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  1. #31
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
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    August Trinity Alps trip report Day 3

    Our friend had to leave early the 3rd morning, so bluegoose and I were on our own and decided to check out the Boulder Creek Lakes. These were about a 4 mile hike from our base camp iirc, and again mostly steep. This trip takes you out of the Canyon Creek Canyon and into the Boulder Creek Canyon. We went with day packs again, and headed up fairly early. Even though it was early, it was already getting hot. Even at 5-6,000 feet temps were approaching 90 by mid day.

    If you ever run, ride or hike with bluegoose, you're going to go fast. He led out at a good clip and soon I was on my own, left to die at the hand of one of the thousands of Bigfoots that populate the Trinity Alps. It's a very squatchy place for sure.

    Not only did we make it to the Boulder Creek Lakes, we managed to miss them initially and we went much higher. In fact, we made it to the Forbidden Falls which are the outlet of one Forbidden Lake, a lake tucked into a cirque much higher up the mountain. We toyed with going all the way up there but thought better of it and headed back down to our original destination. As far as sights go, this canyon also did not disappoint. One benefit of overshooting the place was this birdseye view of the three lakes.

    The Boulder Creek Lakes



    Once again, it was granite as far as the eye could see. These are photos of the biggest of the 3 lakes. We swam in this one for a while and it was much warmer than the Canyon Creek lakes as it was much shallower.





    The 3 lakes sat ensconsed in a granite cirque with a huge front wall that dropped several hundred feet. It was really something to stand there and look out. This next pic is the only one I have that shows a part of that drop off (to the far left of the lakes).




    The views from the edge of those cliffs:

    Sawtooth Mountain and the Canyon Creek Canyon (it runs left to right in this pic)


    Overall, it was an incredible trip. I can't wait to get back up there again.
    Last edited by SteelBlue; 02-26-2013 at 07:32 AM.

  2. #32
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
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    Return to Canyon Creek Trail- October
    I have 2 brothers in LA and one in Sacramento and after hearing me rave about the Canyon Creek trail, they asked me to take them there in the Fall. I somehow got permission from my wife to take another 3 days and the four of us headed up on a Friday afternoon.

    It was the 3rd week of October, but the weather was very nice. Warm days (shorts weather) with cold nights (just below freezing). We arrived at the trailhead with about 10 minutes of light left and we hiked to the exact same base camp where I'd stayed in August which is 6 miles in. Once the sun sets it gets cold in a hurry, and it was great hiking weather for the 2 ½ hour hike. We went under headlamps the entire 6 miles, so my brothers had a very exciting hike out seeing the first 2/3 of the trail for the first time really.

    We repeated the visits to lower, middle and upper falls and Lower and Upper Lakes. This time around though we chose to visit “L” Lake, a small lake nestled in a cirque high above the Canyon Creek Lakes. This hike was quite steep, but the views were fantastic. Here are some shots from about ¼ of the way up giving us a birds eye view of the Canyon Creek Lakes, and allowing a long view down the canyon which is really quite straight.

    Upper Canyon Creek Lake


    Upper and Lower Canyon Creek Lakes



    While there, I took what ended up being one of my favorite pictures ever as my brother was resting and soaking in the view.

    A Moment of Reflection


    After much suffering and pathfinding (there isn't a trail per se, it's a granite scramble) we arrived at L Lake. I hadn't taken into account that the Fall colors would add to the experience, but they certainly did.

    The cirque in which this lake sat was quite stunning. Incredibly white granite with a blue October sky as background and fall colors in most of the foilage. Here are some shots from different areas of the cirque:











    And then there was the lake itself. Small and clear as glass, with hardly a ripple on the water but for the occasional rising trout.







    We returned to base camp that afternoon and my brothers chose to spend the final day sleeping in and hiking out leisurely to see what they'd missed on the night hike in. I didn't take many pics on the way out, but did get this one that gives you an idea of all the unnamed peaks with cool crags that you see in this place.



    It was another incredible trip with scenes I won't soon forget.

  3. #33
    I ♥ gateway sex FN Phat's Avatar
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    When are you doing the CUF guided 3-day hike? Absolutely stunning.
    I'm your huckleberry.


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  4. #34
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FN Phat View Post
    When are you doing the CUF guided 3-day hike? Absolutely stunning.
    That would be a blast! FN, you have a standing invite with no expiration date.

  5. #35
    The dude abides Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FN Phat View Post
    When are you doing the CUF guided 3-day hike? Absolutely stunning.
    Yeah, no kidding. Looks like a blast.

    Any trout in those lakes?
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
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  6. #36
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    Yeah, no kidding. Looks like a blast.

    Any trout in those lakes?
    Yes, though we didn't fish. The reports I've read say that L Lake is a sure thing. The Canyon Creek Lakes require more skill.

  7. #37
    The dude abides Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteelBlue View Post
    Yes, though we didn't fish. The reports I've read say that L Lake is a sure thing. The Canyon Creek Lakes require more skill.
    Oh I have skill. Mad skills.
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
    "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.
    "Juilliardk N I ibuprofen Hyu I U unhurt u" - creekster

  8. #38

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    Most of my pictures were framed similarly to Steelblue's pics. Only a couple to add.

    Another look at Upper Canyon Creek Falls through the trees. There were some excellent campsites around these trees, although being this close to the falls I would be afraid that I would have to go to the bathroom all night.


    Here is the view of Canyon Creek from our campsite. You can see the base of the falls through the trees. Incredibly tranquil spot.

  9. #39

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    Tangle Blue Lake - Trinity Alps Wilderness, Aug 2009

    A few years ago I was feeling the bug to go for a backpacking trip, as it had been several years since I had done so. My youngest was almost 4 years old at the time, and the older two were 6 and 9 years old. So I found a trail that many people called "kid friendly" and went for it, leaving the youngest home with my wife and setting out with the older two and the dog.

    Tangle Blue Lake hike is about a 3 mile hike in with something like 1,500 feet elevation gain. The first mile is on an old forest service road, and the remaining 2 miles are through a beautiful, lush forest, with several mountain meadows interspersed along the way.

    Here is the first marshy meadow that we came to:


    There were several groves of old growth Incense Cedar trees that we passed through.



    Here are my hiking buddies for the weekend. What in the world happened to my daughter's backpack, you might be asking? Oh, that's right,I'm carrying it, on top of the 55 pound pack of my own. But don't let the older one fool you - I ended up carrying his pack as well for the last 3/4 mile. At least the dog carried his weight the whole way.


    Here is the view from our lake-side campground. As you can see, the lake is set in this alpine cirque with a towering granite cliff as the south backdrop. Beautiful spot, but due to its relatively easy access, it was somewhat busy with several other groups scattered around the lake. Not close enough to be bothersome, but still visible when looking around the area.


  10. #40
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluegoose View Post
    Most of my pictures were framed similarly to Steelblue's pics. Only a couple to add.

    Another look at Upper Canyon Creek Falls through the trees. There were some excellent campsites around these trees, although being this close to the falls I would be afraid that I would have to go to the bathroom all night.


    Here is the view of Canyon Creek from our campsite. You can see the base of the falls through the trees. Incredibly tranquil spot.
    That campsite pic reminds me of you being stalked by a large Sasquatch while you were reading on that rock.

  11. #41
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluegoose View Post
    Tangle Blue Lake - Trinity Alps Wilderness, Aug 2009

    A few years ago I was feeling the bug to go for a backpacking trip, as it had been several years since I had done so. My youngest was almost 4 years old at the time, and the older two were 6 and 9 years old. So I found a trail that many people called "kid friendly" and went for it, leaving the youngest home with my wife and setting out with the older two and the dog.

    Tangle Blue Lake hike is about a 3 mile hike in with something like 1,500 feet elevation gain. The first mile is on an old forest service road, and the remaining 2 miles are through a beautiful, lush forest, with several mountain meadows interspersed along the way.

    Here is the first marshy meadow that we came to:


    There were several groves of old growth Incense Cedar trees that we passed through.



    Here are my hiking buddies for the weekend. What in the world happened to my daughter's backpack, you might be asking? Oh, that's right,I'm carrying it, on top of the 55 pound pack of my own. But don't let the older one fool you - I ended up carrying his pack as well for the last 3/4 mile. At least the dog carried his weight the whole way.


    Here is the view from our lake-side campground. As you can see, the lake is set in this alpine cirque with a towering granite cliff as the south backdrop. Beautiful spot, but due to its relatively easy access, it was somewhat busy with several other groups scattered around the lake. Not close enough to be bothersome, but still visible when looking around the area.

    To be fair to your son, the pack was as big as he was. That lake is beautiful, I need to check it out. Was this the trip where your dog was growling at deer all night and you got no sleep?

  12. #42
    The dude abides Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluegoose View Post
    One thing about those stoves -

    Since they do come from Hong Kong, or china or wherever, they estimate a longer shipping time. Mine took all of 4-6 weeks, as I recall.

    I see that there are some other vendors that are now selling them. Not sure if they are the same stove or not, but if you need it in the next little while you may want to look into another supplier.
    Mine came in two days. I can't believe how tiny it is.
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
    "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.
    "Juilliardk N I ibuprofen Hyu I U unhurt u" - creekster

  13. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    Mine came in two days. I can't believe how tiny it is.
    That's what she said.

  14. #44
    Senior Member Eddie's Avatar
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    So...as long as we're talking equipment.

    I've been looking to pick up a water filter. I've used the MSR sweetwater (with ceramic filter that you brush clean) and the Kataydn hiker (with a disposable filter that you replace when the filtering gets too slow).

    I like the idea of the MSR, but ended up having to clean the ceramic more than I'd like. But I assume that the Katadyn would slow at a similar rate.

    What's been your favorite brand/style of water filter for backpacking? Which do you find filter the most water at the best rate, etc.

  15. #45
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie View Post
    So...as long as we're talking equipment.

    I've been looking to pick up a water filter. I've used the MSR sweetwater (with ceramic filter that you brush clean) and the Kataydn hiker (with a disposable filter that you replace when the filtering gets too slow).

    I like the idea of the MSR, but ended up having to clean the ceramic more than I'd like. But I assume that the Katadyn would slow at a similar rate.

    What's been your favorite brand/style of water filter for backpacking? Which do you find filter the most water at the best rate, etc.
    I use the steri-pen and really like it. Drawbacks are that you can only do 1 liter at a time and of course that it is battery dependent.

    Last edited by SteelBlue; 02-23-2013 at 09:18 PM.

  16. #46
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
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    Wood burning stove that charges via usb; has anyone seen this concept yet? I saw it in a magazine last year, but haven't ever seen one in a store yet. When it first came out, it sounded like it would be a very slow charge, but with this new version it sounds like they're claiming same speed as charging off of a laptop. Interesting concept anyway:

    http://gearjunkie.com/wood-burning-s...city-generator


    Last edited by SteelBlue; 02-26-2013 at 10:16 AM.

  17. #47
    Huge Member BigPiney's Avatar
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    interesting idea, but most of my time is spent in areas where you can't burn wood, so it would do me no good.

  18. #48
    Bald not naked Pelado's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigPiney View Post
    interesting idea, but most of my time is spent in areas where you can't burn wood, so it would do me no good.
    What can you burn?
    "I think it was King Benjamin who said 'you sorry ass shitbags who have no skills that the market values also have an obligation to have the attitude that if one day you do in fact win the PowerBall Lottery that you will then impart of your substance to those without.'"
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  19. #49

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    I recently switched from a standard hand pump ceramic filter to a gravity filtration system. Its nice to scoop some water out of the creek or lake and just hang it up and let it work.

    In talking to some guys at the outdoors store here, they said most of the guys they go with use either the gravity filters or the steri-pens. My FIL in Wyoming recently switched to a Steri-pen and loves it.

    Mine will do almost 2 liters in a minute. And even though it is still a ceramic filter cleaning it is as simple as running a liter of water backwards through it to flush it out. No more scrubbing. It also has an adapter to hook it directly onto a camelback or onto a Nalgene bottle.

    It looks something like this:
    18666129_136497_full.jpg

  20. #50
    Striving for mediocrity Art Vandelay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluegoose View Post
    I recently switched from a standard hand pump ceramic filter to a gravity filtration system. Its nice to scoop some water out of the creek or lake and just hang it up and let it work.

    In talking to some guys at the outdoors store here, they said most of the guys they go with use either the gravity filters or the steri-pens. My FIL in Wyoming recently switched to a Steri-pen and loves it.

    Mine will do almost 2 liters in a minute. And even though it is still a ceramic filter cleaning it is as simple as running a liter of water backwards through it to flush it out. No more scrubbing. It also has an adapter to hook it directly onto a camelback or onto a Nalgene bottle.

    It looks something like this:
    18666129_136497_full.jpg
    Steri-pens are the way to go, IMO. Light, easy to use, and supposedly close to 100% effective. I bought my son the newer model last year, it is much less tempermental than my 3 YO one. It also didn't seem to use as batteries as quickly. I think they are well worth the investment.

  21. #51
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Art Vandelay View Post
    Steri-pens are the way to go, IMO. Light, easy to use, and supposedly close to 100% effective. I bought my son the newer model last year, it is much less tempermental than my 3 YO one. It also didn't seem to use as batteries as quickly. I think they are well worth the investment.
    I like mine a lot, but once had the batteries fail on me. I always bring back ups now.

  22. #52
    Huge Member BigPiney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pelado View Post
    What can you burn?
    gas

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    Last edited by BigPiney; 02-26-2013 at 12:51 PM.

  23. #53
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
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    MSR changing its 4oz fuel canister.

    http://adventuresinstoving.blogspot....-canister.html

    482204_486684828052920_1555759232_n.jpg

    Has a "fuel gauge" printed on side. Just drop it in a pot of water and where the water mark hits on the gauge is your fuel level. Kind of a cool idea.

    DSC00407.JPG
    Attached Images Attached Images

  24. #54

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    That is really cool. We're always trying to figure out if we should take what we have on hand or buy new for every outing. I once went into REI and asked the salesman how I could determine what I have in a tank. He shrugged.

  25. #55
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
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    I enjoy this guy's creativity when it comes to outdoorsmanship and gear. He comes up with all kinds of DIY gear. I thought this one about uses for plastic drinking straws was kind of cool. I like the waterproof fire starter idea at the beginning.


  26. #56
    Senior Member Eddie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteelBlue View Post
    I enjoy this guy's creativity when it comes to outdoorsmanship and gear. He comes up with all kinds of DIY gear. I thought this one about uses for plastic drinking straws was kind of cool. I like the waterproof fire starter idea at the beginning.

    That was pretty cool - thanks for sharing. And the yo-yo was awesome too.

  27. #57
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
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    Well, it wasn't backpacking, but I went on a great hike yesterday with the YM in our stake. Picture perfect hiking day with sun, low temps and occasional spritzes of rain. We hit the Castle Crags trail which for my money is one of the most rewarding, easy access trails that exists. The return on investment for this hike is pretty incredible. If you've ever driven on I5 in NorCal and seen the beautiful granite spires just south of Mt. Shasta you've seen some of Castle Crags.

    Here are some pics:

    The dome. The 2.7 mile trail ends at the base (when I say base, I mean that level area top left of the dome) of this beautiful granite formation. I don't know how steep that drop is but I'd guess it's close to 800 feet total.








    Last edited by SteelBlue; 05-20-2013 at 12:38 PM.

  28. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by SteelBlue View Post
    I enjoy this guy's creativity when it comes to outdoorsmanship and gear. He comes up with all kinds of DIY gear. I thought this one about uses for plastic drinking straws was kind of cool. I like the waterproof fire starter idea at the beginning.

    Is that guy from UT? His accent tells me he is.
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    pelagius

  29. #59
    Senior Member SteelBlue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pellegrino View Post
    Is that guy from UT? His accent tells me he is.
    Not sure, but I think he's from Idaho.

  30. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by SteelBlue View Post
    Not sure, but I think he's from Idaho.
    Idaho would work too. His vowels are very intermountain west. Just listen to how he pronounces the word "seal." For a moment I thought he was talking about windows.
    Dio perdona tante cose per un’opera di misericordia
    God forgives many things for an act of mercy
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    Knock it off. This board has enough problems without a dose of middle-age lechery.

    pelagius

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