Page 95 of 96 FirstFirst ... 458593949596 LastLast
Results 2,821 to 2,850 of 2861

Thread: What Are You Reading Now?

  1. #2821
    Bald not naked Pelado's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    The 208
    Posts
    12,224

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SeattleUte View Post
    Quoting out of context is dishonest and defamatory and hilarious.
    fify
    "I think it was King Benjamin who said 'you sorry ass shitbags who have no skills that the market values also have an obligation to have the attitude that if one day you do in fact win the PowerBall Lottery that you will then impart of your substance to those without.'"
    - Goatnapper'96

  2. #2822
    Huge Member BigPiney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    6,726

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SeattleUte View Post
    The Pulitzer often blows it, actually. The problem is the effort to reward accessible books actually caters to the lowest common denominator. Now you have politics tainting the process.
    I agree. that Less book from last year or the year before was terrible.

  3. #2823

    Default

    "A Darker Shade of Magic". A quick and enjoyable read. Has an interesting magical world. Like a lot of fantasy, it loses steam at the end and feels rushed. But still a decent book. It's part of a trilogy but does fine as a stand-alone book. I'm going to continue with the next ones.
    "...you pointy-headed autopsy nerd. Do you think it's possible for you to post without using words like "hilarious," "absurd," "canard," and "truther"? Your bare assertions do not make it so. Maybe your reasoning is too stunted and your vocabulary is too limited to go without these epithets."
    "You are an intemperate, unscientific poster who makes light of very serious matters.
    - SeattleUte

  4. #2824
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    FarNorCal
    Posts
    6,536

    Default

    Got an e-galley of the new David Mitchell novel, Utopia Avenue. He plays around with structure again, this time the novel is constructed like an LP. I liked it a lot, and felt the final 1/3 was quite a payoff. Mitchell has always respected his readers enough to leave some heavy lifting to them and those unfamiliar with him may find it to be too much work. My prediction is that fans will enjoy it, but it's unlikely to make much noise outside of that. If you're one who has an interest in the 60's British and U.S. rock scene, the book may be of extra interest to you.

  5. #2825
    Faith crisis consultant SeattleUte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    19,638

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SteelBlue View Post
    Got an e-galley of the new David Mitchell novel, Utopia Avenue. He plays around with structure again, this time the novel is constructed like an LP. I liked it a lot, and felt the final 1/3 was quite a payoff. Mitchell has always respected his readers enough to leave some heavy lifting to them and those unfamiliar with him may find it to be too much work. My prediction is that fans will enjoy it, but it's unlikely to make much noise outside of that. If you're one who has an interest in the 60's British and U.S. rock scene, the book may be of extra interest to you.
    Mitchell is one of my favorite working English speaking writers (I tend to prefer non-Anglo American novels).
    When a true genius appears, you can know him by this sign: that all the dunces are in a confederacy against him.

    --Jonathan Swift

  6. #2826
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    FarNorCal
    Posts
    6,536

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SeattleUte View Post
    Mitchell is one of my favorite working English speaking writers (I tend to prefer non-Anglo American novels).
    Same. I credit you for introducing me to him many years ago. So, thank you.

  7. #2827
    Corporate lackey for Jesus Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    The heart of the UC
    Posts
    51,369

    Default

    Just finished Know My Name by the victim in the stanford rape case. Not bad, but could have used some editing. The last 4 hrs were repetitive.
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
    "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.
    "Juilliardk N I ibuprofen Hyu I U unhurt u" - creekster

  8. #2828
    Huge Member BigPiney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    6,726

    Default

    I just finished the third in the way too long Hilary Mantel Thomas Cromwell-series. The Mirror and the Light. Easily the best one in my opinion.

    My prediction is that it will win the Booker Prize, not that that means anything.

  9. #2829
    Bald not naked Pelado's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    The 208
    Posts
    12,224

    Default

    Just finished reading the second of the Michael Vey series - Rise of the Elgen - to my 10-year-old. She liked it. Both of my older children read the series and liked it, but, unlike the older two, the youngest is not as interested in reading to herself.

    I don't think I would have noticed this if I'd been reading to myself instead of out loud, but there were a few parts where I got a little choked up. So embarrassing. I'm growing soft in my old age.
    "I think it was King Benjamin who said 'you sorry ass shitbags who have no skills that the market values also have an obligation to have the attitude that if one day you do in fact win the PowerBall Lottery that you will then impart of your substance to those without.'"
    - Goatnapper'96

  10. #2830
    Board Bookworm happyone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    North Davis County
    Posts
    4,977

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BigPiney View Post
    I just finished the third in the way too long Hilary Mantel Thomas Cromwell-series. The Mirror and the Light. Easily the best one in my opinion.

    My prediction is that it will win the Booker Prize, not that that means anything.
    I really got to get to this one.

    I may be small, but I'm slow.

    A veteran - whether active duty, retired, or national guard or reserve is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to, "The United States of America ", for an amount of "up to and including my life - it's an honor."

  11. #2831
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    FarNorCal
    Posts
    6,536

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by happyone View Post
    I really got to get to this one.
    I love it when happyone crosses into the fiction zone.

  12. #2832
    Faith crisis consultant SeattleUte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    19,638

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SteelBlue View Post
    I love it when happyone crosses into the fiction zone.
    Historical fiction fans need to read The Leopard. One of the greatest.
    When a true genius appears, you can know him by this sign: that all the dunces are in a confederacy against him.

    --Jonathan Swift

  13. #2833
    Board Bookworm happyone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    North Davis County
    Posts
    4,977

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SeattleUte View Post
    Historical fiction fans need to read The Leopard. One of the greatest.
    Who is the author - is it you?

    goodreads only lists one book by that title and its Italian
    Last edited by happyone; 05-23-2020 at 10:20 AM.

    I may be small, but I'm slow.

    A veteran - whether active duty, retired, or national guard or reserve is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to, "The United States of America ", for an amount of "up to and including my life - it's an honor."

  14. #2834
    Board Bookworm happyone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    North Davis County
    Posts
    4,977

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SteelBlue View Post
    I love it when happyone crosses into the fiction zone.
    I read a couple of historical mysteries just a few books ago - nice diversion
    If you are interested they were books 4 and 5 of David Wishart's Marcus Corvinius series. This series is set in Tiberius' Roman Empire (Lydian Baker is set in Greece)

    The Lydian Baker
    Old Bones


    I also just finished one by one my favorite HF authors Robert Harris. It isn't HF though. It is about the election of a new Pope, set in the near future

    Conclave

    I found the first half-2/3rds fascinating, the last part was a little off putting for me- the main candidates are somehow involved in every major scandal currently embroiling the church, sexual or financial. The winner has a special twist. I only rated it 3 stars on Good Reads

    I'm also anxiously awaiting new books by Bernard Cornwell, Sharon Kay Penman, Ben Kane and Conn Iggluden
    Last edited by happyone; 05-23-2020 at 10:16 AM.

    I may be small, but I'm slow.

    A veteran - whether active duty, retired, or national guard or reserve is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to, "The United States of America ", for an amount of "up to and including my life - it's an honor."

  15. #2835
    Faith crisis consultant SeattleUte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    19,638

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by happyone View Post
    Who is the author - is it you?

    goodreads only lists one book by that title and its Italian
    Yes, the Italian novel. There is a very good translation.

    Here is an article about the translation.

    Essay: Lampedusa's 'The Leopard,' fifty years on
    https://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/29/a...e=articleShare

    I generally prefer novels that have been translated.
    Last edited by SeattleUte; 05-23-2020 at 11:20 AM.
    When a true genius appears, you can know him by this sign: that all the dunces are in a confederacy against him.

    --Jonathan Swift

  16. #2836
    Bald not naked Pelado's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    The 208
    Posts
    12,224

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SeattleUte View Post
    Yes, the Italian novel. There is a very good translation.

    Here is an article about the translation.

    Essay: Lampedusa's 'The Leopard,' fifty years on
    https://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/29/a...e=articleShare

    I generally prefer novels that have been translated.
    I generally prefer to read novels in their original language. Since I don't know many other languages, I'm postponing reading foreign-language novels until after I learn the languages. I'm also postponing reading novels in languages I do know, out of solidarity for the other languages.
    "I think it was King Benjamin who said 'you sorry ass shitbags who have no skills that the market values also have an obligation to have the attitude that if one day you do in fact win the PowerBall Lottery that you will then impart of your substance to those without.'"
    - Goatnapper'96

  17. #2837
    Faith crisis consultant SeattleUte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    19,638

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pelado View Post
    I generally prefer to read novels in their original language. Since I don't know many other languages, I'm postponing reading foreign-language novels until after I learn the languages. I'm also postponing reading novels in languages I do know, out of solidarity for the other languages.
    This is a ridiculous restriction. People go on and on about accuracy of the translation of a great literary work and they don’t know what they’re talking about. For example, the Iliad, the great Russian novels, or the Pentateuch. What I care about is the translation that uses a vernacular that is most beautiful to my ear. Any translation is shot through with subjective interpretation. Good translators write with tremendous skill and artistry in their own right. We now place their names beside the novelist’s on the book cover. I bet that some translated modern novels are better written in English than in the original tongue. What matters is the writing quality, ultimately.

    When I say I prefer translated novels, I mean that non-Anglo-Saxon novelists write material that to me is more interesting and moving. It’s entirely subjective, but the Nobel committee seems to agree with me. The English are better than American novelists, who are the worst, except maybe for Canadians. So you’re cheating yourself out of a lot.
    When a true genius appears, you can know him by this sign: that all the dunces are in a confederacy against him.

    --Jonathan Swift

  18. #2838
    Huge Member BigPiney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    6,726

    Default


  19. #2839
    Corporate lackey for Jesus Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    The heart of the UC
    Posts
    51,369

    Default

    Damn, I am really starting to worry about SU.
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
    "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.
    "Juilliardk N I ibuprofen Hyu I U unhurt u" - creekster

  20. #2840

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SeattleUte View Post
    This is a ridiculous restriction. People go on and on about accuracy of the translation of a great literary work and they don’t know what they’re talking about. For example, the Iliad, the great Russian novels, or the Pentateuch. What I care about is the translation that uses a vernacular that is most beautiful to my ear. Any translation is shot through with subjective interpretation. Good translators write with tremendous skill and artistry in their own right. We now place their names beside the novelist’s on the book cover. I bet that some translated modern novels are better written in English than in the original tongue. What matters is the writing quality, ultimately.

    When I say I prefer translated novels, I mean that non-Anglo-Saxon novelists write material that to me is more interesting and moving. It’s entirely subjective, but the Nobel committee seems to agree with me. The English are better than American novelists, who are the worst, except maybe for Canadians. So you’re cheating yourself out of a lot.
    Te Occidere Possunt Sed Te Edere Non Possunt Nefas Est.

  21. #2841
    Faith crisis consultant SeattleUte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    19,638

    Default

    Jokes on all of you. Apparently you don't get dry humor. I fully understood that my initial statement I prefer translated novels would elicit such a response. I payed out the gag. You're all slow. Slow as a sacrament meeting.
    When a true genius appears, you can know him by this sign: that all the dunces are in a confederacy against him.

    --Jonathan Swift

  22. #2842
    Princeps Inter Pares
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    12,122

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SeattleUte View Post
    Jokes on all of you. Apparently you don't get dry humor. I fully understood that my initial statement I prefer translated novels would elicit such a response. I payed out the gag. You're all slow. Slow as a sacrament meeting.
    I was just kidding!

    Gosh I miss third grade.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    τὸν ἥλιον ἀνατέλλοντα πλείονες ἢ δυόμενον προσκυνοῦσιν

  23. #2843

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pelado View Post
    I generally prefer to read novels in their original language. Since I don't know many other languages, I'm postponing reading foreign-language novels until after I learn the languages. I'm also postponing reading novels in languages I do know, out of solidarity for the other languages.
    That's awesome. Can I use this for my excuse too?

  24. #2844
    Bald not naked Pelado's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    The 208
    Posts
    12,224

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bo Diddley View Post
    That's awesome. Can I use this for my excuse too?
    Absolutely, but there will be a royalty associated with its use.
    "I think it was King Benjamin who said 'you sorry ass shitbags who have no skills that the market values also have an obligation to have the attitude that if one day you do in fact win the PowerBall Lottery that you will then impart of your substance to those without.'"
    - Goatnapper'96

  25. #2845

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SeattleUte View Post
    Jokes on all of you. Apparently you don't get dry humor. I fully understood that my initial statement I prefer translated novels would elicit such a response. I payed out the gag. You're all slow. Slow as a sacrament meeting.
    I bet this bit would kill at a comedy club.
    "...you pointy-headed autopsy nerd. Do you think it's possible for you to post without using words like "hilarious," "absurd," "canard," and "truther"? Your bare assertions do not make it so. Maybe your reasoning is too stunted and your vocabulary is too limited to go without these epithets."
    "You are an intemperate, unscientific poster who makes light of very serious matters.
    - SeattleUte

  26. #2846
    Corporate lackey for Jesus Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    The heart of the UC
    Posts
    51,369

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SeattleUte View Post
    Jokes on all of you. Apparently you don't get dry humor. I fully understood that my initial statement I prefer translated novels would elicit such a response. I payed out the gag. You're all slow. Slow as a sacrament meeting.
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
    "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.
    "Juilliardk N I ibuprofen Hyu I U unhurt u" - creekster

  27. #2847
    Local Character clackamascoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Frog Pond Grange
    Posts
    7,612

    Default

    I'm reading The Money Hackers. Thought it might come in handy.

    When poet puts pen to paper imagination breathes life, finding hearth and home.
    -Mid Summer's Night Dream


  28. #2848
    Huge Member BigPiney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    6,726

    Default

    I finished The Maltese Falcon last night.

    Not too bad. Interesting to read the beginning of crime fiction in the US. Now I need to find the movie.

  29. #2849
    Faith crisis consultant SeattleUte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    19,638

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BigPiney View Post
    I finished The Maltese Falcon last night.

    Not too bad. Interesting to read the beginning of crime fiction in the US. Now I need to find the movie.
    The movie is one of those rare films that may be better than the novel.
    When a true genius appears, you can know him by this sign: that all the dunces are in a confederacy against him.

    --Jonathan Swift

  30. #2850
    Philosopher of Men Sleeping in EQ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Outside the Matrix
    Posts
    4,008

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BigPiney View Post
    I finished The Maltese Falcon last night.

    Not too bad. Interesting to read the beginning of crime fiction in the US. Now I need to find the movie.
    The movie is a legitimate classic. MF's externals were shot in the Tenderloin district of San Francisco, a district that now features open-air drug markets, human excreta, semi-organized homelessness, stray needles, and trash.
    We all trust our own unorthodoxies.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •