Page 2 of 67 FirstFirst 12341252 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 60 of 1988

Thread: The Official Thread for Runners

  1. #31

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie View Post
    OK - so maybe this is a dumb question with an obvious answer that I should just know. But I don't.

    My approach has always been to get faster by running faster, longer, etc. Obviously the longer runs are a little slower than the shorter runs - but just run as fast as you can while still feeling good and maintaining a general pace.

    In looking at training schedules intended to prepare a person for for longer races, it seems like they are always talking about going slower than race pace on long runs. So the thought occurs to me - if you are always running slow, how in the world are you supposed to get fast?


    So - what is the benefit of running a slower pace than you anticipate racing at? Help me understand why I should run at a 8:30 or 9 minute pace if I can do 8?
    The concern is injury. Your race pace is going to happen after a few weeks of tapering, and will take you a few days to recover from. It's not a pace youre capable of incorporating into your regular ttraining without some recovery time. More beneficial to run long and slow, where you just focus on acclimating your body to the cumulative stress and leave the speedwork to shorter runs.

    Of course, piney (and his wife) is way faster than I am, so take that for what its worth.
    At least the Big Ten went after a big-time addition in Nebraska; the Pac-10 wanted a game so badly, it added Utah
    -Berry Trammel, 12/3/10

  2. #32
    Liberal Feminazi Pheidippides's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    14,762

    Default

    I'm officially going to jump on the barefoot wagon after this next marathon. My wife is getting me a pair of VFF Bikilas for Xmas. I've been going more midfoot with my striking lately and I am hopeful this will make my form even better. Obviously I am going to take things slow (a mile at most the first time out) but I will return and report.
    Awesomeness now has a name. Let me introduce myself.

  3. #33

    Default

    This is a good question. Most of the books and articles on the subject of marathon training suggest going 45-60 secs slower than marathon pace for long runs. But getting a good answer as to why is harder to come by. As ER mentioned, some recommend it for injury prevention. Others say to do it to help train the aerobic system by keeping intensity well below lactate levels. Others recommend slower pacing just to keep you on your feet longer without putting in too many miles working up to 26.2.

    Hal Higdons website just says something like, "Go slower on your long runs. You'll just have to trust me on this one."

    One of my buddies has a problem with this approach as well. He has done 3:25 marathons a couple of times and has followed the traditional method. This year he is trying something different and is doing his long runs at a negative split, with the second half of the run faster than marathon pace. He is also going to try to do more than the three 20 milers that he has done in the past. His reasoning is "How can you possibly expect your body to go at a pace you've rarely run, for a distance that you haven't run without training to do so?" Its hard logic to argue with. We'll see if he can do it this year without injuries.

  4. #34
    Liberal Feminazi Pheidippides's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    14,762

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bluegoose View Post
    This is a good question. Most of the books and articles on the subject of marathon training suggest going 45-60 secs slower than marathon pace for long runs. But getting a good answer as to why is harder to come by. As ER mentioned, some recommend it for injury prevention. Others say to do it to help train the aerobic system by keeping intensity well below lactate levels. Others recommend slower pacing just to keep you on your feet longer without putting in too many miles working up to 26.2.

    Hal Higdons website just says something like, "Go slower on your long runs. You'll just have to trust me on this one."

    One of my buddies has a problem with this approach as well. He has done 3:25 marathons a couple of times and has followed the traditional method. This year he is trying something different and is doing his long runs at a negative split, with the second half of the run faster than marathon pace. He is also going to try to do more than the three 20 milers that he has done in the past. His reasoning is "How can you possibly expect your body to go at a pace you've rarely run, for a distance that you haven't run without training to do so?" Its hard logic to argue with. We'll see if he can do it this year without injuries.
    I have to say as a counterpoint, though, that I ran my long runs for my first marathon very fast - maybe 30 seconds or faster off of race pace - on the theory your friend had. I ran 2 20 milers too. Result: disaster and the wall.

    My second marathon I ran at a pace that was a full minute or more slower than hoped pace. And I only managed one 20. Result: no wall and a sub 4 finish.

    How much of that is just about my overall shape getting better? I don't know.
    Awesomeness now has a name. Let me introduce myself.

  5. #35

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nikuman View Post
    I have to say as a counterpoint, though, that I ran my long runs for my first marathon very fast - maybe 30 seconds or faster off of race pace - on the theory your friend had. I ran 2 20 milers too. Result: disaster and the wall.

    My second marathon I ran at a pace that was a full minute or more slower than hoped pace. And I only managed one 20. Result: no wall and a sub 4 finish.

    How much of that is just about my overall shape getting better? I don't know.
    As a counterpoint to your counterpoint, my first marathon I only got one 20 miler (closer to 19 miles), at a pace at least a full minute slower than pace. I hit the wall in spectacular fashion that year.

    Last year I got three 20 milers in at about 30-45 seconds off marathon pace and did much better. No real wall, and about 40 minutes faster than the previous year.

    My conclusion is similar to yours. I think we were both just untrained rookies our first year that had a far too ambitious finishing time for a first marathon.

  6. #36
    Liberal Feminazi Pheidippides's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    14,762

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bluegoose View Post
    As a counterpoint to your counterpoint, my first marathon I only got one 20 miler (closer to 19 miles), at a pace at least a full minute slower than pace. I hit the wall in spectacular fashion that year.

    Last year I got three 20 milers in at about 30-45 seconds off marathon pace and did much better. No real wall, and about 40 minutes faster than the previous year.

    My conclusion is similar to yours. I think we were both just untrained rookies our first year that had a far too ambitious finishing time for a first marathon.
    Yeah, that's my conclusion. I view untrained rookies as new parents: full of hope, piss and vinegar but short on experience and wisdom.

    (I say this while training for what is only my third).
    Awesomeness now has a name. Let me introduce myself.

  7. #37

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie View Post
    OK - so maybe this is a dumb question with an obvious answer that I should just know. But I don't.

    My approach has always been to get faster by running faster, longer, etc. Obviously the longer runs are a little slower than the shorter runs - but just run as fast as you can while still feeling good and maintaining a general pace.

    In looking at training schedules intended to prepare a person for for longer races, it seems like they are always talking about going slower than race pace on long runs. So the thought occurs to me - if you are always running slow, how in the world are you supposed to get fast?


    So - what is the benefit of running a slower pace than you anticipate racing at? Help me understand why I should run at a 8:30 or 9 minute pace if I can do 8?
    As others have said, it basically is about not asking the body to do more than it can handle. Running a long, slow run may not help push your anaerobic threshold but it does help your body develop endurance by strengthening connective tissue and building strength where it is needed. Other runs (eg tempo) can be the ones where you get closer to race pace.

    I guess a few people are able to just go out and run fast, but by far most runners I know run into the same human limitations and have to figure out how to train in a smart way.

    If you want an example of what happens when you get too excited and push too hard, look no further than me. I've been careful with the mileage increase rule, been careful with interspersing easier runs, etc. And I still ended up hurt--I've been out two weeks with a hip flexor strain and after running a couple test miles this morning, I'm guessing it's gonna be at least another week.

    Why? My best guess is that I got over-enamored with my goal of a 19:59 5k and bit off more than I could chew. Looking back at my log, the pain started in the two weeks where I trained the hardest I had to that point. (I think the chief culprit was speedwork that was too ambitious). The result is an overuse injury that I can recover from and learn from, but that is disappointing to say the least.

    So if you're one of the lucky few and can just push it and get away with it, more power to you. I'm jealous. But if you're more human than machine you may want to keep your ambitions in check while your body catches up.

  8. #38

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OhioBlue View Post
    As others have said, it basically is about not asking the body to do more than it can handle. Running a long, slow run may not help push your anaerobic threshold but it does help your body develop endurance by strengthening connective tissue and building strength where it is needed. Other runs (eg tempo) can be the ones where you get closer to race pace.

    I guess a few people are able to just go out and run fast, but by far most runners I know run into the same human limitations and have to figure out how to train in a smart way.

    If you want an example of what happens when you get too excited and push too hard, look no further than me. I've been careful with the mileage increase rule, been careful with interspersing easier runs, etc. And I still ended up hurt--I've been out two weeks with a hip flexor strain and after running a couple test miles this morning, I'm guessing it's gonna be at least another week.

    Why? My best guess is that I got over-enamored with my goal of a 19:59 5k and bit off more than I could chew. Looking back at my log, the pain started in the two weeks where I trained the hardest I had to that point. (I think the chief culprit was speedwork that was too ambitious). The result is an overuse injury that I can recover from and learn from, but that is disappointing to say the least.

    So if you're one of the lucky few and can just push it and get away with it, more power to you. I'm jealous. But if you're more human than machine you may want to keep your ambitions in check while your body catches up.
    Yup. There are a few runners who can get away with breaking rules, but unless you're sure you're one of them, trust the schedule. Nothing sucks worse than having to ditch your schedule because of an injury. Sorry to hear that, Ohio. Remember to keep yourself healthy so you can return to the homeland for the Cedar Half--it's a great race!

    The other thing about long and slow is that I think it's good for perspective. We're all doing this at least partially for fun, and it's good to forget about pace once a week and just enjoy running. At least for me, anyway.
    Last edited by ERCougar; 12-06-2010 at 04:26 PM.
    At least the Big Ten went after a big-time addition in Nebraska; the Pac-10 wanted a game so badly, it added Utah
    -Berry Trammel, 12/3/10

  9. #39

    Default

    Also...
    Why is it that we runners only get a stinkin thread while the cyclists get their own forum? I demand equality!
    At least the Big Ten went after a big-time addition in Nebraska; the Pac-10 wanted a game so badly, it added Utah
    -Berry Trammel, 12/3/10

  10. #40
    Liberal Feminazi Pheidippides's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    14,762

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ERCougar View Post
    Yup. There are a few runners who can get away with breaking rules, but unless you're sure you're one of them, trust the schedule. Nothing sucks worse than having to ditch your schedule because of an injury. Sorry to hear that, Ohio. Remember to keep yourself healthy so you can return to the homeland for the Cedar Half--it's a great race!

    The other thing about long and slow is that I think it's good for perspective. We're all doing this for, and it's good to forget about pace once a week and just enjoy running. At least for me, anyway.
    I am exhibit A in this. Last year I got caught up in beating bluegoose in the mileage competition. Trouble was that I'd only been running a few months and he'd been running for some time. I set myself back with injuries.

    I'm determined not to let that happen again with my VFF, so I am going to break them in with a couch to 5k program.
    Awesomeness now has a name. Let me introduce myself.

  11. #41

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ERCougar View Post
    Yup. There are a few runners who can get away with breaking rules, but unless you're sure you're one of them, trust the schedule. Nothing sucks worse than having to ditch your schedule because of an injury. Sorry to hear that, Ohio. Remember to keep yourself healthy so you can return to the homeland for the Cedar Half--it's a great race!

    The other thing about long and slow is that I think it's good for perspective. We're all doing this at least partially for fun, and it's good to forget about pace once a week and just enjoy running. At least for me, anyway.
    Totally with you on the enjoyment of a long, slower run. I can't say that running itself is often 'fun' for me, but on those LSD runs it gets there, and I have stretches where I'm just groovin'.

    The hip thing sucks but I'm trying to stay patient. I think my body is also telling me "hey this is what happens when you try to start running at age 35!" I'm realizing my knees/ITB/tendons are probably bearing more than they should due to muscular weaknesses in my core, glutes, abductors/adductors, etc. I've been working in some appropriate strength training to hopefully help, nothing too aggressive but just to address the underlying weaknesses. In the meantime I'm dying for something else to do besides lifting upper body, core workouts, and table tennis.

    You'll have to remind me about the Cedar half as it gets closer, I'll definitely think about it.

  12. #42
    Board Bookworm happyone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    North Davis County
    Posts
    4,548

    Default

    I guess I am also an example of this - as some of you know I mainly walk/run to control my blood sugar. When I was first starting I would press too hard and end up with knee and hip problems (my weight probably had something to do with it also) Now I keep the jogs to 3, 4 times a week and just walk the off days. It seems to have worked

    I really admire you marathoners

    The only problem I had is if there is a way to roll your ankle I will find it! I rolled it today on an uneven sidewalk

    I may be small, but I'm slow.

    A veteran - whether active duty, retired, or national guard or reserve is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to, "The United States of America ", for an amount of "up to and including my life - it's an honor."

  13. #43

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OhioBlue View Post
    You'll have to remind me about the Cedar half as it gets closer, I'll definitely think about it.
    Will do. You've got a place to stay if you do it. It's a super-fast race and I think it'll get more popular as people figure that out. Plus--it's Cedar Canyon.

    In the meantime, I've got a table. Right now, Mrs. Solon is 4-1 against me, but maybe by the time I can beat her, I can give you a game.
    At least the Big Ten went after a big-time addition in Nebraska; the Pac-10 wanted a game so badly, it added Utah
    -Berry Trammel, 12/3/10

  14. #44
    Liberal Feminazi Pheidippides's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    14,762

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by happyone View Post
    I guess I am also an example of this - as some of you know I mainly walk/run to control my blood sugar. When I was first starting I would press too hard and end up with knee and hip problems (my weight probably had something to do with it also) Now I keep the jogs to 3, 4 times a week and just walk the off days. It seems to have worked

    I really admire you marathoners

    The only problem I had is if there is a way to roll your ankle I will find it! I rolled it today on an uneven sidewalk
    I hear you! I am a pro at rolling my ankle as well. I was starting out on a 15 miler for my last marathon when, at mile 2, I took a shortcut across some grass and stepped in a gopher hole. I did the smart thing and called my wife to pick me up, unlike the previous time when I tried to gut it out and ended up taking a week off.
    Awesomeness now has a name. Let me introduce myself.

  15. #45
    One man.....one pie Moliere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    The Republic of Tejas
    Posts
    20,885

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nikuman View Post
    I am exhibit A in this. Last year I got caught up in beating bluegoose in the mileage competition. Trouble was that I'd only been running a few months and he'd been running for some time. I set myself back with injuries.

    I'm determined not to let that happen again with my VFF, so I am going to break them in with a couch to 5k program.
    I've experienced this in the past as well. I've tried to starting running several times and I always push it too hard. I've suffered stress factures, shin splints, incredible soreness, etc. This time I consciously held back. Sometimes I finished a 2 mile run and felt like I could do more but I stopped myself. So far so good on being injury free but I'm only 3.5 months into running.

    And as OhioBlue said, the runs that I really enjoy are the ones that I tone it down and do 9:30 splits. At that pace I can run forever (or 5.3 miles right now) and when I stop I feel absolutely refreshed. It's my speed days that I dread.

  16. #46
    Liberal Feminazi Pheidippides's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    14,762

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie Jones View Post
    I've experienced this in the past as well. I've tried to starting running several times and I always push it too hard. I've suffered stress factures, shin splints, incredible soreness, etc. This time I consciously held back. Sometimes I finished a 2 mile run and felt like I could do more but I stopped myself. So far so good on being injury free but I'm only 3.5 months into running.

    And as OhioBlue said, the runs that I really enjoy are the ones that I tone it down and do 9:30 splits. At that pace I can run forever (or 5.3 miles right now) and when I stop I feel absolutely refreshed. It's my speed days that I dread.
    I enjoy the long grinding runs but my favorite are the absolute balls-to-the-wall speedy ones. Last night I was running a shorter distance and I was cruising along fairly well, and then the last mile I dropped it into my 5k race gear. It helped that I blew the doors off of a fellow runner too.

    On a side note, I also love running in the cold in my black cold weather turtleneck/tights/gloves during the Xmas season. I feel invisible (my kids call it my "ninja" costume) but I get to see all the neighborhood decorations and lights in their full glory up close.
    Awesomeness now has a name. Let me introduce myself.

  17. #47
    Board Bookworm happyone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    North Davis County
    Posts
    4,548

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nikuman View Post
    ...On a side note, I also love running in the cold in my black cold weather turtleneck/tights/gloves during the Xmas season. I feel invisible (my kids call it my "ninja" costume) but I get to see all the neighborhood decorations and lights in their full glory up close.
    I enjoy going out at night during this time of the year, if it is not too cold, this time of the year and seeing the lights also. It is definately a different feeling

    I may be small, but I'm slow.

    A veteran - whether active duty, retired, or national guard or reserve is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to, "The United States of America ", for an amount of "up to and including my life - it's an honor."

  18. #48

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by happyone View Post
    I enjoy going out at night during this time of the year, if it is not too cold, this time of the year and seeing the lights also. It is definately a different feeling
    Add me to the list that has strangely enough enjoyed the cold weather, though for me it's early in the morning not at night. And assuming I get to run again before Christmas is over, I look forward to touring the neighborhood lights.

  19. #49
    One man.....one pie Moliere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    The Republic of Tejas
    Posts
    20,885

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nikuman View Post
    I enjoy the long grinding runs but my favorite are the absolute balls-to-the-wall speedy ones. Last night I was running a shorter distance and I was cruising along fairly well, and then the last mile I dropped it into my 5k race gear. It helped that I blew the doors off of a fellow runner too.

    On a side note, I also love running in the cold in my black cold weather turtleneck/tights/gloves during the Xmas season. I feel invisible (my kids call it my "ninja" costume) but I get to see all the neighborhood decorations and lights in their full glory up close.
    I ran last night. It was 38 degrees when I started. I also like running in the cold. I currently wear one of these, which has been awesome to run in.

    http://www.shopnewbalance.com/detail.asp?style=MRJ0301

    It even has this sleeve extension thing that acts as gloves and a snot rag.

  20. #50
    Huge Member BigPiney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    5,476

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OhioBlue View Post
    Add me to the list that has strangely enough enjoyed the cold weather, though for me it's early in the morning not at night. And assuming I get to run again before Christmas is over, I look forward to touring the neighborhood lights.
    Not me, I am warm weather runner. Though, I might be able to get myself out this saturday for a very difficult trail 10 k. http://sagetosummit.com/pdf/TungstenPeak10K.pdf

    I did run this past weekend for the first time in a long time. It hurt.

  21. #51
    Senior Member Eddie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Davis County
    Posts
    6,158

    Default

    Sounds like I should just "trust" as Higdon says.

    A neighbor told me his plan for his next marathon is to not take a watch, not track time at all, and just run as fast or slow as feels good. Sounded interesting to me.

    And really - that is kind of my plan for the long runs. I'll keep track of how fast I'm running, and just go nice and easy - not even necessarily looking for consistency. Just get in the miles/distance.

    I certainly understand injuries. I pulled a calf muscle before my last marathon and only got in about 15 miles total in the 8-9 weeks leading up to the race. About three weeks ago I pulled something in my foot playing basketball and just started running again this week. I feel like I'm starting over and will just go 3 miles a day, 4 days a week - slowly building another mile or two each week through December and January.

    I like running in the morning when it is cold and dark. Rarely is there another soul out there to see - just peace and solitude. It's been fairly cold - 20-30's most days. But with a hat and gloves it warms up fast. Breathing in the cold air is awesome. Love it.

  22. #52
    One man.....one pie Moliere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    The Republic of Tejas
    Posts
    20,885

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ERCougar View Post
    Also...
    Why is it that we runners only get a stinkin thread while the cyclists get their own forum? I demand equality!
    The Bike Shop is a forum for cyclists? I always assumed it was the LGBT forum of the board so I never went there.

  23. #53
    Senior Member Eddie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Davis County
    Posts
    6,158

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nikuman View Post
    I'm officially going to jump on the barefoot wagon after this next marathon. My wife is getting me a pair of VFF Bikilas for Xmas. I've been going more midfoot with my striking lately and I am hopeful this will make my form even better. Obviously I am going to take things slow (a mile at most the first time out) but I will return and report.
    I'd love to hear how this goes. I'm interested, but skeptical. Particularly if most of your running is on hard surfaces - streets, sidewalks, etc.

    I'm thinking of picking up some minimal running flats and working them into my shorter runs for kicks - and can see myself getting into some VFF at some point if I keep hearing good things about them.

  24. #54

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie View Post
    I certainly understand injuries. I pulled a calf muscle before my last marathon and only got in about 15 miles total in the 8-9 weeks leading up to the race. About three weeks ago I pulled something in my foot playing basketball and just started running again this week. I feel like I'm starting over and will just go 3 miles a day, 4 days a week - slowly building another mile or two each week through December and January.

    I like running in the morning when it is cold and dark. Rarely is there another soul out there to see - just peace and solitude. It's been fairly cold - 20-30's most days. But with a hat and gloves it warms up fast. Breathing in the cold air is awesome. Love it.
    Amen on the breathing cold air, solitude, etc.

    unrelated, I have some running gloves from Target of all places, C9 by Champion, half-fingered with a wind-blocking mitten that I can pull off once I start warming up. Might be one of my favorite pieces of 'gear' and less than $15. Cool cold-weather gear makes running in the cold even more fun.

    On the injury thing, wow it sounds like you've been through your fair share. As a relative newcomer I just need someone to reassure me that I won't lose everything by taking a few weeks off. I have this fear that I won't even be able to run fast again for another 6 months after starting up again. It sounds like, given your experiences, you might be that person that can reassure me. Mostly kidding of course, but it does help to hear that you were able to run a marathon after so long with few miles.

  25. #55
    Liberal Feminazi Pheidippides's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    14,762

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie View Post
    I'd love to hear how this goes. I'm interested, but skeptical. Particularly if most of your running is on hard surfaces - streets, sidewalks, etc.

    I'm thinking of picking up some minimal running flats and working them into my shorter runs for kicks - and can see myself getting into some VFF at some point if I keep hearing good things about them.
    I was skeptical too, and I still am. But I grew up running barefoot across fields and dirt so it's not a foreign idea to me. And I've lately been changing my form from heel striking to midfoot/forefoot striking. This is the next step. I don't think I will run exclusively in VFF at all, but I would like to reinforce my new form and eventually switch to racing flats for most distances and races.
    Awesomeness now has a name. Let me introduce myself.

  26. #56
    Senior Member Eddie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Davis County
    Posts
    6,158

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OhioBlue View Post
    Amen on the breathing cold air, solitude, etc.

    unrelated, I have some running gloves from Target of all places, C9 by Champion, half-fingered with a wind-blocking mitten that I can pull off once I start warming up. Might be one of my favorite pieces of 'gear' and less than $15. Cool cold-weather gear makes running in the cold even more fun.

    On the injury thing, wow it sounds like you've been through your fair share. As a relative newcomer I just need someone to reassure me that I won't lose everything by taking a few weeks off. I have this fear that I won't even be able to run fast again for another 6 months after starting up again. It sounds like, given your experiences, you might be that person that can reassure me. Mostly kidding of course, but it does help to hear that you were able to run a marathon after so long with few miles.
    Sitting out with an injury sucks. I think most people have experienced them, to varying degrees - and everyone heals at different rates.

    For me - I pulled a calf muscle on my 15 mile run 8 weeks from the marathon. I rested for 3-4 days and it felt good - so I went out and didn't even finish 3 miles before it was back. I took a week off. It felt good. I went out and again - around 3 miles. I took two weeks off. I went out and ran. I made three miles and it was back again. Another 2 weeks off. Again feeling good. Again - 3 miles. Two more weeks. Three days before the race I went out and did two miles. Felt good. Did an easy one mile 2 days before the race. Again felt good. Figured I had already paid - worst that could happen is I would be catching a ride to the finish line.

    I actually felt really good the first half of the race - and finished 13.1 in about 1:45. Felt great, not tired or pressing yet, and excited about potentially finishing under 4 hrs.

    Hit a HUGE wall around mile 17. Half walked and half ran miles 21-23 and walked most of 24-26.

    I was impressed that I felt so good for the first half knowing I hadn't run longer than 3 miles in two months.

    Injuries suck - but I think you don't lose as much conditioning as you might think. I mean - I think you lose speed, but I don't think you lose all of the endurance. You'll be able to run, you'll just have to ease into it before going too fast.

  27. #57
    One man.....one pie Moliere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    The Republic of Tejas
    Posts
    20,885

    Default

    I kicked butt last night. I did a hard run and wanted to see how fast I could do a 5-k. I was hoping to beat MJs time of 26:08. I ended up at 25:20. Here are the splits:

    Mile 1- 7:47
    Mile 2- 8:40
    Mile 3- 7:59
    5K- 25:20

    I still struggle with tempo. I went out fast than I wanted and then slowed down too much. The last mile was exactly what I wanted. My problem (at least I think) is that I don't know my tempo until I finish a mile and my program tells me my splits through my earphones. Hopefully soon I'll get to a point that I can tell my tempo better just by how hard I'm pushing.
    "Discipleship is not a spectator sport. We cannot expect to experience the blessing of faith by standing inactive on the sidelines any more than we can experience the benefits of health by sitting on a sofa watching sporting events on television and giving advice to the athletes. And yet for some, “spectator discipleship” is a preferred if not primary way of worshipping." -Pres. Uchtdorf

  28. #58

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie Jones View Post
    I kicked butt last night. I did a hard run and wanted to see how fast I could do a 5-k. I was hoping to beat MJs time of 26:08. I ended up at 25:20. Here are the splits:

    Mile 1- 7:47
    Mile 2- 8:40
    Mile 3- 7:59
    5K- 25:20

    I still struggle with tempo. I went out fast than I wanted and then slowed down too much. The last mile was exactly what I wanted. My problem (at least I think) is that I don't know my tempo until I finish a mile and my program tells me my splits through my earphones. Hopefully soon I'll get to a point that I can tell my tempo better just by how hard I'm pushing.

    Nice!

  29. #59
    Board Bookworm happyone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    North Davis County
    Posts
    4,548

    Default

    I saw Santa out jogging at lunch today. The reindeer must be complaining


    Really some guy in a Santa coat and cap was out on the HAFB perimeter road at lunch

    I may be small, but I'm slow.

    A veteran - whether active duty, retired, or national guard or reserve is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to, "The United States of America ", for an amount of "up to and including my life - it's an honor."

  30. #60
    Liberal Feminazi Pheidippides's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    14,762

    Default

    Hey, you Utah runners, I need some help. I have to squeeze in a 20 miler while I'm there and need some help figuring out a route. I'm okay going one way and taking a bus back or having my wife pick me up. I will be staying within a mile of the Cabelas in Lehi.
    Awesomeness now has a name. Let me introduce myself.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •