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Thread: Other planets

  1. #1
    Receiver of Memory LA Ute's Avatar
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    Default Other planets

    Popular Mechanics:

    NASA announced today that the Kepler space telescope has spotted some 1200 planets in a four-month period of observation, including 68 Earth-size planets. We talked to William Borucki, the principle investigator of the mission, about Kepler’s successes, whether there is life on other planets and what the future holds for the telescope.
    Too bad we can't hie to them all in the twinkling of an eye and see who's there.
    Last edited by LA Ute; 02-03-2011 at 02:46 PM.
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    sweet triple TripletDaddy's Avatar
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    Cleon Skousen is vindicated.

    The Kepler space telescope didnt happen to see any dinosaurs or lost tribes hanging out on these planets, did it?
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    My understanding is that Kolob is, well, like a giant crystal or someting. Sounds really boring.

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    Receiver of Memory LA Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TripletDaddy View Post
    Cleon Skousen is vindicated.

    The Kepler space telescope didnt happen to see any dinosaurs or lost tribes hanging out on these planets, did it?
    Reportedly the Kepler saw some Earth-size planets with large sections missing. This fits in with the widely-accepted understanding that certain planets did have dinosaurs, but that was because they were used in a planet and organism-creation practicum (in an Eternal Progression master's degree program). Chunks of these planets were used to create Earth, which explains so-called "prehistoric" fossils.
    Last edited by LA Ute; 02-03-2011 at 03:48 PM.
    “There is a great deal of difference in believing something still, and believing it again.”
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    "God made the angels to show His splendour - as He made animals for innocence and plants for their simplicity. But men and women He made to serve Him wittily, in the tangle of their minds."
    -- Robert Bolt, A Man for All Seasons


    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
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    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    Reportedly the Kepler saw some Earth-size planets with large sections missing. This fits in with the widely-accepted understanding that certain planets did have dinosaurs, but that was because they were used in a planet and organism-creation practicum (in an Eternal Progression master's degree program). Chunks of these planets were used to create Earth, which explains so-called "prehistoric" fossils.
    Honestly LA I've had more than one person look me in the eye and tell me exactly that.
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    אלוף NorthwestUteFan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Borderline Divine View Post
    Honestly LA I've had more than one person look me in the eye and tell me exactly that.
    Apparently those people have never experienced the joy of digging their own ditches. Any kid who spent more than five minutes in a sandbox could tell you the sand/dirt will fall toward the lowest point in the absense of any support. Take a big enough chunk out of a planet and it will collapse in on itself.

    Boom Ditches!

    It is fascinating how quickly they are finding new planets considering the very first planet outside of our solar system was discovered within the last 15 years. 1200 in 4 months is amazing.

    Question: How many of these planets are within the Milky Way Galaxy? I assume most of them.

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    The dude abides Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorthwestUteFan View Post
    Apparently those people have never experienced the joy of digging their own ditches. Any kid who spent more than five minutes in a sandbox could tell you the sand/dirt will fall toward the lowest point in the absense of any support. Take a big enough chunk out of a planet and it will collapse in on itself.

    Boom Ditches!
    Umm.... Yeah. That's the reason this doesn't make sense. The dirt will fall in.

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    אלוף NorthwestUteFan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    Umm.... Yeah. That's the reason this doesn't make sense. The dirt will fall in.

    Don't be fatuous, Jeffrey. I was just looking for an opening to use the stupid ditch line.

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    Receiver of Memory LA Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    Umm.... Yeah. That's the reason this doesn't make sense. The dirt will fall in.

    But we don't know what celestial engineering techniques were used. Oh, ye of little faith....

    Seriously, I do find these sorts of discoveries fascinating. The vastness of space has always fascinated me. That's why I keep posting that photo of the Sombrero Galaxy here. I never get tired of contemplating that one.
    Last edited by LA Ute; 02-03-2011 at 04:36 PM.
    “There is a great deal of difference in believing something still, and believing it again.”
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    "God made the angels to show His splendour - as He made animals for innocence and plants for their simplicity. But men and women He made to serve Him wittily, in the tangle of their minds."
    -- Robert Bolt, A Man for All Seasons


    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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    BTW, how much does someone need to spend on decent telescope that will allow them to get a pretty good views of Mars, Jupiter, nebulas and galaxies? I live in a place where I could probably get some pretty clear views (clean air, dark nights).
    Part of it is based on academic grounds. Among major conferences, the Pac-10 is the best academically, largely because of Stanford, Cal and UCLA. “Colorado is on a par with Oregon,” he said. “Utah isn’t even in the picture.”

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    The dude abides Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorthwestUteFan View Post
    Don't be fatuous, Jeffrey. I was just looking for an opening to use the stupid ditch line.
    Aha.. the belabored setup.

    BTW, did you fix the cable?
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    The dude abides Jeff Lebowski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    But we don't know what celestial engineering techniques were used. Oh, ye of little faith....

    Seriously, I do find these sorts of discoveries fascinating. The vastness of space has always fascinated me. That's why I keep posting that photo of the Sombrero Galaxy here. I never get tired of contemplating that one.
    Yep. It definitely bakes the old noodle.
    "There is no creature more arrogant than a self-righteous libertarian on the web, am I right? Those folks are just intolerable."
    "It's no secret that the great American pastime is no longer baseball. Now it's sanctimony." -- Guy Periwinkle, The Nix.
    "Juilliardk N I ibuprofen Hyu I U unhurt u" - creekster

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    אלוף NorthwestUteFan's Avatar
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    I was distracted by something or other. But I did leave with stars in my eyes.

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    Receiver of Memory LA Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Color Me Badd Fan View Post
    BTW, how much does someone need to spend on decent telescope that will allow them to get a pretty good views of Mars, Jupiter, nebulas and galaxies? I live in a place where I could probably get some pretty clear views (clean air, dark nights).

    We got a pretty decent one for about $500 a few years ago, but if you really want to see things you need to spend more. I haven't priced that stuff for about 10 years. My son got his Astronomy merit badge and became very engrossed in the subject. He knew the night sky very well.

    Now I am going to inflict my photos on you all again:



    The Sombrero Galaxy, 28 million light years from Earth. Voted best picture taken by the Hubble telescope. The galaxy has 800 billion suns and is 50,000 light years across.



    The Cone Nebula. The part pictured here is 2.5 light years in length (the equivalent of 23 million return trips to the Moon).



    From 114 million light years away, these are the swirling cores of two merging galaxies called NGC 2207 and IC 2163 in the Canis Major constellation.



    Astronomers call this a 'stellar nursery', 9,000 light years from here, where new stars are being born.
    “There is a great deal of difference in believing something still, and believing it again.”
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    "God made the angels to show His splendour - as He made animals for innocence and plants for their simplicity. But men and women He made to serve Him wittily, in the tangle of their minds."
    -- Robert Bolt, A Man for All Seasons


    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
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    No pun intended filsdepac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorthwestUteFan View Post
    It is fascinating how quickly they are finding new planets considering the very first planet outside of our solar system was discovered within the last 15 years. 1200 in 4 months is amazing.
    I'm hoping within 30 years or so we will have control of these planets and can start directing life as a superior species. My years of experience playing Sid Meier's Civilization will make me a frontrunner in leading this Project Genesis.

    When I think about the vastness of space, I get really uncomfortable. Not like when I think about what's in my chicken mcnugget, but still, pretty uncomfortable.

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    Invisible Swordsman DrumNFeather's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    But we don't know what celestial engineering techniques were used. Oh, ye of little faith....

    Seriously, I do find these sorts of discoveries fascinating. The vastness of space has always fascinated me. That's why I keep posting that photo of the Sombrero Galaxy here. I never get tired of contemplating that one.
    It's the final frontier.
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    It is NOT a monkey! creekster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Borderline Divine View Post
    Honestly LA I've had more than one person look me in the eye and tell me exactly that.
    That's because they read Doctrines of Salvation by Joseph Fielding Smith, which includes this speculation.
    PLesa excuse the tpyos.

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    Local Character clackamascoug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wally View Post
    My understanding is that Kolob is, well, like a giant crystal or someting. Sounds really boring.
    Not to nit-pick but God resides "nigh unto Kolob," not on Kolob.

    Boring is Utah in the winter, below 4,000 feet.

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  19. #19
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    New Era:

    https://www.lds.org/new-era/1971/04/...orlds?lang=eng
    People on Other Worlds

    Since Neal Armstrong stepped from the ladder of Intrepid II and placed his foot on the moon’s powdery surface, the human mind has turned with increasing interest and fascination to thoughts of outer space. Science fiction writers have suddenly become respectable.


    Age-old questions again come to the surface: Is our earth the only world in all of space that has intelligent inhabitants? Or is there life on other worlds—perhaps intelligent beings like ourselves or maybe even more intelligent than ourselves? Might they visit us?
    […]

    Ensign:

    https://www.lds.org/ensign/1973/01/w...space?lang=eng
    Warnings from Outer Space
    PRESIDENT N. ELDON TANNER


    It is a privilege indeed, but a heavy responsibility, to address this vast audience in this historic Tabernacle and those who are listening in; and I humbly pray that the spirit and blessings of the Lord will attend us this lovely Sabbath morning.


    Conditions in the world today have caused me to ponder over an editorial which I read recently. It states:


    “A German astronomer believes that ‘the earth’s young civilization is now approaching its first great crisis because of its newly found powers of self-destruction,’ and ‘man’s best hope of avoiding disaster is to listen hard for radioed advice coming from far out in starry space.’


    “Out there, somewhere, this scientist believes, is a wise old civilization that has survived many crises and is trying to warn the callow earth against the mistakes of its own youth.
    […]
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    it's all a blur mtnbiker's Avatar
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    Since Neal Armstrong stepped from the ladder of Intrepid II and placed his foot on the moon’s powdery surface,
    Intrepid II????? That's pathetic. And that was written only 2 years after the event? "Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed."

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker View Post
    Intrepid II????? That's pathetic. And that was written only 2 years after the event? "Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed."


    The USS Intrepid II (registry NCC-1730 or NCC-1708) was a Constitution-class Federation starship in service in the late 23rd century.
    […]
    http://memory-beta.wikia.com/wiki/US...pid_(NCC-1730)

    "If there is one thing I am, it's always right." -Ted Nugent.
    "I honestly believe saying someone is a smart lawyer is damning with faint praise. The smartest people become engineers and scientists." -SU.
    "Yet I still see wisdom in that which Uncle Ted posts." -creek.
    GIVE 'EM HELL, BRIGHAM!

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    Joycelyn Elders Supporter SoonerCoug's Avatar
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    Are you guys laughing at Mormonism or are you being serious?

    If you're being serious about Kolob and so on, I want you to know that I think you are batty.
    That which may be asserted without evidence may be dismissed without evidence. -C. Hitchens

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  23. #23
    sweet triple TripletDaddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoonerCoug View Post
    Are you guys laughing at Mormonism or are you being serious?

    If you're being serious about Kolob and so on, I want you to know that I think you are batty.
    this is thread concept is kind of funny but I'm not surprised it was started by LA Ute. How many times has he used that pic of the sombrero galaxy in a religious context?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Color Me Badd Fan View Post
    BTW, how much does someone need to spend on decent telescope that will allow them to get a pretty good views of Mars, Jupiter, nebulas and galaxies? I live in a place where I could probably get some pretty clear views (clean air, dark nights).
    I think you would be happy with the following.

    http://www.telescope.com/catalog/pro...ion%2Bjunction


    You spend starting off about $2k, and can add focal reducers and barlow lenses, for field of view and magnifications adjustments. You won't see anything like what the Hubble produces, but smudges for galaxies and star clusters, but for planetary observation you can see quite a bit. Btw, what did you end up buying?

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    Local Character clackamascoug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wally View Post
    My understanding is that Kolob is, well, like a giant crystal or someting. Sounds really boring.
    Under the better late than never heading...

    A crystal planet has got to have the best DL speeds in the universe. I'm betting a trillion gigabytes.

    Did I just quote wally twice 3 years apart?
    Last edited by clackamascoug; 04-23-2014 at 07:31 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by clackamascoug View Post
    Under the better late than never heading...

    A crystal planet has got to have the best DL speeds in the universe. I'm betting a trillion gigabytes.
    that has to be worth something.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Topper View Post
    I think you would be happy with the following.

    http://www.telescope.com/catalog/pro...ion%2Bjunction


    You spend starting off about $2k, and can add focal reducers and barlow lenses, for field of view and magnifications adjustments. You won't see anything like what the Hubble produces, but smudges for galaxies and star clusters, but for planetary observation you can see quite a bit. Btw, what did you end up buying?

    Now if you want to see planets orbiting other suns you would have to build something like this… and then put it in space:

    https://www.ted.com/talks/jeremy_kas...h_like_planets

    Astronomers believe that every star in the galaxy has a planet, one fifth of which might harbor life. Only we haven't seen any of them — yet. Jeremy Kasdin and his team are looking to change that with the design and engineering of an extraordinary piece of equipment: a flower petal-shaped "starshade" positioned 50,000 km from a telescope to enable imaging of planets about distant stars. It is, he says, the "coolest possible science."
    "If there is one thing I am, it's always right." -Ted Nugent.
    "I honestly believe saying someone is a smart lawyer is damning with faint praise. The smartest people become engineers and scientists." -SU.
    "Yet I still see wisdom in that which Uncle Ted posts." -creek.
    GIVE 'EM HELL, BRIGHAM!

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Ted View Post
    Now if you want to see planets orbiting other suns you would have to build something like this… and then put it in space:

    https://www.ted.com/talks/jeremy_kas...h_like_planets
    Hmmm. I want one of those.

    Plus I want one of these. Some are almost affordable.

    http://www.privateislandsonline.com/

  29. #29

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    https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6964

    The Super-Earth that Came Home for Dinner

    "
    It might be lingering bashfully on the icy outer edges of our solar system, hiding in the dark, but subtly pulling strings behind the scenes: stretching out the orbits of distant bodies, perhaps even tilting the entire solar system to one side ... Breadcrumb number three: Computer simulations of the solar system with Planet Nine included show there should be more objects tilted with respect to the solar plane. In fact, the tilt would be on the order of 90 degrees, as if the plane of the solar system and these objects formed an "X" when viewed edge-on. Sure enough, Brown realized that five such objects already known to astronomers fill the bill."

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