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Thread: The TSA (Post your bad Experience by the Washington Post)

  1. #1
    Senior Member dabrockster's Avatar
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    Default The TSA (Post your bad Experience by the Washington Post)

    I have read some of these stories. WOW. There are some bad experiences people have had.. I am glad I don't travel much..

    Link if you are interested in reading about peoples complaints with TSA and their Patdowns...

    Link:
    http://views.washingtonpost.com/post...?hpid=talkbox1

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    Liberal Feminazi Pheidippides's Avatar
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    Don't have one. I travel a fair bit - not as much as some, but plenty - and I've never had an issue. I've been selected for special screening a couple of time and no big deal.

    I don't mind the full body scanners either. If some dude gets his jollies looking at my digitized dingaling, not my problem.
    Awesomeness now has a name. Let me introduce myself.

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    I travel a lot. Never had a bad experience. Know what you are doing, be prepared, and you walk through in a breeze. It's easy.

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    It is NOT a monkey! creekster's Avatar
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    I travel a fair amount and have been selected a couple of times and have never had a bad expereince or problem.
    PLesa excuse the tpyos.

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    Where's Wallace? Surfah's Avatar
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    Same. I have never had issues with TSA. I seem to get pulled out quite a bit for "random" checks too. I blame it on my last name. But it's always been quite painless.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Surfah View Post
    Same. I have never had issues with TSA. I seem to get pulled out quite a bit for "random" checks too. I blame it on my last name. But it's always been quite painless.
    I have been pulled aside many times. Never have I been through a screen where a thorough patdown (the probe the testicle kind) has taken place.. Of course, I don't fly much anymore and the last flight I took was in July.

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    Liberal Feminazi Pheidippides's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coach McGuirk View Post
    I travel a lot. Never had a bad experience. Know what you are doing, be prepared, and you walk through in a breeze. It's easy.
    Bingo. I'm sure there are isolated incidents, but my experience is that the people who have crappy experiences are the ones who are unprepared and then are belligerent and rude about it.
    Awesomeness now has a name. Let me introduce myself.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nikuman View Post
    If some dude gets his jollies looking at my digitized dingaling, not my problem.

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    One man.....one pie Moliere's Avatar
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    I used to travel quite a bit (at least once a month but oftentimes more) and I've never, ever been pulled out for further investigation. I've always gone through the metal detector and gone on with my travels.

    I did travel a couple times with a friend from Pakistan. He was pulled out of line every single time (at least 4 times that I remember). It sucked b/c I always had to wait for TSA to do their thing, but really it was just a minor inconvenience.

    I did once have a really good experience. I had just moved to Texas and had to travel to Wisconsin for work. I only had my temporary TX drivers license for ID and had no other identification available to me at the time. I flew through the airport in TX just fine but on the return trip the Milwaukee airport wouldn't accept my temp ID. I protested and said it was the only ID I had. The ID lady talked to her supervisor and they decided to let me through without a pat down or any further investigation.

  10. #10
    Resident Science Cop woot's Avatar
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    When did the new guidelines start? I haven't flown in the states since June, and didn't have to deal with any of the new stuff.

    I'm pretty shocked that the Republicans aren't making more of a stink about this stuff. Is this sort of privacy invasion and loss of civil rights justifiable for the slight possibility that it's making somebody a little safer?

    I remember hearing a comedian quip after the stupid response to the shoe bomber that he fears what our government will do if somebody makes an underwear bomb. I guess he was right to fear.

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    aka Benito Hazard thesaint258's Avatar
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    I have been pulled aside for special screening a few times, but not after the new regs started. Before it involved a general pat down (not touching any special areas) and TSA opening my carry on luggage. Now, however, the choice is between a virtual strip search or a sexual assault (I think I got that from a quote by someone at the ACLU). That choice seems ridiculous to me. All of a sudden I'm subject to the same searches a criminal is just because I bought a plane ticket?
    Not that, sickos.

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    My brother, the airline pilot, said some of his coworkers (some pilots and cabin stewards in particular) demand the pat-down.

    Then they grind and moan during the 'enhanced search', to embarrass the hell out of the TSA agent. (The more flaming the cabin steward, the more effective the embarrassment?)

    One of these days they will do that to the wrong guy and get shot.

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    TSA (presumably) stole my Glock 19. I declared it, stowed it, then TSA put a big freaking sticker on my bag to indicate to all interested parties that the unlocked bag contained a pistol. Sure enough, I show up in Montana, excited to pop some caps in a state with some sensible gun laws, and the pistol is no place to be found. Thank goodness the gun was declared, because Delta ended up paying for it (though I never replaced it).

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    The Christmas after 9/11 we were chosen for a full luggage search in the Columbus airport. The TSA agent meticulously went through every piece of clothing we had packed and unceremoniously repacking it on our behalf (IIRC, we weren't allowed to touch it after his inspection). As it were, my wife's sister had gone through the temple during the visit so we were all lugging along our temple gear. He was waving around the clothing and commenting on it's peculiarity. It got really awkward when he was looking at garments, asking if this was really our underwear. I kind of lost my temper (it was 5:30 in the morning) and almost got kicked off the flight. It was a pretty humiliating experience. I hate the TSA.

  15. #15
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    I pretty much try to avoid flying as much as possible anymore mainly because of the hassle and harassment of TSA. The TSA (and entire department of homeland security for that matter) is worthless, IMHO. If the pilots of the jets involved with the 9/11 had sidearms I believe it would have never happened (handguns in nearly every scenario I can think of beats box cutters). Airlines should be in charge of their own security. I suspect if this were the case then the insurance companies that insure airlines would do more than just put up a "security theater" to try to make people feel better about flying. Considering how much we have spent on catching relatively a few people I think TSA actually stands for Taxes Spent Absurdly.

    TSA: Taxes Spent Absurdly

    By BECKY AKERS

    The Transportation Security Administration bilks taxpayers and inconveniences passengers while not delivering safer air travel.


    HOW DO YOU TURN AN INDUSTRY THAT costs $700 million annually into one that eats $6 billion? Nationalize it, as Congress did airport screening after Sept. 11, 2001.

    Even before the groping of passengers and the rifling of their belongings became a federal duty, aviation security was never an honest solution to a legitimate problem. Federal and local governments long controlled most aspects of aviation safety, from municipalities that policed the airports they owned to the Federal Aviation Administration's air-traffic control system. When political protestors began hijacking planes in the 1960s, Uncle Sam elbowed his way into security, too. Airlines didn't hire experts to invent checkpoints; the Feds imposed them. Though private employees staffed the federally mandated metal detectors, the FAA dictated all procedures and policies, whether they involved wanding passengers or determining which items screeners had to confiscate from them.

    The Aviation and Transportation Security Act of 2001 brought that control of security into the open. In effect, it fired 25,000 non-unionized, private screeners and established the Transportation Security Administration. Congressional Democrats indebted to organized labor had long hoped to nationalize airport screening; Sept. 11 gave them a reason.

    Foisting the TSA on us protected politicians of both parties far more than it did passengers. "After 9/11," said the former chairman of the Homeland Security Committee, Christopher Cox (R-Calif.), "we had to show how committed we were by spending hugely greater amounts of money than ever before, as rapidly as possible."

    The TSA's nearly 50,000 screeners have delayed, frustrated and harassed passengers at airport checkpoints from Maine to Hawaii. What they haven't done after eight years and $48 billion is catch a single terrorist. So the agency justifies its existence by protecting us from each other, from little kids and expectant mothers, embarrassed vacationers and congressmen. One tourist claimed the sex toy that screeners fished from his luggage was a bomb rather than explain it in front of his family, while Democratic Representative John Lewis (D- Ga.) and the late Senator Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.) so menaced America that the TSA added their names to its No-Fly List. This lunacy ruins lives: The embarrassed tourist and other Americans without criminal records or motives have gone to jail.

    Unabashed, the TSA wastes our taxes on things like a lavish headquarters whose artwork and plants alone cost $500,000 -- to say nothing of its seven kitchens with Sub-Zero refrigerators. Indeed, "Irregularities in the Development of the Transportation Security Operations Center" merited their own 68-page report from an Inspector General.

    The TSA's response? Assistant Secretary David Stone huffed that since the attacks on Sept. 11 cost Americans over $100 billion and took thousands of lives, every dollar the agency spends "in an era of threatened terrorism" is worth it.

    Taxpayers might disagree. While some Americans fought a Global War on Terror, those at the TSA celebrated its second anniversary with a $500,000 party. The agency spent $81,000 for employee award plaques, including a "lifetime achievement" award for one worker with the two-year-old bureaucracy.

    More expensive and more infuriating are the geewhiz contraptions that don't work: Puffer machines at $160,000 a pop were supposed to detect residues of explosives by blowing air at passengers and dislodging particles for analysis. But the dirt and jet exhaust rampant in any airport soon sidelined these gizmos -- something the TSA might have considered or tested before buying 200 of them.

    The CTX machines it bought fared no better. Priced from $800,000 to $1.5 million each, they supposedly detect bombs in baggage by analyzing the contents' density. Unfortunately, they're "chemically blind," as the manufacturer of a rival technology put it: They can't differentiate peanut butter, fruitcake and other foods from explosives of similar density. So many false alarms resulted that screeners resorted to asking passengers what they had packed. Apparently, an agency that believes Listerine and Crest turn explosive at 30,000 feet also believes terrorists answer questions honestly.

    One thing our money hasn't bought is safety. The TSA's elaborate checkpoint charade tries to fool us into feeling secure. But screeners typically fail to find 60%, 75% and even 90% of the weapons undercover investigators smuggle past them.

    Those scores don't improve even if screeners cheat. When a bureaucrat at the TSA's headquarters alerted Federal Security Directors at airports about these pop quizzes, he described the investigators' appearance and divulged the locations of their simulated weapons. Screeners still frequently missed the contraband.

    Before Sept. 11, there was no TSA. Can we really credit the agency with stopping any terrorists in the past eight years?

    Whether weighed against history, common sense, or economics, the conclusion remains the same: The TSA is another terrorist victory. It's time we sent this boondoggle of a bureaucracy packing.
    "If there is one thing I am, it's always right." -Ted Nugent.
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    BYU Delenda Est Mormon Red Death's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Ted View Post
    I pretty much try to avoid flying as much as possible anymore mainly because of the hassle and harassment of TSA. The TSA (and entire department of homeland security for that matter) is worthless, IMHO. If the pilots of the jets involved with the 9/11 had sidearms I believe it would have never happened (handguns in nearly every scenario I can think of beats box cutters). Airlines should be in charge of their own security. I suspect if this were the case then the insurance companies that insure airlines would do more than just put up a "security theater" to try to make people feel better about flying. Considering how much we have spent on catching relatively a few people I think TSA actually stands for Taxes Spent Absurdly.
    Amen Brother.... The TSA like most federal programs doesnt have any common sense.
    "Be a philosopher. A man can compromise to gain a point. It has become apparent that a man can, within limits, follow his inclinations within the arms of the Church if he does so discreetly." - The Walking Drum

    "And here’s what life comes down to—not how many years you live, but how many of those years are filled with bullshit that doesn’t amount to anything to satisfy the requirements of some dickhead you’ll never get the pleasure of punching in the face." – Adam Carolla

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    Motor Boatin' SOB Devildog's Avatar
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    This guy wouldn't have even been caught if he had not bragged to another passenger (that he didn't even know) that he could get a knife in... right before he did it.

    A lot of good all those millions of dollars spent did.

    Ya think maybe a professional terrorist with a mission and a plan might be able to accomplish the same thing?

    http://www.ksl.com/index.php?nid=148&sid=13232642

    Passengers aboard an aircraft are not likely to sit in their seats and allow an aircraft highjacking anymore. Most would take the approach that it's better to go down swinging than to sit by and be taken to your end.

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    Junior Member Jeff Spicoli's Avatar
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    Default TSA

    Forget Zions Bank. I'm going to work for the TSA as a passenger screener. Hubba! Hubba!

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    Rabblerouser statman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie Jones View Post
    I did once have a really good experience. I had just moved to Texas and had to travel to Wisconsin for work. I only had my temporary TX drivers license for ID and had no other identification available to me at the time. I flew through the airport in TX just fine but on the return trip the Milwaukee airport wouldn't accept my temp ID. I protested and said it was the only ID I had. The ID lady talked to her supervisor and they decided to let me through without a pat down or any further investigation.
    I had a similar experience - having to travel with a TX concealed carry permit as my state-issued id. For some reason I had to show my DL as id somewhere, and I just put it in my pocket and not my wallet. When I got on a plane for work the next day, I was sans DL.

    The people in TX had no problem at all with letting me get on, but they chuckled that I might have problems in Chicago. As it turns out, I didn't have to use my CCL in OHare - my wife dropped my DL off at my boss's house, and he inter-officed it. We had a pouch that went from office to office, usually with FedEx at the end of the day. If there was some time-sensitive material, and there was someone flying from one office to another that day, they sometimes asked the employee to carry the pouch with them to the other office. My missing DL was deemed high enough priority that it got the pouch hand delivered by an Exec VP that afternoon. He was my boss's boss's boss. I felt kind of stupid having him deliver my DL to me - although he didn't have dinner plans that evening and invited me to Morton's for dinner - a much nicer meal than my daily expense allowance would pay for. Win-win...

    (hint - if you're traveling to Chicago's Western Suburbs, you don't have to go downtown for a great steak. There's a Morton's near the giant mall in Schaumburg...)

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    BYU Delenda Est Mormon Red Death's Avatar
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    I travel every week and my only complaint is that the new scanners take way too long. Other than that I fly through security.
    "Be a philosopher. A man can compromise to gain a point. It has become apparent that a man can, within limits, follow his inclinations within the arms of the Church if he does so discreetly." - The Walking Drum

    "And here’s what life comes down to—not how many years you live, but how many of those years are filled with bullshit that doesn’t amount to anything to satisfy the requirements of some dickhead you’ll never get the pleasure of punching in the face." – Adam Carolla

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    Senior Member Blueintheface's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Surfah View Post
    Same. I have never had issues with TSA. I seem to get pulled out quite a bit for "random" checks too. I blame it on my last name. But it's always been quite painless.
    Terry Bin Laden would be a difficult name. How do you cope?
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  22. #22

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    [YOUTUBE]XSQTz1bccL4[/YOUTUBE]
    I guess this 4 year old was pretty suspicious. Here is what the person filming it said happened.

    Lets get the facts straight first. Before the video started the boy went through a metal detector and didn't set it off but was selected for a pat down. The boy was shy so the TSA couldn't complete the full pat on the young boy. The father tried several times to just hold the boys arms out for the TSA agent but i guess it didn't end up being enough for the guy. I was about 30 ft away so i couldn't hear their conversation if there was any. The enraged father pulled his son shirt off and gave it to the TSA agent to search, thats when this video begins.

    ******* THIS VIDEO OCCURRED AT SALT LAKE CITY INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT ON NOVEMBER 19TH AT AROUND THE TIME OF 12:00 PM **********

    ***Insertion of what happened after the video (full story)****

    After I finished videotaping the incident I went through the check point myself. I collected my things and went over to talk to the father and son. Before I could get to them a man in a black suit who had been talking with the other TSA officials approached me. He asked to speak to me and I obliged, wondering what was to come. He then proceeded to interrogate me about why I was videotaping the "procedures of the TSA". I told him that I had never seen such practices before on a young child and decided to record it. The man being frustrated at this point demanded to know my plans with the video, of which I didn't respond. Repeatedly he asked me to delete the video, hoping his mere presence could intimidate me to obey, but I refused. By this point it became obvious that he felt TSA had done something wrong and that I caught it on tape. After the interview, I left for my gate. I called my brother who told me I should put the tape on YouTube because this had been a recent hot topic in the news.
    My gate was a long way off, but about 15 minutes after arriving 2 TSA agents came and sat 15 feet or so away from me. I stood up and moved so that they were in front of me and then took a picture. A 3rd and then a 4th agent came and sat down with the others. They would occasionally glance at me and talk on their walkie-talkies. I don't know why they were there or if it was a huge coincidence but they stayed for 30-45 minutes and left just before I boarded the plan. Interesting to say the least, intimidating? Maybe a little...
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    Senior Member dabrockster's Avatar
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    I tell ya.. I am flying to Orlando in January with my family. I swear, if they try and "pat down" my new born daughter in any way. I may be chatting with all of you from inside a jail from beating the shit of out the TSA agent...

    I am hoping this is not the norm and that these are extreme cases.. However, my luck for being pulled out for an additional inspection has been bad for a long time.. I am not excited about this trip to say the least...

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    So it turns out I have an abnormal groin according to the body scanners at LAX. That abnormal groin caused me to miss my flight from LAX to SLC after already traveling for well over 20 hours. It added about 4 hours to our trip becaused of the missed flight. In total it took a little over an hour to go through the screen and that was after waiting about 1 hour in line. 20 minutes waiting for my pat down and then 45 minutes when they finally got to me. I'm a big guy, but 45 minutes in a small room with two other dudes touching me seemed excessive and it was very uncomfortable.

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    Not Banned Tim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coach McGuirk View Post
    I travel a lot. Never had a bad experience. Know what you are doing, be prepared, and you walk through in a breeze. It's easy.
    Wait, you think peoples' complaints are the results of them not knowing what to do or being unprepared? Talk about missing the mark!
    Visca Catalunya Lliure

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    Quote Originally Posted by CJF View Post
    So it turns out I have an abnormal groin according to the body scanners at LAX. That abnormal groin caused me to miss my flight from LAX to SLC after already traveling for well over 20 hours. It added about 4 hours to our trip becaused of the missed flight. In total it took a little over an hour to go through the screen and that was after waiting about 1 hour in line. 20 minutes waiting for my pat down and then 45 minutes when they finally got to me. I'm a big guy, but 45 minutes in a small room with two other dudes touching me seemed excessive and it was very uncomfortable.
    Write your congressional representatives. I was so mad yesterday that I wrote one of them. Now, I'm giving an exam in back to back classes, so I' taking care of the rest of them. Jim DeMint first. Who's next. Lindsey Graham....mine won't do any good, but the heteroglossia can.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim View Post
    Wait, you think peoples' complaints are the results of them not knowing what to do or being unprepared? Talk about missing the mark!
    CONFORM, CITIZEN!
    Last edited by wuapinmon; 11-23-2010 at 05:45 AM.
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    Soul Plumber wuapinmon's Avatar
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    Dear. Hon. Sen. Graham,

    I am deeply troubled by the thinning of our 4th Amendment rights at the airport. The additional screening measures enacted recently are taking us ever closer to that turning point that is rarely recognized in the moment as catastrophic to our fundamental freedoms. However, as is often the case, hindsight provides us with a too-late vision of when the fall occurred. I don't want this to be the case in this day and age. I'm hoping for someone to have the courage and leadership to say, "We can't live in such fear that we allow safety and security to erode what makes this nation great." I hope that you'll be the one to start this clarion call for a return to constitutionality in our transportation systems.

    The video I watched yesterday of a 4 y/o boy being searched with his shirt off at the SLC airport is deeply troubling. Are we really going to screen small children in this way? The thought of anyone touching my 8, 4, or 2 y/o children like this, in public, for the world to capture on a cell phone camera makes me not want to fly anymore. I shouldn't have to subject myself to unreasonable screenings just because I want to fly. At some point we have to draw a line in the sand and say enough is enough. Well, Sen. Graham, my voice is one out of many, and you've been appointed to speak for me. Enough is enough. Please add this one voice to the many that inform your actions in Congress.

    wuap
    In case you need some inspiration.
    "Yeah, but never trust a Ph.D who has an MBA as well. The PhD symbolizes intelligence and discipline. The MBA symbolizes lust for power." -- Katy Lied

  28. #28
    𐐐𐐄𐐢𐐆𐐤𐐝 𐐓𐐅 𐐜 𐐢𐐃𐐡𐐔 Uncle Ted's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coach McGuirk View Post
    I travel a lot. Never had a bad experience. Know what you are doing, be prepared, and you walk through in a breeze. It's easy.
    I think this really depends on the airports you travel in and the shade of your skin, IMHO. Some airports are absolutely nazis when it comes to security. For example, I keep my TX Concealed Handgun License and Drivers License in the same pocket in my wallet. Therefore, I sometimes pull out my CHL for showing a government issued ID. I have never had a problem in DFW doing this. Once I did this in SJC and they nearly had a cow wouldn't accept it. I thought that was ironic given I had to submit three sets of fingerprints to get that CHL. In Texas, almost anyone, citizen or not, can get a drivers license. It only requires passing a test, paying the fee, and being photographed.
    "If there is one thing I am, it's always right." -Ted Nugent.
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    TSA agent tried to steal my buddy's cell phone this summer. We put our stuff in the little bins and sent them through the xray. The idiot in front of us was wearing some form of chain mail so that bogged down the metal detector line and our xray stuff got through and piled up prior to us getting through. When we all finally got through the metal detector and started collecting our gear, my buddy said, "My cell phone is missing." We started looking everywhere and calling the cell phone but to no avail. We looked in and around the xray machine and still couldn't find it. My buddy even looked in the trash can beneath the machine and couldn't find it. The TSA guys were starting to be real dicks so I went to the police officer who stands at a counter just behind the security line and I told him that we wanted to report a theft and that we had reason to believe a TSA guy may have been involved. The cop called the TSA supervisor, the supervisor showed up, and one of the TSA clowns "found" the phone in the trash can searched minutes before. My buddy took the time to admonish the rest of the people to watch their walets and stuff when it went through security and then we left for our flight.

  30. #30
    Soul Plumber wuapinmon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wuapinmon View Post
    Write your congressional representatives. I was so mad yesterday that I wrote one of them. Now, I'm giving an exam in back to back classes, so I' taking care of the rest of them. Jim DeMint first. Who's next. Lindsey Graham....mine won't do any good, but the heteroglossia can.
    I got this today.

    Dear Dr. Williams,

    Thank you for contacting me to share your concerns about the new TSA security screening procedures. I share your concerns and want to assure that I will continue to work to ensure that the TSA makes the privacy concerns of the traveling public a top priority when they implement new security measures.

    As you are aware, new TSA security procedures have been authorized by Administrator Pistole in response to the Christmas Day terrorist attack. These procedures use Advanced Imaging Technology (AIT) as an integral part of a layered security approach to detect and stay ahead of evolving threats.

    The use of AIT machines has presented several concerns related to passenger privacy; including the clarity of the image viewed and the invasiveness of pat-downs for some travelers. To protect passenger privacy, the TSA has applied filters to AIT machines to blur out facial and body features without sacrificing safety. To further protect passenger privacy, technicians viewing images produced from AIT machines are in a remote location so that they do not see passengers being screened. Additionally the Administrator of the TSA has committed that they will deploy software, Automated Target Recognition, that replaces the traveler's image with a stick–figure like image. Once ATR can demonstrate that it does not produce high false positives it will be implemented.

    As you may know for passengers that opt out of AIT use, the TSA uses physical pat downs as an alternative form of screening. As ATR deploys, the need for physical pat downs will subside.

    Fundamentally though, the TSA needs to incorporate Israeli practices of screening procedures and behavior analysis. The Israelis have the premiere model of air travel security while treating passengers with courtesy, respect, and professionalism. The TSA needs to incorporate the Israeli's approach which screens for the terrorist and the weapons, not just weapons.

    Thank you again for sharing your thoughts with me. Please be assured that I will continue to bring this issue up with the Administration and work to ensure that they make traveler privacy a top priority.

    Again, please feel free to contact me in the future about anything important to you or your family. It is an honor to serve you and the people of South Carolina.


    Sincerely,

    Jim DeMint
    United States Senator
    "Yeah, but never trust a Ph.D who has an MBA as well. The PhD symbolizes intelligence and discipline. The MBA symbolizes lust for power." -- Katy Lied

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