It's excellent in every way and I had several instances where I almost spat what I was drinking onto my iPad. I was fun finding out what made the guy tick and he gets extra credit for delivering the goods with British charm.

    It inspired me to start reading Nikki Sixx's The Heroin Diaries. So far it's also an interesting look into the perils of rock star heroin addiction.

  22. #2062

    Default

    Just finished Elantris, Brandon Sanderson's first published novel. I am a big fan of his writing style, having read all of the Mistborn series and The Emperer's Soul. Although he's best classified as a fantasy writer, he includes a lot of theology and political philosophy in his work. Elantris is no different. It's a stand alone book, so if you're wary of starting a series (like I usually am, before I started Mistborn ), this is a good book for fantasy homers.

    It would be interesting to spend some time picking his brain. He spends so much time talking about faith in the abstract, that I wonder what he's struggled with in his own life.

  23. #2063

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Northwestcoug View Post
    Just finished Elantris, Brandon Sanderson's first published novel. I am a big fan of his writing style, having read all of the Mistborn series and The Emperer's Soul. Although he's best classified as a fantasy writer, he includes a lot of theology and political philosophy in his work. Elantris is no different. It's a stand alone book, so if you're wary of starting a series (like I usually am, before I started Mistborn ), this is a good book for fantasy homers.

    It would be interesting to spend some time picking his brain. He spends so much time talking about faith in the abstract, that I wonder what he's struggled with in his own life.
    Just come back to BYU and take his class.

  24. #2064

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pelagius View Post
    Just come back to BYU and take his class.
    I'm no writer, but I think that would be a very interesting class. Not sure if the commute would be worth it though...

  25. #2065

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Northwestcoug View Post
    I'm no writer, but I think that would be a very interesting class. Not sure if the commute would be worth it though...
    Yeah, pretty sure it's extremely difficult to get into; you have to apply for the class itself.

  26. #2066
    UofU/BYU mixed marriage Scott R Nelson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Pleasanton, CA
    Posts
    654

    Default

    The Burning Room by Michael Connelly. This may be his best book yet. I'm almost done and can't put it down. He's great at telling an intersting complex story that doesn't lose the reader in its complexity.

    I needed a book like this after reading an LDS Romance Novel (Borrowed Light) that my wife had finished. That one was a bit too predictable and needed some more research for accuracy. My wife loved it, but I had to push myself to get through it. Apparently we don't like the same sort of books.

  27. #2067

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pelagius View Post
    Yeah, pretty sure it's extremely difficult to get into; you have to apply for the class itself.
    You can watch previous year's sessions on youtube.
    One of the grandest benefits of the enlightenment was the realization that our moral sense must be based on the welfare of living individuals, not on their immortal souls. Honest and passionate folks can strongly disagree regarding spiritual matters, so it's imperative that we not allow such considerations to infringe on the real happiness of real people.

    Woot

    I believe religion has much inherent good and has born many good fruits.
    SU

  28. #2068
    Senior Member Katy Lied's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Center of the Salt Lake Valley
    Posts
    8,336

    Default

    Pierce Brown's Red Rising Trilogy. Painful but awesomely enjoyable.
    Joe Haldeman's Forever War Trilogy Vietnam in Outer Space. Also, the basic plot for the movie Pacific Rim.
    Gregory Berns How Dogs Love Us: A Neuroscientist and his Adopted Dog Decode the Canine Brain. Bet you want to know how he gets a conscious dog to voluntarily lay down in an MRI machine.

    Next up: Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow. Wish me luck.

  29. #2069
    Bald not naked Pelado's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    The 208
    Posts
    8,487

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Katy Lied View Post
    Pierce Brown's Red Rising Trilogy. Painful but awesomely enjoyable.
    Joe Haldeman's Forever War Trilogy Vietnam in Outer Space. Also, the basic plot for the movie Pacific Rim.
    Gregory Berns How Dogs Love Us: A Neuroscientist and his Adopted Dog Decode the Canine Brain. Bet you want to know how he gets a conscious dog to voluntarily lay down in an MRI machine.

    Next up: Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow. Wish me luck.
    Good luck.
    "I think it was King Benjamin who said 'you sorry ass shitbags who have no skills that the market values also have an obligation to have the attitude that if one day you do in fact win the PowerBall Lottery that you will then impart of your substance to those without.'"
    - Goatnapper'96

  30. #2070
    My Mic Sounds Nice falafel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Las Wegas!
    Posts
    26,149

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott R Nelson View Post
    The Burning Room by Michael Connelly. This may be his best book yet. I'm almost done and can't put it down. He's great at telling an intersting complex story that doesn't lose the reader in its complexity.

    I needed a book like this after reading an LDS Romance Novel (Borrowed Light) that my wife had finished. That one was a bit too predictable and needed some more research for accuracy. My wife loved it, but I had to push myself to get through it. Apparently we don't like the same sort of books.
    I love the Bosch novels. I'm reading the new one, Two Kinds of Truth, right now. Only a few chapters in, but its good so far. That Bosch tho, he' such a hardass.

    Also, what in the hell were you doing reading an LDS romance novel?!?! Its not like you're watching tv with your wife and sometimes need to cave on a show she likes.
    Ain't it like most people, I'm no different. We love to talk on things we don't know about.

    "The only one of us who is so significant that Jeff owes us something simply because he decided to grace us with his presence is falafel." -- All-American

    GIVE 'EM HELL, BRIGHAM!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •