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Thread: The "last movie I saw" thread

  1. #5401

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    Darkest Hour last night. Loved it. I agree with Brian though, the subway scene was a dumb deviation.

    Oldman was amazing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LiveCoug View Post
    Darkest Hour last night. Loved it. I agree with Brian though, the subway scene was a dumb deviation.

    Oldman was amazing.
    What I gather from those who liked the movie is the acting and dram was well-done.

    What has turned me off to the movie is that it is grossly inaccurate and although it paints an interesting character, it is not the true character of Churchill. The movie apparently paints as a man of self doubt and indecision when he was anything but that. He was often arrogant and rude but not the character that Oldman portrays.
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    lollygagger hostile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Topper View Post
    What I gather from those who liked the movie is the acting and dram was well-done.

    What has turned me off to the movie is that it is grossly inaccurate and although it paints an interesting character, it is not the true character of Churchill. The movie apparently paints as a man of self doubt and indecision when he was anything but that. He was often arrogant and rude but not the character that Oldman portrays.
    I didn’t see him as having self doubt or indecision in the movie. He questioned vigorously the counters to his proposals. But he also recognized the near-futility of the task at hand as country after country continued to fall to Hitlers advance.
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    Quote Originally Posted by hostile View Post
    I didn’t see him as having self doubt or indecision in the movie. He questioned vigorously the counters to his proposals. But he also recognized the near-futility of the task at hand as country after country continued to fall to Hitlers advance.
    I have read numerous reviews on the movie, all of which have dissuaded me from wanting to see it due to its gross historical inaccuracies and mischaracterization of Churchill, despite dramatically well-done. People who don't read about Churchill will see this mischaracterization as Churchill is my fear.

    From the National Review's review:

    Now it’s Churchill’s turn to be shrunken down to a more manageable size. In Darkest Hour, which is set across May and June of 1940, the English director Joe Wright and his star Gary Oldman conspire to create a somewhat comical, quavering, and very human prime minister. In dramatic terms it’s an engaging picture, and Oldman is terrifically appealing, but if you’re looking for indecision and angst, the person of Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill is a curious place to declare you’ve found it. Darkest Hour begins with the resignation of Neville Chamberlain (Ronald Pickup) and Churchill’s accession to the premiership on May 10, 1940, building up to the concluding “We shall fight on the beaches” speech he delivered in the House of Commons on June 4, after the miraculous Dunkirk rescue. (The flight of British forces from the Continent takes place almost entirely offscreen here but has been covered in another movie this year. It also inspired a memorable interlude, captured in one of the most elaborate continuous shots ever put to film, in Wright’s own 2007 movie Atonement).

    Read more at: http://www.nationalreview.com/articl...urchill-memory
    And further:

    Such moments capture the sense of a Britain gasping for air as Hitler’s fingers tightened their grip around its neck. But then, in its last half-hour, Darkest Hour veers far off the path of truth. Screenwriter Anthony McCarten has claimed, citing Cabinet minutes, that Churchill’s intentions changed virtually from “hour to hour,” and “this is not something that’s ever been celebrated — that he had doubts, that he was uncertain.” All of this is a gross exaggeration. Churchill told his War Cabinet on May 28 “that every man of you would rise up and tear me down from my place if I were for one moment to contemplate parley or surrender. If this long island story of ours is to end at last, let it end only when each one of us lies choking in his own blood upon the ground.” I understand the needs of Method actors, but Churchill was not George McFly.

    Read more at: http://www.nationalreview.com/articl...urchill-memory
    And the re-writing of May 1940.

    Darkest Hour’s version of the story is very different. Halifax and Chamberlain are portrayed in a more sinister light, scheming to replace Churchill by putting his policy to the test of a vote of confidence. Churchill is portrayed as being at a loss about how to get control of the situation. He turns to the King, who suggests that he see what “the people” think. For the first time in his life, Churchill decides to ride the Underground. In a journey of two stops he asks a half-dozen people standing near him whether Britain should fight or negotiate. This impromptu focus group urges him to fight and never surrender. Armed with this popular “mandate,” Churchill has the courage to overrule Halifax. Churchill then meets the other members of Cabinet, who endorse his position, and he goes from there directly to the House of Commons, where he delivers his famous “we shall fight on the beaches … we shall never surrender” speech, and receives a standing ovation, including Chamberlain. At that point, Halifax admits defeat. In the final screen of the movie, we learn that Churchill sent Halifax “to Washington” several months later.

    There are several things inaccurate about this version of the story. The subterranean focus group is pure fiction. Halifax gave up his advocacy of negotiations at the War Cabinet meeting of May 28. Churchill gave his “we shall fight on the beaches” speech a week later, on June 4. Finally, Churchill did send Halifax to Washington – as Ambassador.

    Seen in this light, screenwriter Anthony McCarten was attributing Churchill’s public policy victory to his successful reading of the mood of “the people” and his oratory. The use of the subterranean focus group represents a kind of populism, a belief that “the people,” not the elites, know best. In fact, Churchill’s policy victory was the result of his ability to win over the other members of the elite in the War Cabinet, including Chamberlain, and to neutralize Halifax. McCarten neglecting to mention that Churchill sent Halifax to Washington as ambassador was because McCarten had painted Halifax as a near-traitor, so that appointing him to represent the UK in its most critical diplomatic relationship would have made no sense. Had Halifax been portrayed in a more nuanced way, the appointment would have been understandable.
    Last edited by Topper; 12-30-2017 at 01:35 PM.
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  5. #5405

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    Quote Originally Posted by Topper View Post
    Saw Three Billboards Outside of Ebbing Missouri

    An artistic "black comedy crime" movie focused upon the inability to solve a year old rape-murder of a local girl. The acting is superb, in that broken, poor white trash, are shown in their frailty but with some aspect of humanity still in tact. Frances McDormand and Woody Harrelson show unvarnished characters as part of blue collar middle America. The lack of resolution is part of its painful appeal.
    One of my favorites of the year.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katy Lied View Post
    Finally saw Wonder Woman. My only two thoughts upon leaving the theater were 1. Gal Gadot is very beautiful, 2. Do you think Pellegrino will have the hots for Diana Prince since she speaks ancient Greek?
    Quote Originally Posted by Walter Sobchak View Post
    My only thought is this: why do otherwise-respectable adults watch comic book superhero movies?
    God bless you Jodie Foster. Happy New Year.
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  7. #5407
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    Quote Originally Posted by Walter Sobchak View Post
    Asked whether she would ever consider making a film about a superhero, she said she would consider it, but only if they had “really complex psychology”.


    They are ruining Hollywood but if they finally decide to include me then that would be fine!!


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  8. #5408
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    Quote Originally Posted by Walter Sobchak View Post
    Hooray for Jodie! But why did she use that stupid fracking analogy? It doesn’t ruin the earth. Good grief.
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    Adventurer Walter Sobchak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lebowski View Post
    Hooray for Jodie! But why did she use that stupid fracking analogy? It doesn’t ruin the earth. Good grief.
    Agree.
    You're actually pretty funny when you aren't being a complete a-hole....so basically like 5% of the time. --Art Vandelay

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  10. #5410
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    If you enjoy Aaron Sorkin dialogue (West Wing, The American President, A Few Good Men, The Social Network, etc.), you’ll enjoy Molly’s Game. It’s the true story of a woman who started hosting very high-stakes poker games first in LA and then NYC. She was later prosecuted by the feds because of her alleged involvement with the Russian mafia.

    While a typical screenplay is around 100 pages in length, Sorkin’s are usually twice that long, or longer, due to heavy, rapid-fire dialogue. This one’s no different, but it held our interest throughout. I didn’t like it quite as much as his other movies (this was also Sorkin’s directorial debut), but thought it was still very good. Jessica Chastain, as always, turns in a strong performance.

    I haven’t posted in this thread for awhile, but going back a few weeks I’m still appreciating Three Billboards (some very good performances there) and Darkest Hour (hand Oldman the Oscar now and save some time).

    I also confess to seeing and enjoying Jumanji. I went in with very low expectations, but watching the stars (including The Rock, Jack Black and Kevin Hart) channeling teenagers with personas very different from their own was good for a lot of laughs. We usually attend movies during weeknights when the crowds are small or nonexistent, but we saw this one in a full theater and everyone busting up throughout the movie enhanced the experience.

  11. #5411
    Major disappointment The_Tick's Avatar
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    The Greatest Showman.

    Absolutely loved it. I was in tears. So so good.

  12. #5412
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Tick View Post
    The Greatest Showman.

    Absolutely loved it. I was in tears. So so good.
    Would someone who really disliked Chicago and Moulin Rouge enjoy it?
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Tick View Post
    The Greatest Showman.

    Absolutely loved it. I was in tears. So so good.
    My wife just saw it with two of our kids, and reported back that she enjoyed it. Her movie critiques are not on par with Siskel and Ebert or even PAC or Steel Blue.

    "Did you enjoy the movie? Do you have a review?"

    "Loved it." Nothing more.
    "Guitar groups are on their way out, Mr Epstein."

    Upon rejecting the Beatles, Dick Rowe told Brian Epstein of the January 1, 1962 audition for Decca, which signed Brian Poole and the Tremeloes instead.

  14. #5414
    Major disappointment The_Tick's Avatar
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    Possibly.

    Did you enjoy Les Mis?

    I enjoyed it immensely.

  15. #5415

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    My wife has now seen the greatest showman 3 times.

    I still have zero desire to see a singing movie.

  16. #5416
    Bald not naked Pelado's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LiveCoug View Post
    My wife has now seen the greatest showman 3 times.

    I still have zero desire to see a singing movie.
    A movie that sings? That's incredible!
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  17. #5417
    My Mic Sounds Nice falafel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Tick View Post
    Possibly.

    Did you enjoy Les Mis?

    I enjoyed it immensely.
    Haven't see Les Mis in any singing format. There was a non-singing format a while back. I saw that one.
    Ain't it like most people, I'm no different. We love to talk on things we don't know about.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LiveCoug View Post
    My wife has now seen the greatest showman 3 times.

    I still have zero desire to see a singing movie.
    Is it a musical? A PT Barnum musical, a la Oklahoma?
    "Guitar groups are on their way out, Mr Epstein."

    Upon rejecting the Beatles, Dick Rowe told Brian Epstein of the January 1, 1962 audition for Decca, which signed Brian Poole and the Tremeloes instead.

  19. #5419

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    Quote Originally Posted by Topper View Post
    Is it a musical? A PT Barnum musical, a la Oklahoma?
    Yeah, it's a musical. I would say its heritage is singin' in the rain (no, it's not as good). It's telling a period story but for the most part doesn't try to worry about historical accuracy or the historical point of view. The characters reflect 21st century sensibilities (for the most part) in the same way the characters of singin in the rain reflect the sensibilities of the 1950s rather than the 20s.

    What I liked.

    Lack of ironic detachment. It's a post modern form in many ways but avoids the ironic detachment of most post modernism (I think Hamilton also does this). I think the movie is better for it. It allows the movie to be quite sentimental. I think for the most part the sentimentalism works pretty well.

    What I didn't?

    It's quite didactic (actually it's probably better to say moralistic). Which I didn't mind but the the didactic points are pretty cliched and in so many 21st century movies.

    It gets caught between the two periods in ways that bothered me. Some/Much of the dramatic tension revolves around period attitudes but almost all of the the main characters are clearly reflecting 21st century attitudes. It was too much dissonance for me.

    What's in between?

    The lyrics/score. I don't think it rises to the level of a really good broadway score/lyrics, but it's okay/enjoyable. I thought the high school musical boy's vocal performances were surprisingly good. I actually liked them.
    Last edited by pelagius; 01-05-2018 at 09:45 PM.

  20. #5420
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    Quote Originally Posted by pelagius View Post
    Yeah, it's a musical. I would say it's heritage is singin' in the rain (no, it's not as good). It's telling a period story but for the most part doesn't try to worry about historical accuracy or the historical point of view. The characters reflect 21st century sensibilities (for the most part) in the same way the characters of singin in the rain reflect the sensibilities of the 1950s rather than the 20s.

    What I liked.

    Lack of ironic detachment. It's a post modern form in many ways but avoids the ironic detachment of most post modernism (I think Hamilton also does this). I think the movie is better for it. It allows the movie to be quite sentimental. I think for the most part the sentimentalism works pretty well.

    What I didn't?

    It's quite didactic. Which I didn't mind but the the didactic points are pretty cliched and in so many 21st century movies.

    It gets caught between the two periods in ways that bothered me. Some/Much of the dramatic tension revolves around period attitudes but almost of the the main characters are clearly reflecting 21st century attitudes. It was too much dissonance for me.

    What's in between?

    The lyrics/score. I don't think it rises to the level of a really good broadway score/lyrics, but it's okay. I thought the high school's musical boy's vocal performance were surprisingly good. I actually liked them.
    Excellent review. It looks like a Netflix film for me, unless you give a two thumbs up, but your review makes it sound "meh".
    "Guitar groups are on their way out, Mr Epstein."

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  21. #5421

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    Quote Originally Posted by Topper View Post
    Excellent review. It looks like a Netflix film for me, unless you give a two thumbs up, but your review makes it sound "meh".
    Yeah, pretty mixed view. Overall, I enjoyed it. Go if your wife likes musicals.

  22. #5422

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donuthole View Post
    I saw The Shape of Water yesterday. I like it, but I'm not sure I love it. It's a period piece and an obvious homage to monster-horror films from generations ago. It's visually stunning, just as you would expect from Guillermo Del Toro, and the sets are fantastically detailed and colored. It's a fun story with likeable characters, but for me the story arc just fell a little flat. For one, it's a little too black and white about who is good and who is bad--perhaps that part of the homage to films of old. But more nuance with the characters, or perhaps some back story about why the foil was so unreasonable, might have made for a more interesting climax. The show was plenty long, but the relationship between the protagonist and her lover felt rushed and superficial. The antagonist, Michael Shannon, is great, but it feels like he plays the exact same character in everything; he essentially reprised his exact character from Boardwalk Empire for this role. Richard Jenkins is also great, and I wouldn't be surprised to see a best supporting actor nominee for him. In fact, this thing is going to get tons of Oscar buzz, and will likely be nominated in all of the major categories. It's definitely worth seeing, but I don't think it's nearly as profound as it wants to be.
    I had the exact same feeling. I wanted to like it more than I did. I appreciated that each main character was either lonely or
    marginalized by society. And some of the scenes were visually stunning. But a little too heavy-handed for me to consider it profound.

    Mrs. NWC and my son lol’d all the way home from the theater. They couldn’t get enough of calling it a dumb fishman movie.

  23. #5423
    Board Bookworm happyone's Avatar
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    Mrs Happy and I went to the local discount theater (Kaysville) this past weekend and saw two period pieces

    The Man Who Invented Christmas - about Charles Dickens and the writing of "A Christmas Carol" Christopher Plummer plays the character Scrooge as Dickens is writing the novel. I thought it was an interest look at the process of writing a novel

    Goodbye Christopher Robin - the story of A.A. Milne and the writing of the Winnie-the-Pooh stories. Milnes PTSD is really played up. He was in the Battle of the Somme. Hiis son's resentment as he grew older is also a major plot point towards the end of the movie.

    I enjoyed both of them. They are both a little slow moving, Goodbye.. more than A Man... and like the Churchill movie I think you have to take the history with a couple of handfuls of salt

    If Victoria and Abdul is still there this next weekend, Mrs Happy has expressed a desire to see it.
    Last edited by happyone; 01-17-2018 at 10:32 PM.

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    I expect the Best Picture Oscar nominations to be announced Tuesday will be better, top to bottom, than those of last year. Within the past week I've seen two that should be on the list and I enjoyed them both very much.

    The Post is very good, with strong performances from Meryl Streep, Tom Hanks and a good supporting cast (although I like Jason Robards as Ben Bradlee in All The President's Men better). The 45-year-old story is very timely in view of current events and it was interesting for me to contrast my feelings back then (Daniel Ellsberg was a traitor!) with the sympathy I feel now for those willing to risk a career to help expose government wrongdoing (not that all of them are without fault...). I didn't care much for the misplaced conclusion (the totally unrelated Watergate break-in), but still, a strong movie.

    I liked I, Tonya even more, perhaps much more. So many great performances, esp. Allison Janney as Tonya Harding's mother (truly awesome), and the guy playing Shawn Eckhardt was hilarious. Margot Robbie was very convincing, on and off the ice, and deserves a lot of credit for bringing the story to the screen. If you haven't thought much about Tonya in the aftermath of 1994, I promise you'll feel very differently about her when you see the movie. Tonya was a very flawed person, but it's easy to see why when you see what various sources confirm as being true about her upbringing. Lots of profanity, but it's essential to the story, and what an amazing story it is. There are loads of laughs, but also some very poignant and disturbing moments throughout the film which is based on interviews with all of the major characters. Because of the sometimes conflicting versions of what happened, the characters occasionally talk straight to the audience and you get lines like "This is bullshit! This never happened." And yet despite the conflicts, you come away with a very clear sense of who these people are, and a greater sympathy for the lousy hand life dealt to Tonya.

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    Phantom Thread! It’s amazing! Go see it!


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    Jumanji-- Wasn't really my idea to go and I can't say I've even seen the Robin Williams one from the 90's, but it was pretty entertaining. I like about every movie with Jack Black, I like most movies with the Rock, and I like some movies with Kevin Hart, (and that tall girl from Scotland is super hot ) so it was a pretty good time.
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  27. #5427

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    Quote Originally Posted by Commando View Post
    Jumanji-- Wasn't really my idea to go and I can't say I've even seen the Robin Williams one from the 90's, but it was pretty entertaining. I like about every movie with Jack Black, I like most movies with the Rock, and I like some movies with Kevin Hart, (and that tall girl from Scotland is super hot ) so it was a pretty good time.
    Have you seen The Polka King with Jack Black on Netflix? I liked it.
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  28. #5428
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    Quote Originally Posted by Commando View Post
    Jumanji-- Wasn't really my idea to go and I can't say I've even seen the Robin Williams one from the 90's, but it was pretty entertaining. I like about every movie with Jack Black, I like most movies with the Rock, and I like some movies with Kevin Hart, (and that tall girl from Scotland is super hot ) so it was a pretty good time.
    Quote Originally Posted by frank ryan View Post
    Have you seen The Polka King with Jack Black on Netflix? I liked it.
    I enjoyed both those movies. Polka King kind of reminded me of Bernie - Jack Black playing a sympathetic lead in a biographical crime story.

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    It is NOT a monkey! creekster's Avatar
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    Juilliardk

    N I ibuprofen
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    It is NOT a monkey! creekster's Avatar
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    I





    U unhurt u
    PLesa excuse the tpyos.

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