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Thread: What Are You Reading Now?

  1. #2281
    The dude abides Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pelagius View Post
    I just read the Churchill book. One of my daughters has been pestering (demanding?) me to read either one of these for a while now. I just wasn't that interested. So my expectations weren't sky high and I started it out of a sense of duty but I really liked it. Candice Millard is a very good writer, and I thought the book was genuinely insightful about Churchill while avoiding both hagiography and being overly critical.
    I read it last year. Enjoyed it.
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    Board Bookworm happyone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    I read it last year. Enjoyed it.
    I also read it last year and thought it was pretty good (4+ stars on GR) I've really enjoyed all three of her books.

    I may be small, but I'm slow.

    A veteran - whether active duty, retired, or national guard or reserve is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to, "The United States of America ", for an amount of "up to and including my life - it's an honor."

  3. #2283
    The dude abides Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
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    Just finished the DaVinci bio by Walter Isaacson. A bit too heavy on the hagiography for my tastes, but still a very good book. I listened on Audible, but thankfully they provide a PDF with copies of all the figures and reference them throughout the book. I just had to switch between apps and study the images.

    The timing was good on this. I was finishing it coincident with a trip to Europe. They had a special DaVinci exhibit at the Uffizi in Florence and it was fun to see some works that I had just read about. We also visited the Louvre and made sure to hit all the DaVinci paintings. Overall, we were able to catch more than half of the surviving DaVinci paintings. I was able to pontificate to my travel companions and fooled them into thinking I am some kind of art history expert. Ha.
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
    "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.
    "Juilliardk N I ibuprofen Hyu I U unhurt u" - creekster

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    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigPiney View Post
    Read the winner and the finalists.

    Less: I could have done with a lot less. This was not that good. Just a book about a gay guy that runs from his problems, has a boring trip around the world. Lame. THere was a good line in the book about how you should never win the Pulitzer because it ruins things for the future. He was right, this should never have won the Pulitzer.

    I also read just before this.

    Dunbar: this is a modern telling of King Lear. This was ok. This is part of the Hogarth Shakespeare series. http://hogarthshakespeare.com/ Next up is Jo Nesbo's Macbeth. Nesbo is awesome, so I can't wait.

    I read Less a couple weeks ago and I mostly concur with you, though I did find his humor to be entertaining. I'm guessing there was nobody more surprised that he'd won than Greer himself.

    I've read a couple of the Hogarth series and have yet to be too impressed.

  5. #2285

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    I read in the Deseret News this morning that George Q. Cannon's journals are online. I've been reading them--interesting so far.

  6. #2286
    Board Bookworm happyone's Avatar
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    I finished volume 2 of James Hollands history of WWII

    The War in the West - Volume 2

    Interesting take on the middle years of WW II in Europe (1941-43) The author looks at the War in the Desert, the Battle for the Atlantic, the air war and the importence of the Deseret Air Force for the British in North Africa, life on the Home Front and the mobilization of the various economies for war. There is some British slang that threw me for a moment and one glaring statement GI stands for General Infantry - I'd never heart that one before. In spite of the title, quite a lot on the war in Russia. He does opine a lot on Hitler's strategic mistakes (going into Russia in the first place and not mobilizing for total war in 1939 among others - solid 4 star read

    Currently reading an advance copy of P. T. Deutermann's new WWII novel The Iceman
    In this one Capt Deutermann returns to the Submarine war and the subs based out of Dawin Australia. I'm about half way thru and throroughly enjoying it.
    Last edited by happyone; 07-25-2018 at 07:09 PM.

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    A veteran - whether active duty, retired, or national guard or reserve is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to, "The United States of America ", for an amount of "up to and including my life - it's an honor."

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    UofU/BYU mixed marriage Scott R Nelson's Avatar
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    "Darwin" Australia. My father was based there during WWII. Your description makes me want to read the book. Thanks.

  8. #2288

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    "The Cadaver King and The Country Dentist", by Radley Balko and Tucker Carrington. It's been a few years since I've read non-fiction for fun, but I'm glad I came across it. It's an expose of shoddy/fraudulent forensics work and prosecutorial misconduct in Mississippi, from the 1990's on. It centers on two men wrongfully convicted of murdering children, but it expands to other cases connected to the same pathologist and DA's in Mississippi. I found myself continually shaking my head, hoping that DA offices are not as bad in other areas of the country. I have a feeling that it's a more generalized problem.

    If you can access the book online, read the first two chapters. You'll know soon if you want to continue.

  9. #2289
    The dude abides Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
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    Just finished Beneath a Scarlet Sky. Novel based on a true story of a young Italian man during the last 2 years of WWII. The main character almost took the story to his grave, which would have been a shame. Absolutely incredible story. Highly recommended. Movie rights have been secured so it will come to the big screen at some point.
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
    "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.
    "Juilliardk N I ibuprofen Hyu I U unhurt u" - creekster

  10. #2290
    Local Character clackamascoug's Avatar
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    I listen to books to help me stay awake while I drive, and recently I had to struggle to stay awake while listening to the last 10 hours of Titan (the story of John D. Rockefeller.) After that burden I decided to go more light and selected "Something in the Water" by first time author Catherine Steadman. The reviews looked good, and I looked forward to a move along story... what I got was a move along story where 2+2=5 or 6... and a lot of the story didn't add up. I pegged the ending half way through and the two main story lines for 90% of the book disappeared as if they were clever decoys so the book could make a big splash at the end. I hate buying a book and feeling duped when its finished.

    Right now I'm halfway through American Kingpin - The Story of Ross Ulbricht and his drug selling website Silk Road. Pretty interesting so far.

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  11. #2291
    Board Bookworm happyone's Avatar
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    I finished Deutermann's The Iceman
    My thoughts if anyone is interested.

    I also recently finished The Darkest Hour

    It is also excellent - A slightly revisionist look at Churchill's first four weeks as Prime Minister in 1940 - through Dunkirk. Excellent look at the politics and how once Chamberlain fell, Churchill was inevitable.
    The author contradicts accepted history as to Churchill's willingness to accept a negotiated peace in the first couple of weeks of his premiership.
    I understand the movie was based on this book. I haven't typed up my thoughts yet, but well worth the time it took to read.
    Last edited by happyone; 07-13-2018 at 02:14 PM.

    I may be small, but I'm slow.

    A veteran - whether active duty, retired, or national guard or reserve is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to, "The United States of America ", for an amount of "up to and including my life - it's an honor."

  12. #2292
    UofU/BYU mixed marriage Scott R Nelson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott R Nelson View Post
    I just finished The Crossing by Michael Connelly. It's a 2015 Harry Bosch murder mystery, but includes a bit of Mickey Haller who is my favorite Connelly character.

    I was going to note this while I was still reading it, but finished it too fast. It was truly a book I couldn't put down. Unlike Lee Child (Jack Reacher novels), Connelly doesn't put words in there just to fill up the space. Everything is important to the story, but relatively easy to follow and the kind of writing that I enjoy the most. The next book I read will be something deeper, but sometimes I just have to read the ones that are a joy to read.
    Just finished The Wrong Side of Goodbye, the next book by Michael Connelly. A 2016 Harry Bosch murder mystery with more Mickey Haller.

    I really enjoyed this one too. Good story with enough complexity to keep it interesting, but unlike somebody like Tom Clancy, you don't have to keep track of a bunch of story lines in hopes of weaving them all together later. It is clear from the beginning how all of the story lines fit together. There were enough twists and turns to keep it interesting without feeling like the author is jerking the reader around.

    I only have a couple of more Michael Connelly novels on my list that I haven't read, then I will have read them all. I might have to go back and reread a few, like maybe the Mickey Haller series.

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    Semper infra dignitatem PaloAltoCougar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaloAltoCougar View Post
    I'm in the middle of four books at the moment (I don't like doing more than two at a time but my ADHD is going into hyperdrive), but I want to add another. Has Tara Westover's Educated been mentioned here? A NYT bestseller, it's the autobiographical story of a young woman (early 30s now) who was raised in SE Idaho by a survivalist, fundamentalist (or simply looney) LDS dad. She doesn't even have a birth certificate, and hadn't seen the inside of a classroom until she was 17. And yet she graduated magna from BYU, went on to study at Harvard, and now has her doctorate from Cambridge. Here's the NYT review; it's definitely up next on my reading list. I suspect others have commented on it here (or at least have read it), but I couldn't find any references to it...
    So starting last week I put the other books down and focused on Educated, which I finished this morning. Read the NYT review highlighted above if you want details, but the book is fascinating, especially after she's able to get into BYU, including a classroom scene when she raises her hand and says she doesn't understand the word "Holocaust." The family is one of the weirdest, most dysfunctional, and in some ways remarkable groups I've ever read about. She and the three siblings who left the family all have PhD's; the three who didn't don't even have high school diplomas. But after struggling trying to make money off of their junkyard, odd jobs, and midwifery, her parents have finally struck it rich with essential oils (not DoTerra, but their own company, Butterfly Expressions).

    It's a quick and pretty amazing read.
    Last edited by PaloAltoCougar; 07-15-2018 at 09:24 AM.

  14. #2294
    The dude abides Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaloAltoCougar View Post
    So starting last week I put the other books down and focused on Educated, which I finished this morning. Read the NYT review highlighted above if you want details, but the book is fascinating, especially after she's able to get into BYU, including a classroom scene when she raises her hand and says she doesn't understand the word "Holocaust." The family is one of the weirdest, most dysfunctional, and in some ways remarkable groups I've ever read about. She and the three siblings who left the family all have PhD's; the three who didn't don't even have high school diplomas. But after struggling trying to make money off of their junkyard, odd jobs, and midwifery, her parents have finally struck it rich with essential oils (not DoTerra, but their own company, Butterfly Expressions).

    It's a quick and pretty amazing read.
    Dude. Spoilers!

    This is next in my queue.
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
    "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.
    "Juilliardk N I ibuprofen Hyu I U unhurt u" - creekster

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    Semper infra dignitatem PaloAltoCougar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    Dude. Spoilers!

    This is next in my queue.
    Sorry, but there are plenty more! I note that her home (and the HQ of the company) is very close to Preston. I'm hope for a tie-in and sequel to Napoleon Dynamite.

  16. #2296
    Huge Member BigPiney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pelagius View Post
    Ok, this is a fun read:

    This is such a crazy book. Great and interesting read.

  17. #2297
    Local Character clackamascoug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigPiney View Post
    This is such a crazy book. Great and interesting read.
    Isn't it.... The hubris it took for her... outstanding example.

    When poet puts pen to paper imagination breathes life, finding hearth and home.
    -Mid Summer's Night Dream


  18. #2298
    Board Bookworm happyone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyone View Post
    I finished Deutermann's The Iceman
    My thoughts if anyone is interested.

    I also recently finishedThe Darkest Hour

    It is also excellent - A slightly revisionist look at Churchill's first four weeks as Prime Minister in 1940 - through Dunkirk. Excellent look at the politics and how once Chamberlain fell, Churchill was inevitable.
    The author contradicts accepted history as to Churchill's willingness to accept a negotiated peace in the first couple of weeks of his premiership.
    I understand the movie was based on this book. I haven't typed up my thoughts yet, but well worth the time it took to read.
    I finally typed up my thoughts on the The Darkest Hour if any one is interested

    I also recently finished a couple of others that I haven't gotten around to typing up my thoughts - The first an interesting look at the Revolutionary War General "Mad" Anthony Wayne and his involvement in reestablishing the US Army and his victory at Fallen Timbers in 1794 that finally force the British to give up there forts in the area and secured the Ohio/Northwest Territory for the US

    The Unlikely General

    Lots of very good information - starting with St. Claire's defeat at the Wabash in 1791 that almost totally destroyed his command and with it most of the US Army (800 of the 900 troops he had were killed by a confederation of the Shawnee/Delaware/Miami tribes - a worse defeat than the Little Bighorn some 80 or so yrs later). The main problem I had with this book is it's organization - the author skips all over the timeline in telling Wayne's story. In one paragraph he is on the Ohio in '93 as he training his men, the next paragraph he is in Canada in 1775 getting the troops of the failed invasion back to the colonies. She will then drop to post Yorktown South Carolina as he is trying to get the British out of the Charleston. The discussion of topic is also disjointed. She discusses his political career, his womanizing, drinking, obviously his military career, both in the Revolution and afterwords. The organization caused me to drop what was other wise a 4+ star book to 3 stars on GR.


    The other book is Patrick O'Donnell's look at the men who escorted the body of the Unknown Soldier back from France in 1921

    The Unknowns

    Mr. O'Donnell tells the story of the 8 men including the man who chose the Unknown and their experiences in WWI. All 8 were still in the military at the time of the selection and transporting the body of the Unknown, all were NCOs, 5 where in the Army, 2 the Navy and 1 was Marine. 2 had been awarded the Medal of Honor, 1 had been POW, 4 had served in the 2nd Division. In addition to the stories of the "Body Bearers" as they were known, he also tells the story of the American War in general including the stories of Sgt York and the Lost Battalion whose commander, Charles Whittlesey, was awarded the MOH for his actions and leadership. He later committed suicide shortly after the Unknown Soldier was entombed. He was at the ceremony and was heard to say "I shouldn't have come."

    I will type up my more complete thoughts as I have the time. Solid 4 out of 5 star read - Recommended
    Last edited by happyone; 07-25-2018 at 10:27 PM.

    I may be small, but I'm slow.

    A veteran - whether active duty, retired, or national guard or reserve is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to, "The United States of America ", for an amount of "up to and including my life - it's an honor."

  19. #2299
    The dude abides Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
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    I just finished The Obesity Code, by Jason Fung. My doctor son talked me into reading it. This is a potentially life-changing book. I was already aware of much of the stuff he presented, but I still learned a ton. The great thing is that he constantly cites clinical trials and does so in an engaging and interesting fashion. He just keeps hammering away with evidence to support his main claims. Great book.

    A summary:

    1) His main thesis is that obesity has many factors, but far and away the most important factor is insulin resistance. He presents a mountain of evidence to support this. Insulin resistance results from eating sugars and refined carbs and from snacking too much, i.e., overloading your blood with insulin then never giving it a break. Insulin resistance raises your body's set point (fat thermostat) and keeps you fat.

    2) Calorie counting does not work as it is based on a fundamentally flawed assumption - that your body burns calories at a steady rate. Also, it does not address the fundamental problem: insulin resistance.

    3) Exercise has very little impact on weight loss. You should do it to be healthy, but it plays a very minor role in weight loss.

    4) Eat less/move more does not work in the long run, again because it does not address insulin resistance. Study after study shows that it doesn't work.

    5) The anti-fat crusade was a disaster. Fats do not make you fat. They do not produce an insulin response and they trigger satiety hormones. Most people who eat low fat replace the fats with carbs, a recipe for failure.

    6) Proteins stimulate insulin and should be eaten in moderation. This is why atkins diet does not work long-term.

    7) Natural fats (olive oil, avocados, nuts) are extremely healthy and promote weight loss.

    8) The current fad to eat 6 small meals per day (i.e., grazing) is wrong. That keeps your insulin high and promotes resistance.

    9) Avoid high fructose corn syrup like the plague. It can only be metabolized in the liver and causes fatty liver and insulin resistance, moreso than cane sugar.

    10) Not all carbs are bad. Whole fruits are just fine because the fiber, etc. reduces the insulin response.

    11) To reduce insulin resistance, he recommends:

    a) Avoid sugars and refined carbs (white flour especially)
    b) Eat a mediterranean diet
    c) Never ever snack between meals - this gives your body an insulin break
    d) Intermittent fasting. Fast 2x per week (with plenty of fluids). This again gives your body an insulin break and reduces insulin resistance.

    There is far more to it, but you get the idea. I have been doing this for about a month and have lost quite a bit of weight already.
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
    "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.
    "Juilliardk N I ibuprofen Hyu I U unhurt u" - creekster

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    Semper infra dignitatem PaloAltoCougar's Avatar
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    Thanks for that, Dude. What does he recommend for the duration of a fast?

  21. #2301
    The dude abides Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaloAltoCougar View Post
    Thanks for that, Dude. What does he recommend for the duration of a fast?
    Either a 16/8 or 5/2. The 16/8 approach means you eat all your meals during an 8-hr period each day. 11am - 7pm for example. That gives your body a 16-hr insulin break. The 5/2 approach is a 24-hr fast (typically skip breakfast and lunch) for 2 days per week. Or some combination of the two. This is food only - drink water, teas, etc to stay hydrated. Some electrolytes help. Once you hit target weight, you can scale back to one day per week.

    I do the 5/2 route. I fast on Sundays and then I pick a weekday (usually wednesday or thursday). Your body really does adjust to it. The first several times were rough, but it is quite easy now. He makes a pretty compelling argument that our bodies are wired for intermittent fasting.
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
    "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.
    "Juilliardk N I ibuprofen Hyu I U unhurt u" - creekster

  22. #2302
    One man.....one pie Moliere's Avatar
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    What does he say about diet drinks, specifically Coke Zero? Asking for a friend.

    On a tangent, I find it incredibly difficult to fast longer than one meal. I sometimes wonder if this is due to my eating habits, which are good but not great or to my fairly consistent exercise (usually 45 mins per day at least with hr most in zone 3 or 4 with longer periods of 2+ hours on Saturday). Probably a combination of both.

    I can definitely attest to exercise having minus impact on weight loss. I did lose some weight initially, about ten pounds, but have been around 160 pounds for the past 7 years. I’m fine with that weight, but it’s only dropped to around 150 once when I got done with my marathon training. Interestingly enough, when you are running 30-40 miles per week you are practically forced to eat healthy just to recover.
    "Discipleship is not a spectator sport. We cannot expect to experience the blessing of faith by standing inactive on the sidelines any more than we can experience the benefits of health by sitting on a sofa watching sporting events on television and giving advice to the athletes. And yet for some, “spectator discipleship” is a preferred if not primary way of worshipping." -Pres. Uchtdorf

  23. #2303
    Semper infra dignitatem PaloAltoCougar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    Either a 16/8 or 5/2. The 16/8 approach means you eat all your meals during an 8-hr period each day. 11am - 7pm for example. That gives your body a 16-hr insulin break. The 5/2 approach is a 24-hr fast (typically skip breakfast and lunch) for 2 days per week. Or some combination of the two. This is food only - drink water, teas, etc to stay hydrated. Some electrolytes help. Once you hit target weight, you can scale back to one day per week.

    I do the 5/2 route. I fast on Sundays and then I pick a weekday (usually wednesday or thursday). Your body really does adjust to it. The first several times were rough, but it is quite easy now. He makes a pretty compelling argument that our bodies are wired for intermittent fasting.
    That makes sense, and seems consistent from an evolutionary perspective (some hunting/gathering days weren't as successful as others). My biggest dietary sins are nighttime bowls of ice cream and too many chocolate chip cookies. I know both habits are bad but I am weak. I'm going to work on this, though.

  24. #2304

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    Interesting stuff. I have a friend who is losing 10-15 pounds per month using the fasting protocols alone. He doesn't worry at all about what he eats. He does the 16/8 everyday, but fasts once per week skipping 2 meals.

  25. #2305
    It is NOT a monkey! creekster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    Either a 16/8 or 5/2. The 16/8 approach means you eat all your meals during an 8-hr period each day. 11am - 7pm for example. That gives your body a 16-hr insulin break. The 5/2 approach is a 24-hr fast (typically skip breakfast and lunch) for 2 days per week. Or some combination of the two. This is food only - drink water, teas, etc to stay hydrated. Some electrolytes help. Once you hit target weight, you can scale back to one day per week.

    I do the 5/2 route. I fast on Sundays and then I pick a weekday (usually wednesday or thursday). Your body really does adjust to it. The first several times were rough, but it is quite easy now. He makes a pretty compelling argument that our bodies are wired for intermittent fasting.
    It makes sense (to me) that we are wired for intermittent fasting. The rest of it is pretty intuitively sensible too, it seems. But what is the mechanism of insulin resistance, at a chemical level, that causes weight gain? Is it the same thing that the Atkins people talked about (because the Atkins approach was pretty much the same as what you are talking about excpet, obviously, for the protein consumption).

    Also, can you elaborate on the idea that bodies doesn't burn calories at a steady rate?
    PLesa excuse the tpyos.

  26. #2306
    The dude abides Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by creekster View Post
    It makes sense (to me) that we are wired for intermittent fasting. The rest of it is pretty intuitively sensible too, it seems. But what is the mechanism of insulin resistance, at a chemical level, that causes weight gain? Is it the same thing that the Atkins people talked about (because the Atkins approach was pretty much the same as what you are talking about excpet, obviously, for the protein consumption).


    The actual mechanics of that were a little deep, so I am not sure I could explain it well. High insulin causes the body set point in the hypothalamus. Too much insulin makes your cells resistant to insulin so your body produces more, leading to a vicious cycle. Here is a summary by the author:

    https://idmprogram.com/insulin-cause...al-obesity-iv/

    Quote Originally Posted by creekster View Post
    Also, can you elaborate on the idea that bodies doesn't burn calories at a steady rate?
    Sure. There are lots of ways that your body processes calories, and they are highly variable on a day-to-day basis. Your body naturally cranks the burn rate up or down depending on the type of calories and other factors. Your body will process 500 calories of sugar far differently than 500 calories of veggies.

    He shared many studies on this topic. In one case a doctor did an experiment. He decided to eat 5700 calories per day for 3 weeks. Using the traditional calorie formula, he calculated that he would gain 16 lbs. He ate a Mediterranean diet with 10% carbs, 40% protein, and 50% fat. At the end of 3 weeks he had gained 2 lbs and lost 1 inch on his waistline. Then he switched to a traditional american diet with sugar, refined carbs, etc. for 3 weeks. He gained exactly 16 lbs.

    In another case, they took two groups of people: a thin group and a fat group. They gave the skinny group a high calorie diet and they gave the fat group a very low calorie diet until both groups converged at the same weight. Then they checked the metabolism of both groups. The originally fat group had an extremely low metabolism and the originally skinny group had a very high metabolism. In both cases, their bodies were burning calories at drastically different rates trying to get back to the original set weight, which he argues is a function of insulin resistance.

    He argues that almost all diets work in the short term but fail in the long-term because they don't address insulin. You can lose weight but then your metabolism adjusts, hunger hormones kick in, and your body regains the weight. The set-point rules.

    This is somewhat tangential, but interesting. My son shared with me a medical journal article where they did a diet trial with three groups of people:

    Group #1: traditional calorie restricted diet.

    Group #2: intermittent fasting (5/2) but with a med diet and 2800 calorie limit on non-fasting days

    Group #3: intermittent fasting (5/2) with a med diet and unlimited fats and proteins on non-fasting days. Estimated average caloric intake = 5000 calories

    In the end, all three groups lost weight, but groups 2&3 had better results (blood pressure, cholesterol, etc.) and were able to maintain better than group 1. Also, there was no discernible difference between groups 2 & 3.
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  27. #2307

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bo Diddley View Post
    Interesting stuff. I have a friend who is losing 10-15 pounds per month using the fasting protocols alone. He doesn't worry at all about what he eats. He does the 16/8 everyday, but fasts once per week skipping 2 meals.
    seems like even if there’s not some extraordinary physiological benefit of eating high protein/fat and fasting, you’re still fencing your ability to eat crap which is going to drive results.
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  28. #2308
    Royal Rooter Green Monstah's Avatar
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    The Talent Code, by Daniel Coyle

    I'm only a couple of chapters in, but his premise is that talent is the result of "deep practice." Deep practice causes myelin to form around essential neuro pathways and acts as an insulator, thus improving the quality of the signals travelling through our neuro pathways.

    It's interesting, but in the end, Coyle's a journalist, not a neurologist.
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  29. #2309
    The dude abides Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moliere View Post
    What does he say about diet drinks, specifically Coke Zero? Asking for a friend.
    He is very much against artificial sweeteners. That is partly because some of them (stevia, agave nectar for example) stimulate the same insulin response as sugar. Mostly because he is against processed/refined foods and chemicals in general. That is the chapter I didn't like because I love diet sodas! It didn't seem quite as data-driven as the other chapters and aspartame does not appear to drive insulin, so I am going to cut back but probably won't give them up completely.

    Quote Originally Posted by Moliere View Post
    On a tangent, I find it incredibly difficult to fast longer than one meal. I sometimes wonder if this is due to my eating habits, which are good but not great or to my fairly consistent exercise (usually 45 mins per day at least with hr most in zone 3 or 4 with longer periods of 2+ hours on Saturday). Probably a combination of both.

    I can definitely attest to exercise having minus impact on weight loss. I did lose some weight initially, about ten pounds, but have been around 160 pounds for the past 7 years. I’m fine with that weight, but it’s only dropped to around 150 once when I got done with my marathon training. Interestingly enough, when you are running 30-40 miles per week you are practically forced to eat healthy just to recover.
    Exactly. That is my experience too.
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
    "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.
    "Juilliardk N I ibuprofen Hyu I U unhurt u" - creekster

  30. #2310

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    Interesting. This sounds an awful lot like what Vinnie Tortorich (nutritionist to the stars) has been preaching for the last 5 years on Adam Carolla's podcast. I've been meaning to get his book (No Sugar No Grain--NSNG) and now I think I will and i'll add this one too. He also says the liver doesn't distinguish between real sugar and artificial sweeteners, so they create the same insulin spike.
    Prepare to put mustard on those words, for you will soon be consuming them, along with this slice of humble pie that comes direct from the oven of shame set at gas mark “egg on your face”! -- Moss

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