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Thread: General Upgrades & Ideas

  1. #31

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    I'm doing some large beams made from 2x12s, one is 24 feet, and two are 22 feet. giving them an old beat up look. went at them with all manner of pillaging. axe, hatchet, chisels, chains, nails, awl (for worm holes), and rasp. Oh, and sander for the 24 foot beam since hands can touch the supports. The two 22 footers will be pulled up with ropes and secured to the ceiling joists. Each beam weighs quite a bit, but I'm fairly confident I can inch them up via a 3 rope system. My wife is not so sure. I know I will win.

    I'm a little nervous on the staining, as I don't want this to look pooey. We've stained several test pieces to get the right color and look. It will get a satin clear coat, or maybe a flat. haven't decided...

    I'm not very experienced with staining, and making things look believably old. I'm a little worried about doing it. Especially with all the time, $ and bodily soreness I've already invested in this enterprise.
    Anyone done this before? Tips, recommendations?

    Here are a few shots of what I've been doing to them.



    worm holes!!!








    These pictures didn't turn out great, but they kind of show the look on the single 24 foot beam. The bottom isn't finished as there is a support post going somewhere along it. So waiting required.




    here's from the other side, a little easier to see...



    And finally, last night we made some new plates. 24 plates for $24, and ceramic sharpies.
    I made a series of 4 plates, of cats wearing a baker hat. here is plate 1 in the series.

    Last edited by Brian; 05-05-2014 at 07:39 PM.
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  2. #32
    Adventurer Walter Sobchak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian View Post
    I'm a little nervous on the staining, as I don't want this to look pooey. We've stained several test pieces to get the right color and look. It will get a satin clear coat, or maybe a flat. haven't decided...

    I'm not very experienced with staining, and making things look believably old. I'm a little worried about doing it. Especially with all the time, $ and bodily soreness I've already invested in this enterprise.
    Anyone done this before? Tips, recommendations?
    I've done this before with some box beams. We used a dye/stain process to get the grain to "pop"; using a stain-only process just gave the wood a very flat appearance. The dye/stain process is not complex: apply the dye, wipe clean, allow to dry, apply stain, wipe clean, allow to dry, finish with a marine grade teak oil, wipe clean.

    Here is a sample picture:

    1204_beam_wrap_final_2.jpg

    To get the dye/stain solution, we took a finished wood sample we borrowed from a furniture store to a nearby paint store. We used a local place called Daly's, but one of the national chains (Sherwin Williams, et al) may also be able to help you.
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  3. #33

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    Got the big beasts up. Had to use two come-a-longs to get them up. It was harder than I thought it would be, but I did get them up without help from a single person.
    This led to an interesting discussion with my wife. I didn't have a come-a-long before Saturday. Now I have two. The come-a-long seems to be a tool that only the most ardent of DIYers will have. I bet that less than 4% of the population owns one. Let alone two. I'm willing to bet that everyone has a grizzled old second cousin with a shed full of tools. And buried in that mess somewhere is a come-a-long. It might take him a while to find it, but it's in there. And he'll gladly show you how to use it, how to crank her up, then flip the switch and crank it down. So then we started to identify people we know who likely had a come-a-long, and those who definitely did not. My daughter heard and came in to join the fun. A good time was had by all. Some people were clear cut, others required a little more debate. In every ward we have lived, it was pretty easy to identify the one guy who definately had a come-a-long. Maybe a nice family night activity for everyone.

    I believe that the come-a-long is a dividing tool. By definition it divides people into two groups, those with, and those without, but I think it's more than that. It divides the truly devoted, lifelong DIYer from the guy who fires up his Craftsman circular saw wearing his ironed 501s, stain-free lumberjack shirt with sleeves rolled up, and so-new-they-squeak leather work boots.

    So come at me bro. My come-a-long dexterity allows me to use them as nunchucks.

    Here they are after stain and satin coat. The discerning eye will notice the huge mark on the floor I caused when I accidentally kicked over a can of stain.





    Really heavy. Both fit like a glove right up against either wall.




    Two smaller beams for the entry way





    and even smaller beams installed in a hallway

    Last edited by Brian; 05-15-2014 at 07:58 AM.
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  4. #34
    The dude abides Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
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    Very cool, Brian.

    I don't own a come-a-long.

    But darn it, my dad has a pile of them and I can borrow one when I need to.
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
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  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    I don't own a come-a-long.
    Ya, we had you in that category.
    To be honest there was no debate about it.
    I intend to live forever.
    So far, so good.
    --Steven Wright

  6. #36
    Bald not naked Pelado's Avatar
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    Is there a special category for those who have no idea what a come-a-long is?
    "I think it was King Benjamin who said 'you sorry ass shitbags who have no skills that the market values also have an obligation to have the attitude that if one day you do in fact win the PowerBall Lottery that you will then impart of your substance to those without.'"
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  7. #37
    it's all a blur mtnbiker's Avatar
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    I've got a come-a-long. But I'd really like to see pics of yours in action with those big beams. Now you have to take them down to show the process.

  8. #38
    Senior Member Katy Lied's Avatar
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    nice beams and nice framing work.

  9. #39
    Senior Member Eddie's Avatar
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    I have a come a long.

    Just wanted to give you some material for your next discussion.

  10. #40

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    Beam has just acheived lift off from the saw horses. powered by two come-a-longs (the yellow straps, plus the big cranky thing up in the attic for you 96%-ers), and my biceps.



    Beam nearing it's destination. Orange power cord can be seen hanging down.




    Two beams in the entry way are sealed and hung in place. come-a-longs not required for this part.




    I intend to live forever.
    So far, so good.
    --Steven Wright

  11. #41
    Bald not naked Pelado's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian View Post
    Beam has just acheived lift off from the saw horses. powered by two come-a-longs (the yellow straps, plus the big cranky thing up in the attic for you 96%-ers), and my biceps.
    Thank you.
    "I think it was King Benjamin who said 'you sorry ass shitbags who have no skills that the market values also have an obligation to have the attitude that if one day you do in fact win the PowerBall Lottery that you will then impart of your substance to those without.'"
    - Goatnapper'96

  12. #42

    Default General Upgrades & Ideas

    So unless something drastic happens or the house doesn't appraise high enough, it looks like we just bought a house. Structurally the house is in great shape, and the kitchen has a lot of the upgraded features we want. The exterior cosmetics are fine. There are some glaring cosmetic updates needed on the inside, though. The house was built in the early aughts, but seems to carry with it some late 90s stylings (i.e. we'll be swapping out a lot of gold fixtures for brushed nickel, if you know what I mean). New floors and paint are priority 1A. Priority 1B will be figuring out what to do with the plexiglass inserts in the pony walls around the stairs and loft areas. For some reason, this was a fairly common trend amongst LV builders from about 1996 through 2003. It is a way to make the house feel more open without dropping $25k on railing/banisters, but there is no way around how hideous it is. Here's a pretty standard example of what I'm talking about:

    plexiglass.jpg


    With the amount of flooring we'll be installing, there just isn't money in the budget to knock the walls out and install railings. But the plexiglass has to go. One option, of course, is to knock those windows out, add some furring strips and just drywall right over the openings. I could even add a painted cap trim and under mold to the tops of the pony walls to deck them out a bit. Mrs. D is worried, however, that without a way to see through the walls, our younger kids will be tempted to climb up on the walls and peer over down into the open areas below. She's actually terrified about this.

    So here's my question: do you think there's a stylish way to insert some wrought-iron balusters into those openings?

    My other thought is maybe Brian can just take a week off and come to LV to install railing and banister for me? I wouldn't even make him do the nose trick if he didn't want to.







    Last edited by Donuthole; 05-21-2014 at 05:15 PM.
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  13. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donuthole View Post
    So unless something drastic happens or the house doesn't appraise high enough, it looks like we just bought a house. Structurally the house is in great shape, and the kitchen has a lot of the upgraded features we want. The exterior cosmetics are fine. There are some glaring cosmetic updates needed on the inside, though. The house was built in the early aughts, but seems to carry with it some late 90s stylings (i.e. we'll be swapping out a lot of gold fixtures for brushed nickel, if you know what I mean). New floors and paint are priority 1A. Priority 1B will be figuring out what to do with the plexiglass inserts in the pony walls around the stairs and loft areas. For some reason, this was a fairly common trend amongst LV builders from about 1996 through 2003. It is a way to make the house feel more open without dropping $25k on railing/banisters, but there is no way around how hideous it is. Here's a pretty standard example of what I'm talking about:

    plexiglass.jpg


    With the amount of flooring we'll be installing, there just isn't money in the budget to knock the walls out and install railings. But the plexiglass has to go. One option, of course, is to knock those windows out, add some furring strips and just drywall right over the openings. I could even add a painted cap trim and under mold to the tops of the pony walls to deck them out a bit. Mrs. D is worried, however, that without a way to see through the walls, our younger kids will be tempted to climb up on the walls and peer over down into the open areas below. She's actually terrified about this.

    So here's my question: do you think there's a stylish way to insert some wrought-iron balusters into those openings?

    My other thought is maybe Brian can just take a week off and come to LV to install railing and banister for me? I wouldn't even make him do the nose trick if he didn't want to.





    I've always like the look of wire, but it depends on how you plan to style the house.



    I don't know how the price compares, but it would be pretty easy to do. (drill some holes in side of pexiglass holes, stick in the wire thingys, tigten the wire). LV is way too hot now. my nose would melt in place.
    I intend to live forever.
    So far, so good.
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  14. #44
    The dude abides Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
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    Whoa. Is that a Nimbus 2000 on the wall at the bottom of the stairs?
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
    "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.
    "Juilliardk N I ibuprofen Hyu I U unhurt u" - creekster

  15. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian View Post
    I've always like the look of wire, but it depends on how you plan to style the house.



    I don't know how the price compares, but it would be pretty easy to do. (drill some holes in side of pexiglass holes, stick in the wire thingys, tigten the wire). LV is way too hot now. my nose would melt in place.
    I love contemporary style, while Mrs. D loves traditional style. We've both compromised with a contemporary craftsman plan going forward, though it will take a while to execute. While I love how clean wire railings look, I'm not sure anything horizontal is a good idea with young kids. My first kid didn't climb at all, but my last two have been climbers to the max. Still, that might be worth the < $50 it would cost to do one opening just to see how it would look.
    Prepare to put mustard on those words, for you will soon be consuming them, along with this slice of humble pie that comes direct from the oven of shame set at gas mark “egg on your face”! -- Moss

    There are three rules that I live by: never get less than twelve hours sleep; never play cards with a guy who has the same first name as a city; and never get involved with a woman with a tattoo of a dagger on her body. Now you stick to that, and everything else is cream cheese. --Coach Finstock

  16. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donuthole View Post
    I love contemporary style, while Mrs. D loves traditional style. We've both compromised with a contemporary craftsman plan going forward, though it will take a while to execute. While I love how clean wire railings look, I'm not sure anything horizontal is a good idea with young kids. My first kid didn't climb at all, but my last two have been climbers to the max. Still, that might be worth the < $50 it would cost to do one opening just to see how it would look.

    Hmmm... That's a chasm.
    Yes, if I had wires in our house growing up, I'm sure I'd be missing a few limbs. And my younger brothers would have more scars.
    I intend to live forever.
    So far, so good.
    --Steven Wright

  17. #47

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    captain beam is now done.



    Next project is either the barn, or new fencing. Probably will be the fencing.

    But either way we need a pad, so we had it poured last week.

    I did the forms myself, and the concrete guy said they were fine. Put a slope going both ways to get the water to drain properly. Really bonded with my spirit level, string and measuring tape through the whole process. Made sweet love when the whole project was complete.




    Put some 12" piers where the support posts would go.




    All ready for the final smoothing, then drag with a broom.

    I intend to live forever.
    So far, so good.
    --Steven Wright

  18. #48
    The dude abides Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
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    Nice work, Brian.
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
    "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.
    "Juilliardk N I ibuprofen Hyu I U unhurt u" - creekster

  19. #49
    𐐐𐐄𐐢𐐆𐐤𐐝 𐐓𐐅 𐐜 𐐢𐐃𐐡𐐔 Uncle Ted's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    Nice work, Brian.
    Indeed. BTW, that looks like some nice property.
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  20. #50
    sweet triple TripletDaddy's Avatar
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    Brian has some serious skills. Always impressed when he posts this stuff.

    Donute, you seem to be temporarily screwed, as those windows to the world are interesting, to say the least. I like the drywall option and that seems to be the most cost-efficient. The "fall to your death" concern seems a bit odd given that you are buying a two story open concept. In other words, the risk of climbing is there regardless of having plexiglass. Perhaps you can channel your wife's terror into a more compromising direction: tell her that the kids could lean into the plexiglass, knock out the plexiglass, and fall to their doom. She will immediately agree to the drywall and your house looks much better because of it.
    Fitter. Happier. More Productive.


  21. #51
    Time to camp HuskyFreeNorthwest's Avatar
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    You could add some kind of peep show feature that would frost the windows unless activated, then at casual moments with the HT/VT discreetly clear the window and show off your package.
    Get confident, stupid
    -landpoke

  22. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by TripletDaddy View Post
    Brian has some serious skills. Always impressed when he posts this stuff.
    I aspire to be as handy as Brian. My 3rd garage bay is a step towards that, as it will provide me with some much-needed workshop space.

    Donute, you seem to be temporarily screwed, as those windows to the world are interesting, to say the least. I like the drywall option and that seems to be the most cost-efficient. The "fall to your death" concern seems a bit odd given that you are buying a two story open concept. In other words, the risk of climbing is there regardless of having plexiglass. Perhaps you can channel your wife's terror into a more compromising direction: tell her that the kids could lean into the plexiglass, knock out the plexiglass, and fall to their doom. She will immediately agree to the drywall and your house looks much better because of it.
    I've tinkered around with the wrought-iron baluster idea a bit more and I think I can make something aesthetically pleasing for under $1000 total. The current plan is to drywall over the four windows in the worst locations (the two downstairs, and two up near the loft) live with the remaining plexiglass until I get wood flooring down in the entry/hall/kitchen and tile in the first-floor baths.
    Prepare to put mustard on those words, for you will soon be consuming them, along with this slice of humble pie that comes direct from the oven of shame set at gas mark “egg on your face”! -- Moss

    There are three rules that I live by: never get less than twelve hours sleep; never play cards with a guy who has the same first name as a city; and never get involved with a woman with a tattoo of a dagger on her body. Now you stick to that, and everything else is cream cheese. --Coach Finstock

  23. #53
    Somewhat Idahoan Drunk Tank's Avatar
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    Default Decomposed granite patio

    Figure I would put this here since it falls into the "general upgrades" category.

    The patio and walkways in my backyard are made from brick pavers, but there is a section where I assume used to be a hot tub, but now is a poorly done patio extension made from sand and flagstone pavers. The sand is loose and the flagstone is very un-even. Cats love it, I hate it! I am thinking of excavating that area and re-doing it with brick pavers so it matched the rest of the patio or re-doing it using stabilized decomposed granite. The area is approx. 13x15' and will be where I keep my smoker and grill and a prep table. I may even install a free standing patio cover with a ceiling fan/lights there, as there is already power stubbed up.

    I know what is involved with a paver patio, but has anyone installed a DG granite patio/walkway? I am not afraid to do the work myself, but if I can end up with a better finished product having someone else do the work, I am not opposed to that. Maybe do the prep myself and have the pro's do the finish work?

    Thoughts?
    "I can get a good look at a T-bone by sticking my head up a bull's a$$, but I'd rather take a butcher's word for it". - Tommy Callahan III

  24. #54

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    Instead of furthering the lunch thread divergence, i'll respond here:

    Quote Originally Posted by falafel View Post
    Did you do anything in the kitchen yet? Painting done?
    Painting is done. Tile in laundry room/hall/powder room is set and will be grouted tonight. That tile took me 4x longer than I expected. Part of that is because I underestimated the difficulty of the area (three connected areas separated by two walls which turn 45 degrees), part of it is because I decided to cut the 16" square tiles into 8x16 rectangles (leaving me twice as many tile to set) and part of it is because I refused to take the easy way out and leave a seam under the doors. In order to make the tile all one uninterrupted pattern and ensure that the tile was running strait in the hallway (the most visible area of the three) I had to start in the middle and work my way out to the areas on either side. This resulted in some tricky cuts and some awkward positions (not those positions, sickos!) while tiling and also meant I had to work backwards in a couple spots. Here is one cut I'm particularly proud of:

    Angle1.jpg
    Angle2.jpg
    Angle3.jpg

    All of this cost me a lot of time, especially since I'm working in 3-5 hour increments after work. Tiling is not really a process that is meant to me started and stopped numerous times, as there's about 30 mins of prep each time you start and 30 mins of cleaning each time you stop. That said, the area came out looking great. I can't wait to see how it looks once it's grouted:

    tile hallway.jpg

    The master bath will go much faster, as it is essentially one open space, and i'm using much larger tile.
    Prepare to put mustard on those words, for you will soon be consuming them, along with this slice of humble pie that comes direct from the oven of shame set at gas mark “egg on your face”! -- Moss

    There are three rules that I live by: never get less than twelve hours sleep; never play cards with a guy who has the same first name as a city; and never get involved with a woman with a tattoo of a dagger on her body. Now you stick to that, and everything else is cream cheese. --Coach Finstock

  25. #55
    My Mic Sounds Nice falafel's Avatar
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    I like the rectangles, good call on that. Are those tiles grey? It like it. The pattern kinda looks like the iPad background you sometimes see.

    Ain't it like most people, I'm no different. We love to talk on things we don't know about.

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  26. #56

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    Quote Originally Posted by falafel View Post
    I like the rectangles, good call on that. Are those tiles grey? It like it. The pattern kinda looks like the iPad background you sometimes see.

    Yes, grey with hints of brown. They sort of have the texture of a finely-woven burlap (if such a thing exists).
    Prepare to put mustard on those words, for you will soon be consuming them, along with this slice of humble pie that comes direct from the oven of shame set at gas mark “egg on your face”! -- Moss

    There are three rules that I live by: never get less than twelve hours sleep; never play cards with a guy who has the same first name as a city; and never get involved with a woman with a tattoo of a dagger on her body. Now you stick to that, and everything else is cream cheese. --Coach Finstock

  27. #57
    My Mic Sounds Nice falafel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donuthole View Post
    Yes, grey with hints of brown. They sort of have the texture of a finely-woven burlap (if such a thing exists).
    I think its called linen.
    Ain't it like most people, I'm no different. We love to talk on things we don't know about.

    "The only one of us who is so significant that Jeff owes us something simply because he decided to grace us with his presence is falafel." -- All-American

    GIVE 'EM HELL, BRIGHAM!

  28. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by falafel View Post
    I think its called linen.
    Good call.
    Prepare to put mustard on those words, for you will soon be consuming them, along with this slice of humble pie that comes direct from the oven of shame set at gas mark “egg on your face”! -- Moss

    There are three rules that I live by: never get less than twelve hours sleep; never play cards with a guy who has the same first name as a city; and never get involved with a woman with a tattoo of a dagger on her body. Now you stick to that, and everything else is cream cheese. --Coach Finstock

  29. #59
    aka Benito Hazard thesaint258's Avatar
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    I think it looks great, DH. Especially since it would be an absolute mess if I tried to do the same thing.
    Not that, sickos.

  30. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donuthole View Post
    Instead of furthering the lunch thread divergence, i'll respond here:



    Painting is done. Tile in laundry room/hall/powder room is set and will be grouted tonight. That tile took me 4x longer than I expected. Part of that is because I underestimated the difficulty of the area (three connected areas separated by two walls which turn 45 degrees), part of it is because I decided to cut the 16" square tiles into 8x16 rectangles (leaving me twice as many tile to set) and part of it is because I refused to take the easy way out and leave a seam under the doors. In order to make the tile all one uninterrupted pattern and ensure that the tile was running strait in the hallway (the most visible area of the three) I had to start in the middle and work my way out to the areas on either side. This resulted in some tricky cuts and some awkward positions (not those positions, sickos!) while tiling and also meant I had to work backwards in a couple spots. Here is one cut I'm particularly proud of:

    Angle1.jpg
    Angle2.jpg
    Angle3.jpg

    All of this cost me a lot of time, especially since I'm working in 3-5 hour increments after work. Tiling is not really a process that is meant to me started and stopped numerous times, as there's about 30 mins of prep each time you start and 30 mins of cleaning each time you stop. That said, the area came out looking great. I can't wait to see how it looks once it's grouted:

    tile hallway.jpg

    The master bath will go much faster, as it is essentially one open space, and i'm using much larger tile.

    I just saw these. Very nice work. And nice shoe.
    Those tile cuts are a pain, but something you'll always admire.
    Tile on brother. Did you do the grout yet? Or are you just slacker on posting them?
    I intend to live forever.
    So far, so good.
    --Steven Wright

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